Faculty News – December 2013

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He talked to MarketWatch about a pending H-P shareholder lawsuit and to KGO about a possible IPO of AMC Theaters.

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in Forbes about privacy issues with electronic data in cars.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was quoted in an extensive story in Bloomberg BNA about a privacy-legislation hearing held at SCU quoted about problems posed by state regulations affecting the Internet. KGO Radio also carried a story about the event. He was also quoted by SF Weekly about school Internet “snooping,” and by Bloomberg BusinessWeek about an online-review lawsuit, among other tech-law media mentions.
  • He was quoted in the Washington Post about protecting anonymous Internet content, among numerous other tech-law stories. His Technology and Marketing Law Blog was named one of the top 100 “Blawgs” by ABA Journal.


Deep Gulasekaram, Associate Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in a widely reprinted USA Today story about Sergio Gomez, an undocumented immigrant who is poised to be permitted to practice law in California. He also spoke to KTVU about the issue.
  • He co-wrote an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times about the limitations of the President’s powers to halt deportations. The piece also ran in several other sites or papers.

Al Hammond, Professor of Law

  • spoke to NPR’s Marketplace about efforts by tech giants like Google to own their own data-transmission cables so they don’t have to rely on telecom companies.

Paige Kaneb, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law, Northern California Innocence Project

  • She was quoted in a story in the Sacramento Bee about a couple accused of killing their adopted child despite what NCIP believes is a lack of evidence.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in several stories from the Mercury News, the Washington Post, SF Weekly, and others, about the next steps in the high-profile Apple Samsung case. The stories ran in hundreds of papers or sites.

Sandee Magliozzi, Associate Clinical Professor of Law and Director, Professional Development and Externships

  • She presented a paper with co-author Terri Mottershead at the University of St. Thomas Law Journal Fall Symposium “What Legal Employers and Clients Want—The Competency-Model Approach to Legal Success.” The topic was “Can Competencies Drive Change in the Legal Profession?”. The article will be published in the Journal’s upcoming symposium volume. Magliozzi also was a panelist in December at the 2013 Professional Development Institute in Washington DC on “How Legal Educators Are Shaping the Future of the Profession: Challenges, Triumphs, and Reflections from Around the World.”

Tyler Ochoa, Professor of Law


Cookie Ridolfi, Professor of Law


Margaret Russell, Professor of Law


Tseming Yang, Professor of Law

  •  He wrote an op-ed about the tactic of “sue and settle” in environmental regulation, which ran in 89 different papers nationwide including the United Emirates’s The Gulf TodayDenver PostOrange County Register and the Kansas City Star.

Faculty News – November 2013

David Ball, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted by the San Francisco Daily Journal on  immigration policy impacts on Muslims.

Patricia Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in widely republished Bloomberg story about the coming tax headaches for same-sex married couples.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in U.S. News & World Report on the question of whether law school ought to be a two-year program, and in MarketWatch about Apple’s management.

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • Her comments to the Mercury News about NSA privacy issues appeared in nearly 20 additional stories.
  • She spoke to Associated Press about nondisclosure agreements linked to the mysterious barges being built by Google, for a story that appeared in more than 350 locations including the (Toronto) Globe and Mail, New York Post, the Republic, and the Weather Channel.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was a guest on NYC’s public radio station, discussing California’s “eraser button” law requiring online companies to remove records at the request of minors, a topic he also discussed in a widely cited Forbes op-ed. He discussed “revenge porn” laws in a widely republished New York Times story, in a Forbes op-ed, and in ABA Journal.  He wrote an article about anti-spam lawsuits for CircleID, was quoted in GigaOM about Facebook privacy settlements, and in MarketWatch about Yelp.
  • He discussed Yelp review issues with the Orange County Register and Search Engine Watch. He also talked about revenge porn with ABA Journal and Slate.com, among other tech news.

Deep Gulasekaram, Associate Professor of Law

  • He appeared on NBC Bay Area to discuss Sunnyvale’s anti-gun law, which is being fought by the NRA..

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in Law360 about patent infringement lawsuits.

Bob Peterson, Professor of Law

  • He was part of two panel discussions in Minneapolis in front of the Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) in Minneapolis on insurance issues relating to self-driving cars.
  • At the behest of the Griffith Foundation, on November 21 he gave the lunch-time address in Nashville to the National Conference of Insurance Legislators (NCOIL) on Subrogation. This group of state legislators meets to consider model laws and position papers relating to current insurance issues of trans-state or national importance.

Stephen Smith, Associate Clinical Professor of Law

  • He authored an article, “Defendant Silence and Rhetorical Stasis,” 46 Conn. L. Rev. 19 (Nov. 2013).

Tseming Yang, Professor of Law

  • He was appointed to the board of Earthjustice, one of the largest public interest environmental law firms in the world. Read more…

Clinic and Center News – November 2013

  • The influence and success of Santa Clara Law’s High Tech Law Institute was the subject of a lengthy feature story in the legal publication The Recorder, and quoted or mentioned Eric Goldman, Colleen Chien, Laura Lee Norris, Brian Love and Fabio Marino, as well as several influential alumni.
  • Freed NCIP client George Souliotes was the subject of a front-page story in the LA Times and another client, Maurice Caldwell, was the subject of  a story in SF Weekly. The latter story quoted or mentioned Linda Starr, Cookie Ridolfi, and Paige Kaneb (NCIP).

Faculty News – October 2013

Evangeline Abriel , Director, Legal Analysis, Research and Writing Program and Clinical Professor of Law


Patricia Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was the keynote speaker at a National Conference in DC of the Tax Section of the American Institute of CPAs. About 600 to 700 CPAs participated in this event.
  • She was quoted in a Washington Post story about new tax issues facing married same-sex couples.
  • She was quoted on the tax issues following the Windsor case in a number of news publications, including the New York Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, and Tax Notes. She participated in a number of Continuing Legal Education programs to discuss the tax consequences of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) decision on couples in same-sex marriages. She has done telephonic webinars for the National Academy of Continuing Legal Education, the Tax Section of the ABA, Pincus Professional Education (California), and the ABA Real Property, Trust and Estate Law Section. She spoke on a plenary session about this issue at the National Conference sponsored by the National LGBT Association (an ABA affiliate) and also presented on three additional breakout panels at that conference. She participated in a panel discussion about the Windsor case and the recently issued Revenue Ruling at a Santa Clara Bar Association educational event. She also participated in a symposium at Elon Law School (in North Carolina) that focused on the Windsor case.


Colleen Chien, Associate Professor of Law

  • She is serving in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) as senior advisor for intellectual property and innovation to Todd Park, the U.S. chief technology officer. She will take a leave of absence from her teaching duties for at least a year to fulfill her new appointment, which began Sept. 16. In this role, she will advise Park on issues related to intellectual property and innovation, as well as privacy, open government, and civil liberties. Her work on patent trolls has sparked a national conversation, including a White House proposal for reform that repeatedly cited her research.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He spoke to Marketwatch about Twitter’s IPO. He also had a book published, Rights and Revolution: The Rise and Fall of Nicaragua’s Sandinista Revolution (Vandeplas Publishing).

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in an AP article about the Google barge in San Francisco Bay. Read the article…

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News and on ABC7 about Facebook’s changing decision on violent content on its site. More than a dozen other publications or sites used the story. His views on “revenge porn” Google’s ad policies and a hacker’s prison sentence for altering posts also continued to be in the news, appearing in about five dozen stories including a widely reprinted USA Today story.
  • He was named to ABA Journal’s list of top law blogs (Blawgs), he was named by Habeas as one of the top 5 lawyers to follow on Twitter, and he was listed on Excite.com list of Top 20 Law Blogs.
  • He was quoted in a wide array of tech stories, including a New York Times story that ran in over 50 outlets about a lawsuit alleging Google “wiretapping,” and a Washington Post story that appeared in about 100 outlets worldwide, about Google adding user reviews in their ads. He spoke to the Cincinnati Enquirer about a hacker being sentenced to six months in jail for changing users’ comments and to the International Business Times and WNYC, which aired on several other public radio stations, about laws against “revenge porn.”

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • His paper on the role of the federal executive on in spurring state immigration law was synopsized in ImmigrationProf Blog.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He published several articles, including “Expanding Patent Law’s Customer Suit Exception,” co-written with Jim Yoon and published in the Boston University Law Review; “Make the Patent ‘Polluters’ Pay: Using Pigovian Fees to Curb Patent Abuse,” co-written with Jim Bessen and published in the California Law Review; and “An Empirical Study of Patent Litigation Timing: Could a Patent Term Reduction Decimate Trolls Without Harming Innovators?,” published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review. He also coauthored an article, “Best Mode Trade Secrets” in the Yale Journal of Law and Technology. He recently published two op-eds: “Tax the Patent Trolls,” co-written with Jim Bessen and published in USA Today; and “No: Software Patents Don’t Spur Innovation, but Impede It,” published in the Wall Street Journal.

Jean Love, Professor of Law

  • She recently published a law review article, “Teaching Preliminary Injunctions After Winter,” in the St. Louis University Law Journal. She is a member of the SALT LGBT Committee, and in that capacity she assisted Professor Suzanne Goldberg in 2012–13 by editing Professor Goldberg’s amicus brief in the Perrycase (the Prop. 8 case)—an amicus brief that SALT later signed.

Kenneth Manaster, Professor of Law


Margaret Russell, Professor of Law

  • She is the recipient of a Fulbright fellowship by the Council for the International Exchange of Scholars. She will spend six months in Tanzania in 2014, researching human rights jurisprudence and documenting the work of the Tanzania Women Judges Association’s “Jurisprudence on the Ground” project.
  • She appeared on KQED’s Forum, to discuss the SCOTUS affirmative action case. Listen to the show here.

David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law & Policy

  • He wrote an article, “Kiobel and Extraterritoriality: A Rule Without a Rationale,” which appeared in the Maryland Journal of International Law. He also co-authored an essay with Vivian Curran, “Reviving Human Rights Litigation After Kiobel,” which was published in the American Journal of International Law.

Gary Spitko, Professor of Law

  • He delivered a lecture in May, “The Enforceability of Arbitration Agreements After AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion,” at the 2013 California Appellate Judicial Attorneys Institute.

Stephanie Wildman , Professor of Law

  • She published a new casebook and teacher’s manual, Social Justice: Professionals, Communities, and Law 2d (2013) (with Martha Mahoney and John Calmore). She cowrote a chapter, “A Colorblindness Is the New Racism: Raising Awareness about Privilege Using Color Insight” (with Armstrong), in Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning As Allies in the Classroom (Kim A. Case ed., 2013). She also published several articles including “Revisiting Privilege Revealed and Reflecting on Teaching and Learning Together,” which appeared in the Washington University Journal of Law & Policy.

Tseming Yang, Professor of Law

  • He was appointed to an American Bar Association task force on sustainable development. He also co-authored with Xuehua Zhang an article, “Public Participation in Environmental Enforcement … with Chinese Characteristics?: A Comparative Assessment of China’s Environmental Complaint Mechanism,” which appeared in the Georgetown International Environmental Law Review.

Faculty News – September 2013

Evangeline Abriel , Director, Legal Analysis, Research and Writing Program and Clinical Professor of Law

  • She presented oral arguments before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on September 11, 2013, in the case of Gonzalez-Salazar v. Holder.

Patricia Cain, Professor of Law

  • She spoke on three panels at the ABA Tax Section’s Joint Meeting in San Francisco (with Real Property, Trust and Estate Law) .
  • She was quoted in Bloomberg BusinessweekThe Advocate, and a widely reprinted New York Times story about state and federal  tax implications for gay married couples.
  • She was quoted in the New York Times, as well as Buzzfeed.com, about a landmark IRS ruling about gay married couples filing jointly.  Her appearance at a National LGBT Bar Association event was covered by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education.
  • She participated in a special program sponsored by the ABA Section on Real Property, Trust and Estate Law called “Professor’s Corner.” She was on the line for an hour with a Harvard Law School Professor who runs their Estate Planning Clinic discussing the effect of the Windsor opinion on Estate Planning and answering live questions from practitioners around the country. There were over 200 lawyers participating in the call.

Colleen Chien, Associate Professor of Law

  • Her move to the White House made news in Politico, IPWatchdog.com, RoadRunner,  Law360, and Giga Om. Her research on patent “trolls” was also analyzed in a widely reprinted Wired.com story and she wrote an op-ed for TechCrunch — which also ran in other blogs — about what to do if your business is hit by a patent troll demand.
  • Her research on the impact of patent assertion entities was cited by an op-ed that ran in the LA Times and several other outlets, as well as by The American, Mobile Tech TodayCRMDaily, and other outlets.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law


Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • Her comments to the Mercury News about NSA privacy issues appeared in nearly 20 additional stories.
  • She was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News regarding the ongoing controversy over NSA surveillance.
  • She appeared on Nightly Business Report on CNBC about Twitter’s use in trading and stock markets. He also was quoted in Corporate Counsel about a controversial new service for “certifying” law schools.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was a guest on NYC’s public radio station, discussing California’s “eraser button” law requiring online companies to remove records at the request of minors, a topic he also discussed in a widely cited Forbes op-ed. He discussed “revenge porn” laws in a widely republished New York Times story, in a Forbes op-ed, and in ABA Journal.  He wrote an article about anti-spam lawsuits for CircleID, was quoted in GigaOM about Facebook privacy settlements, and in MarketWatch about Yelp.
  • He was quoted in a widely aired NPR news program about fingerprinting technologies, and in MediaPost about Yelp litigation over faked positive reviews. He also talked to KGO radio about tech lobbying.
  • He was quoted in the New York Times,  RedOrbit and the Atlantic Wire about Twitter’s general counsel stepping down. JD Supra quoted his comments to MediaPost about a case holding a website operator liable for defamation for a user’s comments.  He was quoted on the issue of “revenge porn” and other topics in the New York TimesSan Francisco ChronicleBusinessWeekHouston Chronicle, Seattle Post-IntelligencerTechWeb, and Search Engine Watch.   More than a dozen publications or outlets carried a story quoting him about a YouTube lawsuit.

Kyle Graham, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News article about the Rim Fire in Yosemite, and possible criminal charges, jail time and restitution for the hunter who started it. Professor Graham is a former fire fighter nd deputy district attorney in Mono County, which abuts Yosemite. The story was carried by more than a dozen additional publications.

Anna Han, Associate Professor of Law

  • She spoke to KCBS radio on several occasions, about the International Trade Commission ruling in the Apple Samsung dispute.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in several stories, running in more than five dozen outlets including Financial Review, Wall Street Journal, and numerous papers affiliated with the San Jose Mercury News, about Apple and Samsung’s next legal battle.  He was quoted in The Recorder about a GAO report on patent litigation.

Northern California Innocence Project’s work on prosecutorial misconduct was cited in a ProPublica story about a Texas prosecutor charged with depriving a wrongfully imprisoned man of a fair trial.


Michelle Oberman, Professor of Law

  • She published several articles, including “Cristina’s World: Lessons from El Salvador’s Ban on Abortion,” in Stanford Review of Law & Social Policy; “Two Truths and a Lie: In re John Z. Stories at the Juncture of Teen Sex and the Law,” in the Journal of Law & Social Inquiry; and “Getting Past Legal Analysis … or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Teaching Rape,” in the Creighton Law Review. She also delivered several conference speeches, including “Neonaticide and Access to Abortion: Why the Law Doesn’t Matter,” at Addressing Filicide: Inaugural International Conference for Cross National Dialogue (Prato, Italy, June, 2013); “Enlisting Doctors in the Post-Roe Abortion Wars: Informed Consent, Conscience Clauses & the Demise of Fiduciary Duty,” at the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, University of California at San Francisco Medical School (May, 2013); and “Informed Consent, Conscience Clauses, and the Newest Generation of Abortion Laws,” at the Stanford Law and Policy Review, Roe v. Wade at 40 Symposium (February, 2013).

Bob Peterson, Professor of Law

  • He was part of a panel discussion in Las Vegas in front of the State Insurance Trade Association (SITA) regarding insurance issues relating to self-driving cars.

David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law & Policy

  • He spoke to NBC Bay Area News about the role of international law in Syria’s use of chemical weapons.

Gerald Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to KCBS radio about sentencing guidelines.
  • He was quoted in the Sacramento Bee regarding Goodwin Liu, the latest appointment to the California Supreme Court.

Santa Clara Law Events in the News


Full-Time Faculty News – August 2013

Margalynne Armstrong, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News discussing the reality of racial profiling and assumptions that disadvantage young black men.

George Alexander, Dean Emeritus


Patricia Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was included in one of the three plenary sessions at the annual LGBT Law Conference known as Lavender Law and sponsored by the National LGBT Law Association, an ABA affiliate. At this event, she also participated on four different panels, one dealing with income tax planning, one dealing with advanced estate planning issues, one on employee benefits, and one on creating change through administrative action.
  • She was quoted in the SF Chronicle and Bloomberg BusinessWeek about complicated questions arising from the repeal of DOMA. She also was quoted in widely reprinted stories in the  Anniston Star and its editorial pages, and in USA Today.
  • She gave two presentations to Santa Clara University audiences: one was to the LGBT faculty and staff group and the other was to the LGBT student group at the law school.

Colleen Chien, Associate Professor of Law

  • She was named one of the 50 most influential people shaping intellectual property toda by Managing Intellectual Property, , which cited Chien’s work on patent assertion entities, including the fact that she coined that term.. She also was quoted in Atlanta Journal-Constitution about patent trolls.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He spoke to MarketWatch about Dell’s shareholder issues.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He has given numerous talks and workshops, including a talk, “IP in the Online World—Social Media, Domain Names, Copyright and TM issues,” at the 4th Global Forum on Intellectual Property 2013, in Singapore, in August.
  • He was quoted by Bloomberg regarding a petition by state attorney generals to modify the Communications Decency Act.
  • He was named to ABA Journal’s top 100 law blogs, called Blawgs. He was also quoted in stories in MediaPostN.J. Star-LedgerCincinnati Enquirer; Inc. magazine online, as well as  a widely reprinted New York Times story, discussing Twitter’s response to demands for user information in a case in France, and a Mercury News story, which ran in dozens of additional outlets, about Apple’s e-book ruling.

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He contributes blog posts on immigration court decisions to the website of the national American Constitution Society for Law & Policy, most recently in August, in an entry titled “Immigration Federalism Post-Arizona.”
  • His op-ed, “Same-sex marriage decisions come with costs,” in USA Today, addressed some less appreciated features of the Supreme Court’s Defense of Marriage Act and Prop 8 decisions.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law


Margaret Russell, Professor of Law

  • She spoke to Real Clear Politics blog about whether the Supreme Court is acting like a lawmaking body. She also co-wrote an op-ed that ran in the San Francisco Chronicle comparing the Prop. 8 Supreme Court ruling and other “landmark” equality cases.

Gerald Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to Catholic News Service about marijuana laws, and to the LA Times about the slim chance for success by gay-marriage foes trying to halt wedding licenses.

Clinical Faculty News – August 2013


Full-Time Faculty News – July 2013

Pat Cain, Professor of Law

  • She discussed financial complexities to be resolved after the Supreme Court’s DOMA decision with the New York Times, a story that was picked up by several additional publications or sites. She also discussed similar subjects with Bloomberg and Forbes.
  • She participated in online webinar sponsored by the ABA Tax Section that included Shannon Minter, National Center for Lesbian Rights, and private attorneys from New York and DC and Florida who are experts on these issues.
  • She participated in a two hour CLE panel for the Santa Clara Bar Association.

Colleen Chien, Associate Professor of Law

  • She testified on Capitol Hill, her second appearance before Congress in the past year. She discussed abusive patent litigation in her appearance before the Intellectual Property and Internet Subcommittee of the House Judiciary Committee.

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He spoke to CBS5 about erosions to the Voting Rights Act, and  was also a featured guest on multiple time slots on ABC7  and KTVU (Fox), helping analyze the DOMA and Prop. 8 decisions.

Bob Peterson, Professor of Law

  • He was part of a panel discussion in Las Vegas to the Association of California Insurance Companies (ACIC) on Uninsured/Underinsured motorist coverage.

Full-Time Faculty News – June 2013

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law


Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He presented “Branding and Trademark Challenges and Opportunities” at the Tenth Annual Stanford E-Commerce Best Practices Conference, Stanford Law School in June.
  • He was quoted in Time magazine about Obama’s plans for patent reform and in the Newark  Star Ledger about FTC’s actions against Wyndham Worldwide for allowing cyber theft.

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He spoke to KPIX news and ABC 7 news on the Supreme Court Voting Rights Decision
  • He spoke to Bay City News about the upcoming Prop. 8 Supreme Court decision, for a story picked up by about a half dozen outlets.

Anna Han, Associate Professor of Law

  • She spoke to KCBS Radio from China, about the Apple e-Book trial alleging Apple conspired with the nation’s largest publishing houses, and she spoke to Voice of Russia radio about the visit of China’s president Xi Jinping to the U.S.

David Hasen, Associate Professor of Law

  • He spoke to spoke to KGO and KLIV radio, as well as KPIX news, about the tax implications and other effects of the Supreme Court ruling on DOMA and Proposition 8, which legalized same-sex marriages.

Brad Joondeph, Professor of Law

  • He discussed the same-sex cases as they were pending with the Mercury News and discussed the impact of the DOMA decision with the National Catholic Reporter.
  • He was quoted in a story on CBS5 about the Supreme Court’s ruling that DNA can be collected from arrested citizens.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law


Michelle Oberman, Professor of Law

  • She spoke on “Neonaticide and Access to Abortion: Why the Law Doesn’t Matter,” at Addressing Filicide: Inaugural International Conference for Cross National Dialogue in Prato, Italy.

Margaret Russell, Professor of Law


Ed Steinman, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to CBS5 about the controversial secret government collection of phone and Internet data of U.S. citizens.

Gerald Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • spoke to the Ventura County Star about the future of gay-marriage litigation, and discussed legal strategies in the Prop. 8 case with the LA Times; his comments to the Timeswere cited in the Christian Science Monitor and cited or picked up by 33 other papers or sites.

Clinical Faculty News – June 2013

Angelo Ancheta, Executive Director, Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center

  • comments about the pending immigration bill for a Mercury Newsstory were carried on more than two dozen affiliated sites or papers.
  • He spoke to Latino USA, which aired on numerous NPR stations nationwide, about challenges to race-based admissions policies as a significant Supreme Court decision on the issue is pending.

Linda Starr, Legal Director, Northern California Innocence Project

  • She and NCIP were featured on KTVU (Fox) show Bay Area People, along with exoneree Maurice Caldwell.

Full-Time Faculty News – May 2013

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law


Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He discussed “Recent Developments with Section 230” at the 2013 World Technology Law Conference & Annual Meeting in Scottsdale, in May.
  • His comments to USA Today about the new Internet tax bill appeared in nearly four dozen publications. He also was quoted on tech-law issues in Social Times,iHealthBeat, and ReadWrite.

David Hasen, Associate Professor of Law

  • He wrote an editorial for MarketWatch on a bill that the Senate is considering to make sure taxes on internet sales are paid.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • His research suggesting a new way of handling patent-infringement claims against customers, was carried by Forbes.
  • He was part of a debate on the Wall Street Journal’s online Technology Report, on the question “Should Patents Be Awarded to Software?”. Professor Love argues that no, software patents don’t spur innovation, but impede it.

Michelle Oberman, Professor of Law

  • She spoke on“Enlisting Doctors in the Post-Roe Abortion Wars: Informed Consent, Conscience Clauses & the Demise of Fiduciary Duty,” at the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, University of California at San Francisco Medical School.

Clinical Faculty News – May 2013


Full-Time Faculty News – April 2013

David Ball, Assistant Professor of Law


Pat Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was featured on several dozen public radio stations across the country after she did an interview for Morning Edition about the Supreme Court’s hearing on DOMA. She also spoke to NBC Bay Area about the topic.

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law

  • On April 17, 2013, she testified before the House Judiciary Committee’s Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet Subcommittee hearing on “Abusive Patent Litigation: The Issues Impacting American Competitiveness and Job Creation at the International Trade Commission and Beyond”. Here is a link to the hearing. Here is a link to Professor Chien’s written testimony. Professor Chien’s testimony was reported by Reuters, Computerworld, PCWorld and others.
  • She was named a “Woman of Influence” by the Silicon Valley Business Journal. From the intro sentence: “Chien is a global influence in the intellectual property community.”

Steve Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He spoke to MarketWatch for a widely republished story about Dell’s buyout efforts, and to Bloomberg Businessweek about the SEC allowing corporate disclosures via social media.

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in a widely reprinted USA Today story about privacy issues surrounding smart cars.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was quoted by Time Magazine regarding the YouTube copyright case.
  • He spoke to the Wall Street Journal about ADA issues online; to the Mercury News about the SEC allowing corporate disclosures via social media; and toMediaPost about AP’s win against a clipping service and a New York court upholding the “Amazon tax.” Advertising Age also interviewed him for a story on the value of data.
  • He was quoted in Hispanic Business regarding the decision Netflix received from the SEC about announcing corporate milestones, and other information, via social media technologies.

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He wrote an op-ed on guns and immigration as barometers of who gets to be an American, for USA Today. It ran in more than a dozen other outlets as well.
  • He spoke with various media, including ABC 7, NBC Bay Area and the Bay City News,  about the Supreme Court’s hearing on California’s gay-marriage ban, Prop. 8.

Anna Han, Associate Professor of Law

  • She spoke to the press to help analyze Apple’s historic move to apologize to Chinese consumers for their warranty program. The following media carried her comments, with the resulting coverage appearing in 140 outlets:      San Jose Mercury News, New York Times China Daily, KCBS Radio, and KGO radio.

Ellen Kreitzberg, Professor of Law

  • She discussed California’s death penalty with KPCC.

Margaret Russell, Professor of Law

  • She spoke with various media, including NBC Bay Area, San Francisco Chronicle, Bloomberg Law‘s radio podcast, and the Bay City News,  about the Supreme Court’s hearing on California’s gay-marriage ban, Prop. 8.

David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law & Policy

  • He spoke to Bloomberg Law‘s radio podcast about the controversy over the U.S. drone program.

Clinical Faculty News – April 2013

Caroline Chen, Director, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic and Assistant Clinical Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in a Mercury News story which featured Santa Clara Law’s Low Income Taxpayer Clinic and appeared in about two dozen papers or sites, including the Los Angeles Times and the Arizona Daily Star.

Northern California Innocence Project

  • An Oakland Tribune columnist did an in-depth story, which ran in numerous affiliated papers and sites, about the exoneration by NCIP of Ronald Ross.

Full-Time Faculty News – March 2013

Pat Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was on NPR Morning Edition as part of a panel discussing tax implications for the Supreme Court’s decision on the Defense of Marriage Act
  • An AP story in which she talked about possible income tax regulation changes for gay couples was carried in about 450 publications or sites including the Sacramento Bee, Boston Globe, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, USA Today and the Houston Chronicle.

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law


Steve Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News regarding the ouster of board members at Hewlett-Packard by major investors, just two years after a major boardroom shake-up.
  • was quoted in the Wall Street Journal regarding the “dueling CEOs” in Dell’s bid to become private.
  • spoke to MarketWatch about H-P’s battle with its institutional investors.

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in the Washington Post and USA Today about the legal issues with cars being linked to wireless networks. More than 60 percent of vehicles worldwide will be connected directly to the Internet by 2017, up from 11 percent last year, predicts ABI Research.There are few legal standards for what information a vehicle can collect, how it can be used and by whom. Each manufacturer produces its own onboard Internet systems, each with specific rules that few consumers review and even fewer understand, said privacy experts. “People are being duped into giving away a whole lot of information that maybe somebody ought to ask us about first,” said Dorothy J. Glancy, a Santa Clara University law professor who studies privacy and transportation. “It seems to me you ought to get a choice.”

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was named one of “The 50 Most Influential Law Professors Alive Today” by MJE.com.
  • was quoted in the Wall Street Journal regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act and online shopping websites.
  • was quoted by KQED about Reddit’s changes in its user agreement to avoid liability under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.
  • spoke to Reuters and Mashable about new FTC guidelines about advertising on social media. About 60 other publications or sites carried the story.

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was interviewed by KLIV radio about the voting rights act case and by KGO radio about a state senate bill threatening to remove tax-exempt status for entities that discriminate against gay people.

Brad Joondeph, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to the San Jose Mercury News about the Obama administration acting against California’s Prop. 8.

Bob Peterson, Professor of Law

  • He gave a two day seminar in Sonoma to the CA State Assembly Insurance Law Committee on Insurance 101.

David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law & Policy


Jerry Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in the LA Times regarding a trial of ex-city council members in the city of Bell who were charged with corruption.
  • spoke to Reuters for a widely reprinted story about the similarities between the swing vote justices on California’s high court and the Supreme Court.

Clinical Faculty News – March 2013

Northern California Innocence Project


John Schunk, Associate Clinical Professor

  • He published an article, “Indirectly Assessing Writing and Analysis Skills in a First-tYear Legal Writing Course,” 40 So. Univ. L. Rev. 47-118 (Fall 2012).

Staff News – March

Deborah Moss-West, Assistant Director, Center for Social Justice and Public Service


Full-Time Faculty News – February 2013

Pat Cain, Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in CNNMoney about quirks in the adoption tax credit for same-sex couples. About 33 sites picked up the story.
  • was quoted in a New York Times article about the tax ramifications for same-sex married couples because, while some states recognize their marriages the federal government does not. Several other papers ran the story.

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law

  • She presented a new paper at the Patent and Trademark Office’s roundtable on software patents at Stanford University.
  • has received a $35,000 research grant from the New America Foundation to expand her work relating to “Start-ups and Trolls”. This grant will fund an expanded survey to determine the impacts of Patent Assertion Entities (PAEs) on the operations, growth, and innovation of startups. This version of the survey will also explore trends in patent purchasing, strategies for responding, and the market for “troll solution” providers.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law


Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He was a guest on an ABC Nightline segment about “revenge porn,” or people posting risqué photos of exes online. He was also quoted about other tech-law cases by the Wall Street Journal, KQED radio, ReadWrite, and InformationWeek.
  • For the second year in a row, Professor Goldman has been named North American IP Thought Leader by Managing Intellectual Property. Read more…

Anna Han, Associate Professor of Law

  • She spoke to the San Jose Mercury News about Google leader Eric Schmidt’s criticisms of China in a new book. About two dozen other sites or papers carried the story.

Brad Joondeph, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to KCBS and the San Jose Mercury News about the Obama administration’s efforts to strike down Prop. 8. About a dozen other papers carried the story as well.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He spoke with the Chicago Tribune about the rejection by an appeals court of  Apple’s request to fast-track its bid for a sales ban on several Samsung phones.

Michelle Oberman, Professor of Law

  • She spoke on “Informed Consent, Conscience Clauses, and the Newest Generation of Abortion Laws,” at the Stanford Law and Policy Review, Roe v. Wade at 40 Symposium.

Catherine Sandoval, Associate Professor of Law

  • She was floated as one of the “names under discussion” to be the next FCC chairman, by Time Magazine.

Tseming Yang, Professor of Law

  • He wrote an op-ed urging a balanced approach to energy investment, which appeared in more than 40 papers across the country, including the Kansas City Star, Anchorage Daily News, and the Orange County Register.

Clinical Faculty News – February 2013

Caroline Chen, Director, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic and Assistant Clinical Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News story that also ran in 17 other publications, about the high incidence of tax-related identity theft in the Bay Area.

Northern California Innocence Project

  • Helped free its 13th wrongly imprisoned person—Ronald Ross of Oakland—and was included in  news and editorial pages with stories from Associated Press, KPIX – TV, KGO-TV, ABC7, the Oakland Tribune, San Jose Mercury News, San Francisco Chronicle, KLIV radio and others. Several dozen other papers or sites carried the various stories as well.

Full-Time Faculty News – January 2013

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law

  • Her study in patent “trolls” and their inordinate pursuit of small startups continued to make news, including in TechCrunch and Newsfactor.
  • Commentary from her ran in about 80 publications after she discussed the important patent implications from the Google FTC settlement with Reuters and others, among other patent issues.
  • was quoted in a story in Wired about oddball tech moments of 2012.
  • spoke with the New York Times about the Federal Trade Commission’s settlement with Google in regards to patents covering communications and data transmission technologies for smartphones and tablets.
  • was selected to receive the 2013 Professor Eric R. Yamamoto Emerging Scholar Award by the Conference of Asian Pacific American Law Faculty (CAPALF). Professor Yamamoto is an internationally renowned authority on issues of redress and reconciliation and he has written and spoken extensively about how healing the wounds of past injustice by “doing justice” now can reach deeply into a nation’s social fabric. The award will be presented on Friday, February 1, 2013 at the Conference of Asian Pacific American Law Faculty at UC Hastings School of Law.
  • paper on the rise of “trolls” as plaintiffs in patent lawsuits was covered by nearly 90 papers or sites, including Dow Jones’ All Things D, and a Reuters story that was carried in more than two dozen other sites or papers.

Steve Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in a Businessweek article, redistributed in about 10 other outlets, about the Securities and Exchange Commission being urged to reevaluate its disclosure policies.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • He wrote a blog for Forbes about lawsuits over “revenge porn,” or people posting risque content to get back at an ex-lover. He spoke to Courthouse News Service ABC7, Media Post, Information Week, Ars Technica, Reuters and others about that and other high-tech legal issues.
  • His commentary appeared in several dozen news sites after he discussed Google’s settlement; the implications of tech activist Aaron Swartz’s suicide, and a lawsuit over online consumer reviews with Reuters and other news outlets.
  • appeared in about five dozen stories, after he spoke to numerous outlets including the Mercury News, San Francisco Chronicle, the Wall Street Journal, Reuters, the New York Times, Boston Globe and others about the FTC’s settlement with Google over search practices. He also talked to the (Wilkes-Barre, Pa.) Times Leader about attorneys using Facebook for photographic evidence to make their cases, and to the Associated Press and MediaPost about a suit over Instagram’s Terms of Service.
  • was quoted in an article on CNN.com about how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) doesn’t specifically mention websites and, therefore is being interpreted as not applying to them.
  • wrote an article for Forbes magazine about the FTC’s investigation into Google’s search practices. Professor Goldman states, “Ending the investigation into Google’s search behavior is a smart decision by the FTC, but the FTC’s initial decision to investigate Google’s search practices was terrible.  We’ve known since the beginning that regulating search results makes no sense.” Read more…
  • talked to NPR’s Weekend Edition, in a story aired widely nationally, about lawsuits against those who write negative Yelp reviews. He also wrote a multi-part series on “How to Fix Software Patents” based on the recent conference held at SCU, for Forbes.com.

Pratheepan Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was quoted in the Los Angeles Daily Journal about the bipartisan Senate proposal for immigration reform.
  • is mentioned in the student newspaper at UC Riverside for his recent article on immigration reform. His article “…provides a systematic, empirical investigation of the genesis of state and local immigration regulations, discrediting the popular notion that they are caused by uneven demographic pressures across the  country.”

David Hasen, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He was interviewed by CNBC.com on the payroll tax holiday expiration. He also was interviewed by KCBS radio and by KLIV radio about the fiscal cliff tax implications.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • He spoke to Associated Press and Korea Times about a request to lower the damages award in the Apple-Samsung case. Several dozen papers and sites picked up the story.
  • appeared in about six dozen stories after speaking to Reuters, Ars Technica, Daily Journal, Bloomberg, mLex and the Pittsburgh Tribune about a $1.2 billion patent judgment against Marvell Semiconductor.
  • was quoted in dozens of outlets about the latest phase of the Apple Samsung patent lawsuit, after talking to the LA Times ;and the Korea Times, among others. He also wrote an op-ed for TechCrunch about what should happen in the injunction phase of that case.

Margaret Russell, Professor of Law

  • She spoke to KLIV and KGO radio about the Supreme Court accepting two key gay-rights cases, DOMA and Prop. 8.

David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law & Policy

  • He commented to the Mercury News about legal charges and possible extradition of John McAfee. Twenty other outlets carried the story.

Ed Steinman, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to the San Jose Mercury News for a widely republished story about a vigilante charged with murder.

Gerald Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • He spoke to the Los Angeles Times for a widely reprinted story about a “bizarre” case in which a rape conviction was voided over questions about whom the alleged rapist was impersonating when he committed the act.

Tseming Yang, Professor of Law

  • He wrote an op-ed piece on the climate change negotiations in Doha, Qatar which was published by CNN.com

Clinical Faculty News – January 2013

Angelo Ancheta, Executive Director, Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center and Associate Clinical Professor of Law

  • He received a cy pres award for $62,557.86 in the wage & hour case of Garcia v. Oracle. This latest award bring the Alexander Center’s cy pres award total for the year to nearly $105,000.00.

Maitreya Badami, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law, Northern California Innocence Project

  • She was mentioned in a story about best practices in eyewitness identification in the Orange County Register.

Francisco J. Rivera Juaristi, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law and Director, International Human Rights Clinic

  • An “Alumni Profile” about him was published by American University in their Human Rights Brief publication. Read more…

Linda Starr, Legal Director, Northern California Innocence Project and Associate Clinical Professor of Law

  • She was quoted in a story in California Lawyer, about the process of restitution for the wrongfully convicted.

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Full-Time Faculty News July – December 2012

Pat Cain, Professor of Law

  • was quoted in a recent San Francisco Chronicle article about financial ramifications for same-sex couples if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns the federal Defense of Marriage Act. Read more…
  • was quoted in a recent Forbes article about the upcoming gay marriage cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. Read more..
  • was quoted in a New York Times blog about same-sex couples filing protective refund claims amid uncertainty over marriage equality. TaxProf Blog ran the story. She also talked to Tax Analyst about a circuit court ruling finding the federal Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional.
  • The 2012 Supplement to her casebook, Sexuality Law, 2nd Edition, Carolina Academic Press (co-authored with Arthur S. Leonard) was published in August.
  • was the Norman A. Sugarman Tax-Scholar-in-Residence at Case Western Reserve School of Law where she delivered a lecture, “Taxing Families: The Troubling Disconnect Between State and Federal Law” (available here ). In June she delivered a paper on the same topic at the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Honolulu. Later in June she was the principal speaker at a special session of judges and family law attorneys at the annual meeting of the Iowa State Bar. The session was sponsored by the Williams Institute (U.C.L.A. School of Law) as part of its judicial education program. Her topic was “Same-Sex Marriage in Iowa: Legal Issues on the Horizon.”
  • published two articles, “The New York Marriage Equality Act and the Income Tax,” 5 Albany Government Law Review 634 (2012) and “A Section Memoir,” 80 UMKC Law Review 727 (2012), which was part of a collection of reflections from four decades of Chairs of the Section on Women in Legal Education, AALS.
  • spoke at the Knowledge Congress’ webcast entitled: “Legal Series: Employment Law Same Sex Marriages Legal Issues in 2012.” More info…

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law

  • An article about her study of “patent trolls” was published by Reuters on December 10, 2012. Patent trolls are individuals and companies that do not themselves make anything, but are, for the first time, bringing the majority of U.S. patent lawsuits. Read the article…
  • spoke at a workshop held by the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission on the impact of patent assertion entity (PAE) activities on innovation and competition and the implications for antitrust enforcement and policy. The workshop took place on December 10, 2012 in Washington D.C.
  • spoke to Wired magazine about the complexities of today’s patent-approval process. She also talked to the Wall Street Journal about Cisco’s experience with patent “trolls”.
  • was quoted in the New York Times about a twist in the Apple-Samsung patent case. The International Herald Tribune and Economic Times were among the outlets that picked up the story.
  • spoke with the International Herald Tribune about the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s decision that one of the smartphone patents at the center of the legal dispute between Apple and Samsung Electronics – which resulted in a jury award to Apple of $1.05 billion – should never have been granted. The article was also printed in the New York Times.
  • co-wrote an op-ed for TechCrunch on 10 things that small companies can do when confronted by a lawsuit brought by a “patent troll” alleging patent violations. Her study and Congressional testimony on the topic were noted in the Financial Times as well as the blog The Rackspace Blog and Newsroom.
  • was quoted in the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal about Oracle suing to defend its customers from patent suits, and in a Q&A about what to do about patent “trolls.”  Her paper on the topic was also covered by Law360.
  • her new study that found small companies bear the worst brunt of patent litigation was featured in a Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal story. The North Korea Times, Albuquerque Express, Argentina Star, and others picked up the story. Chien also was quoted by Bloomberg BusinessWeek about fallout from the Apple-Samsung trial.
  • Published her article on the ITC’s remedies, with Mark Lemley, entitled Patent Holdup, the ITC, and Public Interest with the Cornell Law Review. Article available here…
  • Prepared her article, Reforming Patents, for publication with the Houston Law Review. Article available here…
  • was quoted in a New York Times article about the Apple-Samsung verdict. “This ruling sends a message to all the handset makers that you have to make truly differentiated products that look different,” said Colleen V. Chien, an assistant professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law. “And that’s the message Apple wanted to send with its litigation.”
  • testified before the House Committee on the Judiciary regarding the ITC and patent disputes. Read her prepared testimony at this link.
  • submitted a public comment (joined by 18 other academic and industry leaders) on the ITC investigation pertaining to Motorola and Apple. Read more…
  • was quoted in an article published by the Telegraph (UK) about the patent dispute between Samsung and Apple. Read the article…

Steve Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • spoke to MarketWatch about the multiple woes of  H-P.
  • was quoted in a Reuters story that ran in at least a half-dozen sites, about retirement fund issues at GM and Ford. He also talked to Marketwatch about Apple without Steve Jobs.
  • was quoted in a Chicago Tribune article about the sell-off of Facebook stock. “The weakness in the stock price creates a huge human resources problem for the company because stock options are a major part of compensation,” University of Santa Clara law professor Stephen Diamond said. “The company may be tempted to re-price the options or be forced to increase cash compensation or else risk losing key employees. That puts pressure on profit margins and further pressures the stock.”

David Friedman, Professor of Law

  • appeared in a ReasonTV video discussing “How to Privatize Everything.”

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • Prof. Glancy was appointed to the National Academies National Research Council’s Transportation Research Board Committee on Long-Term Stewardship of Safety Data from the Second Strategic Highway Research Program.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • was quoted in The New York Times about Facebook’s announcement that users’ photos uploaded to Instagram (which Facebook purchased) would be subject to being used used as advertisements. (Professor Goldman) said the latest skirmish between Facebook and its users was part of the sometimes uncomfortable dynamic between companies offering free online services and their eventual need to turn a profit from them. “The interest of the site is never 100 percent aligned with the users, and the divergence inevitably leads to friction,” Mr. Goldman said. “It’s unavoidable.”
  • was quoted in Social Times about the legal complexities of the shutdown of  Megaupload; in CNET and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal about new patent office director Michelle Lee; and the San Antonio Express-News about a proposed bill to protect employee Internet privacy.
  • For the fourth year in a row, Professor Goldman’s Technology & Marketing Law Blog was named to the ABA Journal‘s Blawg 100, their annual list of the best in blogs about lawyers and the law.
  • spoke with the San Antonio Express-News about a Texas state bill that would protect employees using the internet. Professor Goldman said that California’s version of the law, which extends to “prohibit schools from requesting students’ credentials to online accounts, has its own problems. “Something about the breadth of the law and the restrictions on employers doing things that might be very organic and normal leads to potential collusion,” Goldman said. Goldman said the California version of the law does not define “social media” specifically enough, resulting in the law applying to almost all digital content including information saved on servers and external hard drives. A larger problem for the California version, Goldman said, is determining if the social media account belongs to the employer or the employee. He pointed to several court cases around the country that are in the process of determining who legally owns the accounts.
  • spoke to Bloomberg news about online techniques that led searchers for one presidential candidate to be led to information about another, known as “brand hijacking”.
  • was quoted in an AP story about the legal risks of critical online patient reviews of doctors, a story that was picked up by 210 publications or sites. He also talked to Business Insider about the surprising significance of a case lost by Zappos and to Media Post about Village Voice suing Yelp, among other tech-law stories.
  • spoke to American Public Media’s Marketplace about the difficulty of policing paid recommendations on social media sites. He also was quoted by the Calgary Herald about a lawsuit alleging Gmail’s ad targeting is illegal. TechCrunch, CIO Finance, Times Colonist, the blog All Spammed Up and numerous other Canadian papers picked up the story. He also wrote a blog entry for CircleID about flaws in the proposed Cloud Computing Act of 2012, and talked to TechCrunch about sex trafficking on backpage.com.
  • was quoted in a widely re-printed FoxNews article about a case involving online doctor reviews.
  • spoke to MediaPost about a lawsuit brought by the actress in the amateur video that sparked extreme violence in Libya and the Mideast.
  • was promoted to full professor in Fall 2012
  • since May 1, 2012 has given several talks: he spoke at the California State Bar Symposium “IP and the Law” at the Los Angeles Marriott on September 14th; Fifth Annual Junior Scholars in Intellectual Property (JSIP) Workshop, Michigan State University College of Law, Lansing, MI, May 2012 (commentator); Teaching Consumer Law in a New Economy, University of Houston Law Center, May 2012 (Teaching Advertising as Consumer Protection); 7th Annual Door County IP Academy, IP Section of the Wisconsin State Bar, Sturgeon Bay, WI, July 2012 (SOPA, Using Intermediaries for IP Enforcement, and Other Hot Copyright Topics); Intellectual Property & Internet Law telephonic CLE, Rossdale Group, July 2012 (Hot Topics in Internet Law); Tech Policy Summit, Napa, CA, June 2012 (Online Intermediaries and the Platform Economy); San Francisco Intellectual Property Law Association (SFIPLA) meeting, Healdsburg, CA, June 2012 (Hot Topics in Internet Law); Lawyers’ Guide to Using Social Media for Professional and Client Development, Practicing Law Institute (PLI), San Francisco, May 2012 (Social Media Monitoring and Engagement and Social Media’s Role in Publishing and the Courts); Online Copyright: What You Need to Know, Sunnyvale Public Library, July 2012; Second Annual CSUN Technology Fair, Cal State Northridge, June 2012 (Cloud Computing: Is Anything Private?); American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Annual meeting, Vancouver BC, May 2012 (Reputation Management – Managing Your Online Image).
  • recently announced his new Casebook: “Advertising & Marketing Law: Cases & Materials” by Tushnet & Goldman. Goldman has published a new essay titled, The Irony of Privacy Class Action Lawsuits.
  • started a new blog on Forbes, “Tertium Quid.”
  • was quoted in a Washington Post article about how slow government officials are to prosecute technology companies for antitrust violations. “Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest didn’t exist a decade ago, so think of what it means for an antitrust enforcement action that could take more than 10 years to wind itself down to its logical conclusion,” said Eric Goldman, a professor of technology law at Santa Clara University. “Of course companies also don’t mind using regulators as a weapon against competition, with Microsoft against Google being the example I see most often,” Goldman said.

Pratheepan Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • was quoted in a widely reprinted Bay Area Reporter story about San Francisco’s nudity ban.
  • spoke with the San Jose Mercury News about the power of U.S. Presidents over immigration issues; the story ran in 30 additional outlets. He also talked to the San Francisco Chronicle about a controversial assertion that Obama exceeded his constitutional powers when he eased rules for some undocumented immigrants. His research into the basis for anti-immigrant state laws was cited by an opinion writer at NBC Latino.

Anna Han, Associate Professor of Law

  • appeared on NBC Bay Area News at 7 PM to discuss an escalating dispute between China and Japan, over a group of islands that both countries claim. She also appeared on ABC7 to discuss the closure of the FoxConn factory in China after worker riots.
  • gave a talk to the Faculty and law students of Ningbo University in Ningbo China on May 28th. Her talk was on the “Regulation of US Companies Investing abroad: Export Control and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.”

Marina Hsieh, Senior Fellow

  • served on the Western Association of Schools & Colleges “WASC” accreditation team for the University of California Hastings College of the Law in 2012. The team report and action of the Commission was published in June 2012 here.

Brad Joondeph, Professor of Law

  • his views on Supreme Court’s divisiveness were carried by USA Today, in a story carried in numerous other papers. He also talked to KLIV radio about the upcoming Supreme Court docket.
  • spoke with USA Today about the next Supreme Court session, which starts on October 1, and the divisive issues the court will be taking up. Professor Joondeph predicts Justice Anthony Kennedy will join the conservatives against the affirmative-action program but join the liberals in favor of gay marriage.

Ellen Kreitzberg, Professor of Law

  • was quoted in the Davis Daily Vanguard discussing how Yolo County Spent More than 1.4 Million Dollars Seeking Death Penalty in the case of Marco Topete. (Professor Kreitzberg told the Vanguard she believes the $1.4 million figure is a low number. “I think that’s definitely a low number,” she said.“I’m sure that that does not cover the investigative costs on the District Attorney’s side. It definitely does not cover the costs within the District Attorney’s office both in terms of the attorneys and other additional expenses that it takes to try a capital case.”
  • spoke on Proposition 34, which would ban the death penalty in California at Stanford University for the Haas Center for Public Service: Stanford in government: California Initiatives Night.
  • published the 3rd Edition of Understanding Capital Punishment Law by LexisNexis which includes two new chapters on military death penalty and the Road to Abolition. Kreitzberg has also had several media interviews on Prop 34–the CA initiative to replace the death penalty with life without the possibility of parole including an interview on KCBS radio. Kreitzberg has also spoken locally on Prop 34 at several locations including the San Jose democratic Club, and at various church and community organizations.

Brian Love, Assistant Professor of Law

  • was quoted in The Los Angeles Times regarding the ongoing patent dispute between Apple and Samsung. Read more…
  • had an article posted on TechCrunch.com titled, “Past Unlawful Injunctions Shouldn’t Cloud Samsung Galaxy S III’s Future”, about the next installment of Apple v. Samsung. Read more…
  • was quoted in a story in CNET about Samsung’s claim of jury misconduct in the landmark Apple v. Samsung trial.
  • was quoted in the Korea Times about the ongoing patent dispute between Apple and Samsung.
  • was quoted in the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal speaking about the patent fight between Nest Labs Inc. and Honeywell International Inc., and again in the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal about large tech companies joining together in pools to head off wireless network patent disputes over the most advanced wireless network standard now in use — LTE.
  • spoke to CNET about a judge’s verdict regarding banning Samsung tablets after the company’s loss to Apple in patent litigation.
  • was quoted in a widely-printed article (Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, and many other papers) about the Apple-Samsung verdict. “The best thing for society and for consumers is if all technology companies would take all the money they are spending on lawyers and experts…and instead invest that money in research and design.” Love was also quoted in a San Jose Mercury News article saying the verdict will be “persuasive” in convincing lawyers for other smartphone manufacturers that they could face a fate similar to Samsung’s. That could make them more likely to settle other cases rather than risk going to trial.
  • had an op-ed published in the San Francisco Chronicle titled “Apple, Google – please spend on R&D not IP”, about the patent trial between Apple and Samsung. Read the op-ed…
  • was quoted in a San Francisco Chronicle article about the patent trial between Apple and Samsung. Apple claims that Samsung improperly used design elements from the iPhone and iPad for its own phones and tablets, which Apple says has cost it billions in profit. “I would have expected a case like this to settle long ago,” said Brian Love, assistant professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law. “Going in front of a jury is always a throw of the dice – even more so in a large patent case.” Love said that if the sides were close to a settlement, they might have reached terms this month, when U.S. District Court Judge Lucy Koh granted an injunction against the sale of the Galaxy Tab and ruled that Apple was likely to succeed on the merits of its argument at trial. Love was also quoted talking about the Apple/Samsung trial in a widely-printed AP article, and in the San Jose Mercury News.
  • appeared on (local) ABC News (aired July 30), (national) Japanese TV (NHK’s Ohayoo Nippon (Good Morning Japan), aired July 31), and on KGO 810 AM (aired July 30)–discussing the Apple v. Samsung patent trial in all three.
  • was quoted in a Toronto Star article about BlackBerry maker Research In Motion being slapped with a $147-million (U.S.) patent infringement verdict by a jury in California. Love said it isn’t uncommon for jury decisions to be overturned, adding that the appeals process could take well over a year. “The judge could change the size of the award. The judge could also change whether a piece of evidence should have been allowed or not. Especially with awards in the tens of millions of dollars, they get changed quite a bit,” said Love.
  • his job talk paper was accepted for publication in Volume 161 of the University of Pennsylvania Law Review: An Empirical Study of Patent Litigation Timing: Could A Patent Term Reduction Decimate Trolls Without Harming Innovators? 161 University of Pennsylvania Law Review (forthcoming 2013). An article he co-authored with Chris Seaman was also accepted for publication in Volume 15 of the Yale Journal of Law & Technology: Best Mode Trade Secrets, 15 Yale Journal of Law & Technology (forthcoming November 2012) (with Chris Seaman) (full text). One of Love’s essays was also accepted for publication in the online supplement to Volume 81 of the George Washington Law Review: Why Patentable Subject Matter Matters for Software, 81 George Washington Law Review Arguendo (September 2012) (full text). On May 16, Love’s op-ed was published by the Boston Globe: Facebook IPO Belies Perils of Collegiate Inventors, Boston Globe, May 16, 2012 (full text). Love also Chaired this year’s IP Scholars Conference, which was held at Stanford Law School in August. Brian, Eric Goldman and Colleen Chien all presented papers at the Conference. Love has been quoted in about 3-dozen print and/or online news stories since May.

Ken Manaster, Professor of Law

  • was quoted in two KLIV radio stories about the status of the law known as CEQA, the California Environmental Quality Act.

Cynthia Mertens, Professor of Law

  • was quoted about the contract that obliges the Santa Clara County school board to absorb losses on a condo being sold by a former superintendent. The story ran in the San Jose Mercury News and about two dozen other outlets.

Michelle Oberman, Professor of Law

  • is working toward a book on abortion and the law in El Salvador. The first step involved writing an essay that could serve both as a book chapter and as a free-standing law review publication. Oberman’s essay was accepted for publication in Stanford Law & Policy Review’s Annual Symposium, focused on the 40th Anniversary of Roe v. Wade. The essay is entitled: “Christina’s World: An Unremarkable Story of Poverty, Pregnancy and Abortion Prosecution in El Salvador,” and it will be presented sometime in Spring, 2013. Oberman also has several other forthcoming articles: Michelle Oberman, Getting Past Legal Analysis…or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Teaching Rape, Creighton L. Rev (Forthcoming, 2012); Michelle Oberman, Two Truths and a Lie: In re John Z. and Stories at the Juncture of Teen Sex and the Law (J. of Law & Social Inquiry, Forthcoming, 2012); Michelle Oberman, Book Review: Cliona Rattigan, “What else could I do?” Single Mothers and Infanticide, 1900 – 1950, Irish Academic Press, Dublin, I2012), European Journal for Women’s Studies (forthcoming, 2012); Dawn E. Johnsen, with Michelle Oberman. “Maternal-Fetal Relationship: III. Legal & Regulatory Issues.” In Encyclopedia of Bioethics, edited by Bruce Jennings, et al. New York: Macmillan Library Reference, (forthcoming, 2014).

Tyler Ochoa, Professor of Law

  • was quoted in a story on Lawyers.com about a failed attempt to sue Kanye West for copyright violations.
  • talked to InformationWeek about Oracle’s appeal of an Android lawsuit.
  • talked to ABA Journal about Oklahoma State University “meat specialists” seeking to patent a cut of meat, the Vegas Strip Steak.

Bob Peterson, Professor of Law and Director, Graduate Legal Programs

  • presented a paper to about 200 lawyers on July 27th at the Las Vegas meeting of The Association of California Insurance Companies General Counsel Seminar.  The topic was “New Technology – Old Law:  Autonomous Vehicles and California’s Insurance Framework.” The article is forthcoming in Santa Clara Law Review’s symposium issue devoted to legal issues surrounding self-driving cars.


Cookie Ridolfi, Professor and Director, Northern California Innocence Project

  • spoke at the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers in San Francisco on July 25, 2012. On Thursday, July 26, Vanguard Court Watch of Yolo County honored the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University with their Law School/University of the year award. She also was quoted online about a KVUE (Austin, TX) report alleging the state has fewer cases of prosecutor misconduct than found by NCIP.

Margaret Russell, Professor of Law

  • was quoted in a November 30 ABC News story, picked up by numerous other sites, about the Supreme Court’s inaction on gay-rights cases.
  • spoke to KGO radio and NBC Bay Area about a Supreme Court hearing on the constitutionality of race as a factor in university admissions.

Alan Scheflin, Professor of Law

  • published, How Not to Conduct a Forensic Hypnosis Interview: A Case Study, 55 American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 68 (2012). This article describes a criminal case in which hypnotically refreshed recollection played an important role. After the defendant was convicted, the Wisconsin Innocence Project asked Scheflin to analyze the videotape of the hypnosis session, and then asked him to testify at a post-conviction hearing. The appellate court cited his testimony as a reason to reverse the conviction. Scheflin also published Neil S. Hibler & Alan W. Scheflin, Maximizing the Usefulness of Hypnosis in Forensic Investigative Settings, 55 American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 32 (2012). The article was written for mental health professionals interested in using investigative hypnosis with law enforcement agencies in the effort to enhance the memory of witnesses and victims. Scheflin wrote a new chapter, “Opening Statements and Persuasion,” for his teaching materials in the Opening Statements and Closing Arguments seminar. The materials are being finalized for a book. In Montreal in July, Scheflin gave three presentations at the Annual Conference of the International Cultic Studies Association. The first presentation, provided an analysis of the 900+ appellate cases dealing with brainwashing. The second presentation, Scheflin discussed the problems cult victims face when seeking to enlist the aid of the law in obtaining redress from destructive cults. The third presentation involved a panel discussion with lawyers from the United States, Canada, Belgium, Italy, Switzerland and Japan. The topic involved international legal efforts to deal with cult recruiting, indoctrination and activities.


David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law & Policy

  • was quoted in a widely reprinted San Jose Mercury News article about John McAfee, who is wanted for questioning by Belizean police in connection with the shooting death of his neighbor. McAfee is now in the U.S. “If Belize wants the United States to extradite McAfee to Belize, as a formal matter they have to have brought charges against him in order to request extradition,” Sloss said. “And there has to be an arrest warrant or some sort of charging document with the evidence they would produce in support of those charges.”
  • filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in support of petitioners in the Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum case regarding the Alien Tort Act.
  • talked to Reuters about human rights issues before the U.S. Supreme Court. More than a dozen sites or papers carried the story.
  • has several publications: Domestic Application of Treaties, in The Oxford Guide to Treaties, Duncan Hollis, ed. (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2012); Executing Foster v. Neilson: The Two-Step Approach to Analyzing Self-Executing Treaties, 53 Harvard Int’l L. J. 135 (2012); Legislating Human Rights: The Case for Federal Legislation to Facilitate Domestic Judicial Application of International Human Rights Treaties, 35 Fordham Int’l L. J. 445 (2012). Sloss has also given several presentations: Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, Cambridge University, May 25, 2012 – Presentation on International Law in the U.S. Supreme Court: Continuity and Change Public International Law Discussion Group, Oxford University, May 24, 2012 – Presentation on Domestic Application of Treaties. Sloss has also filed an Amicus Brief in the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co. The brief addresses the extra-territorial application of the Alien Tort Statute. (June 2012).

Gerald Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • spoke to the Contra Costa Times about the legal issues that led to a murder suspect having charges dismissed. Numerous other Bay Area publications carried the story.
  • talked to The Recorder about what may happen if Prop. 34 fails.
  • talked to the Recorder and the Los Angeles Times about the first year of California Justice Goodwin Liu and California Lawyer about Prop. 34.
  • talked to the Santa Barbara Independent about Prop. 34 and to the Santa Cruz Sentinel about the 10th anniversary of a famed marijuana bust.
  • was quoted in a widely re-printed San Jose Mercury News article about the priest-beating trial of Will Lynch. Lynch’s supporters are calling on District Attorney Jeff Rosen to bring perjury charges against the accused priest for lying under oath that he never molested Will Lynch and his brother. “There’s no legal reason they couldn’t bring perjury charges,” said Gerald Uelmen, a former federal prosecutor who teaches at the Santa Clara University School of Law. But Uelmen said such a trial would be a “circus” that would do little to protect children in the long run. “The whole reason Will Lynch went to trial was to expose the priest,” Uelmen said. “I’d say he achieved that, and case closed.”

Tseming Yang, Professor of Law

  • wrote an op-ed piece on the climate change negotiations in Doha, Qatar which was published by CNN.com

Emeritus Faculty News July – December 2012

Howard Anawalt, Professor Emeritus

  • set up a website with several features related to law. The website covers: IP law and Idea Rights, the power of corporations in government, and a feature called “Silicon Law.” Anawalt hopes that fellow commentators, especially from Silicon Valley, will take a shot at this blog from time to time. The blog also contains the new matter for Anawalt’s book, Idea Rights. The link to the book is: anawalt.com/wordpress/?page_id=34. In July, the 2012 edition of Anawalt’s IP Strategy (West) came out. The new edition contains among other things detailed and integrated coverage of the “America Invents Act” (AIA).

Clinical Faculty News July – December 2012

Angelo Ancheta, Executive Director, Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center and Associate Clinical Professor

  • was quoted in InsideHigherEd about the affirmative action case before the Supreme Court, Fisher v. UT, for which he wrote an amicus brief.  His comments during a conference held of the American Educational Research Association was also covered in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education and Congressional Quarterly.
  • received funding of $24,333 from The State Bar of California Legal Services Trust Fund Program to support the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center. The Legal Services Trust Fund grant will allow the Center to continue to provide legal services in the areas of workers’ rights, immigration and consumer protections matters to low-income persons in the south Bay Area.

Northern California Innocence Project

  • A conference on prosecutorial misconduct hosted by NCIP was covered by the San Jose Mercury News and carried in more than a dozen other publications.
  • Paige Kaneb, Assistant Clinical Professor, and 2L student Dustin Seesemann were interviewed for San Jose State University’s weekly TV news show, Update News, about their work freeing people who were wrongfully convicted from prison.
  • Maitreya Badami, Assistant Clinical Professor, spoke at the San Jose Rotary Club on July 25, 2012.
  • Paige Kaneb, Assistant Clinical Professor, gave a presentation with NCIP exoneree, Maurice Caldwell, to Mill Valley Seniors for Peace in Marin County. The average age of the audience was 87 years. NCIP has since received donations and well wishes from members of the organization. Ms. Kaneb and Kelley Fleming, CDP Attorney, spoke to a group of high school students from around the country who were participating in the Lead America Program at Stanford University.
  • Linda Starr, Associate Clinical Professor and Legal Director of NCIP was interviewed by the League of Women Voters for their televised program on current issues, to be shown later this fall.

Lynette Parker, Associate Clinical Professor, Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center

  • was on KTVU discussing the limits of Prop. 35 as a tool to halt human trafficking.
  • was co-author on an op-ed in the San Jose Mercury News, arguing that Proposition 35 is not a good measure to prevent human trafficking, because it is too broad, vague, and legally ambiguous and could lead to unintended negative consequences.

LARAW Faculty News July – December 2012

Ray Bernstein, Associate Clinical Professor of Law

  • was among a group of about thirty advocates for transgender rights who recently met with Obama Administration officials to observe Transgender Day of Remembrance and to discuss topics of concern in transgender communities. A range of areas where government action could improve people’s lives were discussed. As a board member of Transgender Law Center, Professor Bernstein spoke about employment issues. (TLC won the recent EEOC decision recognizing that discrimination based on transgender status is a form of sex discrimination prohibited by Title VII.)

Yvonne Ekern, Associate Clinical Professor of Law

  • 2nd edition of her Constitutional Law: Principles & Practice text was published this spring by Delmar (a division of West Law Publishing). The text was co-authored by Santa Clara Law Legal Analysis, Research & Writing Instructor Joanne Banker-Hames.

John Schunk, Associate Clinical Professor


Adjunct Faculty News July – December 2012

Ruth Silver Taube, Lecturer

  • wrote an op-ed for the San Jose Mercury News on the anniversary of the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.
  • KGACLC Workers’ Rights Supervising Attorney and Special Counsel to the Legal Aid Society, participated as an expert witness during Santa Clara County’s Most Vulnerable Workers Public Forum.  The forum was organized by the Human Relations Commission and the Commission on the Status of Women, and it was held at the Mexican Heritage Plaza Pavilion on May 10, 2012. Taube presented information and statistics based on the data collected from KGACLC’s Workers’ Rights Clinic.  This data revealed egregious abuses on the part of many Santa Clara County employers that ranged from wage theft, discrimination and illegal termination. She also presented data regarding KGACLC’s human trafficking cases – a growing problem in Santa Clara County and beyond. The event was well attended by a diverse audience that included low-income workers, community activists, religious leaders, non-profit organizations and the media. The testimony gathered will be used to publish a report to inform the County Board of Supervisors of key issues impacting vulnerable workers in our community.

Faculty News January – June 2012

Vangie Abriel, Director, Legal Analysis, Research and Writing

  • selected as an Appellate Lawyer Representative by the United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Appellate lawyer representatives serve three-year terms, during which they participate in meetings throughout the circuit, coordinate activities with District Lawyer Representatives, and attend and participate in the Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference, an annual gathering of federal judges, attorneys, agency representatives and court staff.

Angelo Ancheta, Director, Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center

  • gave the keynote address at “Redrawing the Maps: Redistricting, Race and Representation in the Next Decade” , a symposium on January 28, 2012 at Stanford Law School. Read more…
  • received additional funding of $27,922 from County of Santa Clara to support the “Unmet Civil Legal Services Program”. The total funds awarded over three years is $86,868. This additional funding brings total funding received to date to $58,946. This is the second year of an anticipated three-year award.

Patricia Cain, Professor of Law

  • quoted in New York Times Bucks blog story about how well commercial tax software can handle the complex tax situations of married same-sex couples.
  • quoted in a recent Huffington Post article on tax discrimination against LGBT couples and families. Read the article…
  • quoted in a Bay Area Reporter story about how the federal Defense of Marriage Act complicates divorces between same-sex couples.

Colleen Chien, Assistant Professor of Law

  • appeared in dozens of publications or sites, after discussing patent litigation issues involving Apple, Oracle and Google with Reuters and Wired magazine.
  • quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle (April 25, 2012) about the patent lawsuit between Oracle and Google.
  • quoted in the New York Times (April 10, 2012). These days, big companies are increasingly using patents as strategic tools, said Colleen Chien, an assistant professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law. The specialist patent holders, sometimes called trolls, are still around, but the main litigation and deal-making now are among big companies themselves, Professor Chien said. “These major companies are using patents to gain competitive advantage rather than just seeing patents as financial assets,” she said.
  • quoted in InsideCounsel about the rising patent wars among corporations.
  • quoted in a Reuters story that ran in over 50 sites or publications worldwide, about how Facebook was the target of opportunistic patent lawsuits just before its massive filing for an initial public stock offering.
  • commentary appeared in 148 publications and websites after she talked to Reuters and the San Jose Mercury News about the patent lawsuit Yahoo brought against Facebook.

Stephen Diamond, Associate Professor of Law

  • talked to USA Today about Facebook’s falling stock price, a story that ran in about 55 outlets. He also was in a number of widely reprinted MarketWatch stories about the risks and future of Facebook.
  • was on ABC 7 news talking about investor lawsuits and regulatory investigations over Facebook’s IPO. He also spoke to MarketWatch.com about Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s changing role post-IPO.
  • quoted in widely-reprinted articles in USA Today, the San Jose Mercury News and MarketWatch.com on the scandal involving embattled Yahoo CEO Scott Thompson, who has come under fire for a resume that inaccurately stated that he holds a degree in computer science.
  • published Rights and Revolution: The Rise and Fall of Nicaragua’s Sandinista Movement, Vandeplas Publishing (forthcoming 2012) and From ‘Che’ to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy, Vandeplas Publishing, 2009. His chapter on “Beyond the Berle-Means Paradigm: Private Equity and the New Capitalist Order, was published in The Embedded Firm, Cynthia Williams and Peer Zumbansen, eds. Cambridge University Press, 2011. Diamond is currently working on two papers titled, Why Haven’t We Solved the “Corporate Governance” Problem? and Fictitious Capital and the Framing of Corporate Law. He also published The Facebook Effect: Secondary Markets and Insider Trading in Today’s Startup Environment. Business Law News, U.C. Berkeley (forthcoming 2012) and Grappling with Corporate Personality, Dissent Online, (forthcoming 2012).
  • quoted in MarketWatch. Once companies have lost their edge, can they ever climb back? In the case of H-P, RIM and Yahoo, the outlook appears to be the best for H-P, worse for RIM, and Yahoo could eventually just be sold, or cut up into bits. “They have moved to the carcass phase of the business. That is a very bad sign. That is very interesting for lawyers and vulture funds. But to expect those companies to turn around technologically is all but impossible. H-P may have narrowly averted that,” he said, adding that he believes the tech giant needs to eventually find a more visionary CEO with more tech or engineering creds, or it too will lose its way.”
  • quoted in a widely reprinted San Jose Mercury News story about defections from H-P’s board of directors, and in a MarketWatch story about the enormity and importance of Facebook’s IPO.
  • wrote the cover story for California Business Law Practitioner about the new realities of insider trading, including secondary market trading in stocks that aren’t yet publicly traded.

David Friedman, Professor of Law

  • gave the following talks around the nation: Legal Systems Very Different From Ours; What is Economics, and What Does it Have to Do With Law?; Schelling Points and Self-Enforcing Contracts; Market Failure on the Failure of Law; Market Failure: An Argument Both For and Against Government; Should We Abolish the Criminal Law; and The Market for Law. He is currently working on a book titled, Legal Systems Very Different From Ours.
  • blogged in Healthcare Blog about the downside of genetic testing from an insurance perspective.

Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law

  • was quoted in a Bloomberg News story about doctor health exchanges.
  • was quoted in Wired‘s Autopia blog about the privacy implications of billboard ads customized to particular drivers. KHON-TV picked up the story.

Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Director, High Tech Law Institute

  • appeared in 70 sites or papers after talking to Reuters about Google’s approach to European antitrust regulators, and in numerous outlets after talking to the New York Times about “sponsored stories” on Facebook. He was also quoted in other tech-law stories in MediaPost, Wired and elsewhere.
  • was quoted in the New York Times and The Recorder about Facebook users whose posts for products become ads featuring their Facebook photos, as well as other stories on tech-law issues.
  • talked to California Watch for a story on government and companies building alliances to combat sex trafficking and MediaPost.com about advertisers’ campaign against “rogue” sites.
  • quoted in the Chicago Tribune (April 6, 2012) about a recent U.S. appeals court reversal of a lower court ruling that revives lawsuits by Viacom and other media companies over the use of copyrighted videos on Google’s YouTube service without permission. “It’s hard to characterize this as anything other than a loss for Google, and potentially a significant one. It has given new life to a case that Google thought was dead.”
  • wrote a recent article in Ars Technica about a defamation case involving Wikipedia. Read the article…
  • quoted in numerous tech-law stories, including a widely reprinted Bloomberg story about Google’s ability to combat malware on its Android phone apps, and an ABC News story about two Kentucky women who allege their reputations were destroyed by online attacks.
  • quoted in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Warren’s Washington Internet Daily, CNET  and Above the Law about SOPA; InformationWeek about Oracle’s rejection of a $272 million SAP award over copyright infringement; and National Law Journal, about who owns a person’s Twitter account.
  • shortlisted as an “IP Thought Leader” nominee by Managing Intellectual Property for their 2012 IP awards. Read more…
  • quoted in a San Francisco Chronicle and BusinessWeek story about the arrest of the founder of Megaupload for copyright infringement. He also talked to The Wall Street Journal about an unusual “sting” to capture misdeeds by Google ad-sales employees. He appeared in dozens of other stories after talking to KQED’s Marketplace, InsideCounsel, The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, AP, Los Angeles Times, and others about Megaupload, SOPA, and other tech-law issues.
  • quoted in a story in USA Today and more than a dozen other papers, discussing a lawsuit brought by Chik-fil-A. He was also quoted in Computerworld, discussing the conclusion of a lawsuit against Google for its Google Maps; and in the Toronto Star discussing the patent lawsuit brought by Yahoo against Facebook.

Kyle Graham, Assistant Professor of Law

  • spoke to CBS 5 about how prosecutors in the Sierra LaMar case can proceed without a victim’s body. Watch the clip…
  • talked to KQED News and was quoted by the San Jose Mercury News about a Supreme Court decision that law enforcement cannot place GPS devices on suspects’ cars without a warrant. He said that said courts will now have to sort out the limits on “reasonable” police use of GPS tracking to ensure that even with a warrant it doesn’t allow “unfettered monitoring of suspects’ movements.”

Deep Gulasekaram, Assistant Professor of Law

  • was quoted by KCBS radio and in the San Francisco Chronicle about the Supreme Court’s invalidation of much of Arizona’s anti-illegal-immigration law.
  • his research was quoted in the Los Angeles Daily Journal in an article titled, California Opposing Arizona Immigration Law which discussed how California entities are arguing that the recent Arizona immigration law passed will hurt police efforts in the community.
  • co-wrote an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times about Arizona’s immigration enforcement law being heard before the Supreme Court.
  • quoted in a Contra Costa Times story about efforts by the American Legion to utilize local police to enforce federal immigration laws.

Anna Han, Associate Professor of Law

  • quoted in an article by Reuters regarding a Chinese company’s efforts to prevent Apple from using the iPad name in China. She was on a local NBC news station, PBS Money Talk and KCBS radio to discuss the case. Han also appeared on KQED’s Forum talking about the recent visit of China’s vice president. She recently published a casebook Doing Business in China: Cases and Materials and is currently working on the statutory supplement and teachers’ manual.
  • was a guest on KQED’s Forum on February 16 discussing the visit of Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping. Listen to the clip…
  • spoke to Corporate Counsel magazine about Apple’s legal troubles related to its labor practices in Asian factories.

David Hasen, Associate Professor of Law

  • received a one-year funding of $75,000 from the Internal Revenue Service’s Low Income Taxpayer Clinic Program to support Santa Clara University Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic to be run by Caroline Chen at the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center. The clinic expects to provide services for individual, sole proprietor and single-person S-corporation taxpayers in any federal tax controversy.

Marina Hsieh, Senior Fellow

  • spoke on a panel Cultivating Leaders: What Role Should Law Schools Play in Preparing Effective Lawyer-Leaders? along with co-author of the Carnegie report Judith Wegner and Cincinnati College of Law Dean Lou Bilionis. The April 13-14 conference on Law and Leadership was co-sponsored by Elon University School of Law and the Center for Creative Leadership in Greensboro, NC and featured keynotes by David Gergen and Hon. Sandra Day O’Connor.

Brad Joondeph, Professor of Law

  • appeared in about 50 papers or sites after talking to USA Today about the Supreme Court’s upcoming decision on President Obama ‘s health care law.
  • wrote on op-ed on CNN.com about the Supreme Court hearings over the national health-care law. In the op-ed, Professor Joondeph states that several of the justices seem inclined to strike down the entire Affordable Care Act. Professor Joondeph writes: “This would be extraordinary. It would mark the first time in almost 80 years that the court invalidated such a significant federal law as exceeding Congress’ enumerated powers. It would also be the first time since the 1930s that it used the unconstitutionality of a law’s single provision to strike down a hugely important law in its entirety.”
  • quoted in U.S.A. Today about the Supreme Court hearings over the national health-care law, a case that has been likened to the Court’s review of the income tax system in 1895, the Social Security Act in 1937 and the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts in 1964-65. “It’s an incredible case study about the role of the court. When do the justices feel it’s their role to step in and essentially overrule the judgment of the political process?”
  • quoted in the New York Times on questions of whether Justice Clarence Thomas and Justice Elena Kagan could remain impartial to the outcome of the Supreme Court hearing over the national health-care law. Justice Thomas’ wife is a consultant for tea party groups that oppose the law, and Kagan was President Obama’s solicitor general during the start of the legal fight over the health care legislation. Professor Joondeph said that while he saw no need for either justice’s recusal, he believes it is unrealistic to think the court could fully insulate itself from outside pressures. “There’s no way for human beings to screen out the rest of the world on a decision like this,” Mr. Joondeph said. “This just sort of stands out as one of those cases where the institutional stature of the court is on the line.”
  • quoted in a Politico story analyzing who on the Supreme Court is the most influential justice for the coming hearing over the national health-care law. He was also quoted by Inside CMS about the health care law’s legal challenges.
  • quoted in a Politico story about the four major issues in the Supreme Court’s upcoming hearings on the federal Affordable Care Act.

Ellen Kreitzberg, Professor of Law

  • spoke with public radio about a proposed ballot initiative to abolish the death penalty in California. Listen online…
  • was interviewed by KLIV and Los Angeles radio station KPPC on a proposed law to do away with the death penalty in favor of life without parole.

Kerry Macintosh, Professor of Law

  • will soon publish her book, Human Cloning in the Stone Age.

Scott Maurer, Supervising Attorney, Consumer Law, Katharine and George Alexander Law Center

  • talked to California Watch about allegedly dishonest debt-collection process servers.

Gary Neustadter, Professor of Law

  • was cited by California Watch and an ABC story about people whose homes were foreclosed are still being dunned for their second mortgages. The stories ran on about 16 sites or stations.

Michelle Oberman, Professor of Law

  • quoted in a story on Women’s eNews about common elements among mothers who kill their children.

Tyler Ochoa, Professor of Law

  • talked to IDG News Service for two stories about Oracle’s loss and chances of appeal in the Android copyright case.
  • quoted in the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune, the San Jose Mercury News, the EE Times, KQED and Ars Technica about allegations that Google infringed Oracle Corp.’s patents and copyrights to build its Android mobile software, which now powers more than 300 million mobile devices. The stories were carried by about 38 sites or papers.
  • quoted in two MediaPost stories about efforts by broadcasters to shut down a service that allows people to watch TV shows on their computer.

Lynette Parker, Supervising Attorney, Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center

  • received an Unsung Hero Award from the Victim Support Network for Santa Clara County on April 24. The award honored Parker’s 12 years of work with immigration clients as well as her mentoring and supervision of law students. The Victim Support Network is an association of victim service professionals who strive to enhance the quantity and quality of services for crime victims in Santa Clara County. Among other things, the network advocates for improvements in the area of law enforcement and the criminal justice system. Read more…

Cookie Ridolfi, Professor of Law

  • A Mercury News story on wrongful convictions, which ran in two dozen other outlets as well, cited the Northern California Innocence Project and featured a photo including Cookie Ridolfi (NCIP).
  • was quoted in the Bay Citizen about defendants not being told of contradictory evidence in a murder case.
  • was awarded a Hackworth Grant for Research in Applied Ethics by the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University. The grant of $5,000 was given to support work called “Prosecutorial Ethics Curriculum.” Professor Ridolfi, who is Director of the Northern California Innocence Project, is working with her peers at the Project to address the problem of prosecutorial misconduct. In addition to research on the instances of practices like improper argument and the use of false evidence, Professor Ridolfi and her team will be developing teaching modules keyed to each common type of prosecutorial misconduct.

Margaret Russell, Professor of Law

  • quoted in a story in the San Jose Mercury News and 12 other papers, about moves by supporters of Prop. 8 to seek a 9th Circuit review of a recent circuit panel decision. She also talked to the Mercury News about a Morgan Hill woman who claimed police posted an illicit picture of her to her Facebook page.
  • was cited in more than 100 stories about the Prop. 8 case, via stories in the Los Angeles Times, San Jose Mercury News, ABC News, The Atlantic Monthly, Bay Citizen, and Newsradio95.com. She also was quoted in a widely reprinted San Jose Mercury News article about allegations that a police officer arresting a woman also posted a risqué photo of her on her Facebook page from her cell phone.

Alan Scheflin, Professor of Law

  • Scheflin, a national leader on the topic of mind and behavior control, was mentioned in a lengthy CNN story about efforts by Sirhan Sirhan defense lawyers to get a new trial based on research by Scheflin and an alleged, newly discovered tape recording of the 1968 shooting of RFK. The story was picked up in more than 60 additional sites or publications. Read more…

David Sloss, Professor of Law and Director, Center for Global Law and Policy

  • published “Legislating Human Rights: The Case for Federal Legislation to Facilitate Domestic Judicial Application of International Human Rights Treaties,” 35 Fordham Int’l L.J. 445 (2012) and “Executing Foster v. Neilson: The Two-Step Approach to Analyzing Self-Executing Treaties,” 53 Harv. Int’l L.J. (forthcoming 2012). Sloss also published a book chapter in titled, “Domestic Application of Treaties,” in The Oxford Guide to Treaties, (Duncan B. Hollis, ed.) (Oxford Univ. Press 2012). He also submitted an amicus brief to the U.S. Supreme Court in December 2011 on behalf of Navi Pillay, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, in the case of Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co., No. 10-1491.
  • His book, International Law in the U.S. Supreme Court, has been awarded a Certificate of Merit by the American Society of International Law. His award goes to a work of “high technical craftsmanship and utility to practicing lawyers and scholars.” The award will be presented at the end of March at the Annual Meeting of the Society.
  • appeared on the NBC Bay Area show California Nonstop, discussing the situation in North Korea with the death of leader Kim Jong Il.

Gary Spitko, Professor of Law

  • will be publishing Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: Employment Discrimination as a Means for Social Cleansing, in 16 Employee Rights and Employment Policy Journal (forthcoming 2012).

Gerald Uelmen, Professor of Law

  • quoted in a widely reprinted San Jose Mercury News article (May 21) about a new national report on the number of people falsely convicted of a serious crime. Uelmen said the report shows little progress has been made since he was executive director of the California Commission on the Fair Administration of Justice, which examined ways to guard against wrongful convictions. “The bottom line is we are not doing much better in protecting the innocent,” he said, “de-spite all the evidence uncovered in the past 10 years of wrongful convictions.”
  • quoted in a Chicago Tribune story about an expected increase in funding for videotaping interrogations of crime suspects, and in an Associated Press story, picked up by 28 outlets, about debates over the California death penalty.

Beth Van Schaack, Professor of Law

  • will become the Deputy to the U.S. Ambassador-At-Large for War Crimes Issues in late March. She will be taking a leave of absence from teaching to serve as the Deputy to Ambassador Stephen Rapp, and will help run the State Department’s Office of Global Criminal Justice. Formerly called the Office of War Crimes Issues, this office advises Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and, through the inter-agency process, helps formulate U.S. responses to atrocities committed throughout the world. Professor Van Schaack’s portfolio will include working with international tribunals, NGOs, and foreign governments to ensure accountability for international crimes, via transitional justice mechanisms that include not only prosecutions, but also truth commissions and commissions of inquiry.
  • News that she is going to the U.S. State Department to help respond to war crimes was featured in the Oakland Tribune and the blog Political Blotter.

Stephanie Wildman, Professor of Law

  • (with Deborah Moss-West) spoke on March 16, 2012 as part of a panel on Teaching and Practicing 21st Century Social Justice Lawyering at a UC Hastings College of Law Conference on Representing the Vulnerable and Remembering Ralph Abascal: Lessons from the 1970s.

Bill Woodward, Visiting Professor of Law

  • was a panelist in February at the UC Hastings School of Law Symposium on Mandatory Arbitration. He spoke about the economic loss doctrine and about the ethics and professionalism issues that arise when drafting contracts at the ABA Business Law Section Meeting in March. Woodward is the incoming Chair of the Pro Bono Committee of the ABA Business Law Section. He will publish a chapter titled, “American Bankruptcy Law” in an Italian treatise on comparative bankruptcy and an article titled, Restitution Without Context: An Examination of the Losing Contract Problem in the Restatement (Third) of Restitution.

David Yosifon, Associate Professor of Law

  • His op-ed titled “Discouraging job creation overseas could backfire on the U.S.” ran in The San Jose Mercury News and its affiliate papers. Read the op-ed…
  • quoted in The Recorder about a solo lawyer’s conflicts of interest in taking on a former client of his old firm.


Faculty News – 2011

Eric Goldman’s Technology & Marketing Law Blog was named runner-up for the prize of Best Law Professor Blog on Dennis Kennedy’s 2011 “Blawggie Awards” . This award complements those he received in 2008 and 2010.

Colleen Chien and a co-author had an oped published in the New York Times online, explaining that the International Trade Commission’s current methods of handling patent disputes puts consumers at risk of not getting certain products, such as certain Android cell phones, at Christmastime.

Patricia Cain was quoted at length in a New York Times “Bucks” blog, about the IRS’s incongruous treatment of the adoption tax credit for a same-sex couple, in which one of the partners adopts the other’s biological child. The Advocate wrote about the story and Cain’s comments. Read more…

Eric Goldman was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News story, reprinted in about three dozen publications or sites, about “SOPA,” a legislative proposal for imposing penalties for piracy online, which many feel is threatening online content overall.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in an Associated Press story that ran in more than 180 publications or sites, about a rare California Supreme Court decision overturning a death penalty verdict.

A paper by Stephen Diamond and a co-author, about how the New York Stock Exchange is less transparent now that its ownership structure has changed, was mentioned in the blogs Securities Prof Law Blog and Environmental Law Professors.

Bradley Joondeph talked to USA Today and the National Journal about how and why the Supreme Court’s justices are likely to view the first challenge to Obama’s health care law that has been accepted for hearing by the top U.S. court.

Stephen Diamond talked to ABC7 about Zynga’s attempts to recoup some stock options from employees in advance of its IPO.

Eric Goldman was quoted in a New York Times story, reprinted in at least 20 other outlets, about a settlement between Facebook and the Federal Trade Commission over privacy abuses. He and a co-author were also quoted in MediaPost about their letter opposing a new rule by the Copyright Office that could expose websites to devastating costs just for failing to renew certain paperwork every two years.

Linda Starr was quoted in a Los Angeles Times story, which ran in a handful of other papers or websites, about an imprisoned Modesto man who will get another chance to seek a retrial in a murder case.

Beth Van Schaack wrote an op-ed that ran in the San Jose Mercury News entitled “Guantánamo hearing shows stark deficiencies of military justice”. Read more…

Bradley Joondeph was quoted in a Bloomberg Business Week story on the likelihood that the Supreme Court would take up constitutional questions around the federal Affordable Care Act.

Gerald Uelmen talked to the Los Angeles Times about the “gangbusters” opinion that allowed backers of California Prop. 8 to defend it in court, even though lawyers for the state of California will not.

Colleen Chien was quoted in eWeek about a court decision against Rambus, saying companies that rely too heavily on litigation success for their business model are taking a big risk. She also was quoted in The Recorder about the lack of transparency at certain patent auctions, a story that was picked up by Corporate Counsel magazine.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in the Jewish Chronicle about when free speech crosses the line into hate speech on campus.

Stephen Diamond talked to MarketWatch about the conditions behind Groupon’s IPO. He also appeared on KGO-ABC7 TV to discuss questionable moves by Zynga to recoup stock options granted to early employees.

Patricia Cain was quoted in a Tax Notes story about the IRS agreeing to allow sex reassignment surgery and hormone therapy as deductible medical expenses.

A study of county prison usage by David Ball was featured in a story in the legal publication the Daily Journal.

Colleen Chien was quoted in a story that ran in MocoNews and paidContent.org, about why tech companies try to ignore patent issues at the innovation stage of creating new products.

Eric Goldman was quoted by MediaPost on a suit by the New York Times over the right of Huffington Post to name a blog Parentlode.

Two Santa Clara Law professors spoke to Bay Area Channel 2 news on November 8. David Ball talked about the American Muslim student who was tracked by the police with GPS tracking and sued, and Deep Gulasekaram spoke about a 30-year-old undocumented man being deported. The man has been here since 1995 when he applied for political asylum, which has been denied.

Watch the David Ball clip
Watch the Deep Gulasekaram clip

Beth Van Schaack visited Guantánamo Bay to witness first criminal military-tribunal proceeding under the Obama Administration. The proceedings were fraught with complex legal implications, as Prof. Van Schaack shares in her blog.

An Associated Press story quoting Stephen Diamond about HP’s reversal of its decision to split off its computer division (which he likened to “dividing Siamese twins”) ran in nearly 500 sites and publications, in cities like Ft. Wayne, Ind., Albuquerque, N.M. and Memphis, Tenn., as well as international papers such as the Toronto Star, Kenya Star and Pakistan Observer.

Colleen Chien talked to Politico about the increasing, controversial role of the ITC, which has the power to block access to U.S. markets, in patent litigation.

Tyler Ochoa was quoted in BNA Patent, Trademark & Copyright Law Daily on the unusual lawsuit by artists seeking to obtain a share of revenue from paintings when they are re-sold to a second buyer by the first buyer.

Bradley Joondeph was quoted in Politico about the likelihood and implications of a Supreme Court review of the constitutionality of the individual mandate in the federal health reform law. California Healthline carried the story as well. Also, the National Law Journal and the popular blog SCOTUSblog mentioned Joondeph’s blog as being “very useful” and “the go-to place” for those following challenges to the national health law. Read the National Law Journal article…

Deep Gulasekaram was quoted in the Christian Science Monitor about challenges to Alabama’s tough new immigration law.

Anna Han was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News story about Chinese company Alibaba hoping to buy Yahoo.

Beth Van Schaack was quoted in Ethical Corporation about a September court ruling that curtails the ability of international human rights activists to bring claims against multinational companies in U.S. courts.

Catherine Sandoval now has a wikipedia page: wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_Sandoval

Colleen Chien was quoted in a Reuters story, which ran in 85 papers or sites, noting that Steve Jobs’ death is not likely to slow the patent war between Apple and Samsung. She also was quoted in a story that ran in Nature magazine and Scientific American, about the increased risk to biotechnology firms of lawsuits by patent “trolls” whose main purpose as a business is to collect money using patents they’ve purchased.

The news that the Northern California Innocence Project/a> helped free a Los Angeles man wrongfully imprisoned for 17 years was carried in 380 newspapers, websites or blogs across the country, via an Associated Press story and two L.A. Times stories. Cookie Ridolfi and Maurice Possley wrote an oped for the San Jose Mercury News about how attorney misconduct is not being reported to the California Bar Association as required by law.

Deep Gulasekaram was interviewed twice on KLIV radio, about why the U.S. Supreme Court is likely to take on controversial immigration issues in the upcoming term, and about the federal crackdown on California medical marijuana dispensaries.

Bradley Joondeph was interviewed on KLIV radio about the Supreme Court’s upcoming term.

Congratulations to Linda Starr, who was named to the Daily Journal‘s top lawyers of 2011 list! Read more…

Congratulations to Eric Goldman, who has just been announced as one of the winners of the prestigious California Bar 2011 IP Vanguard Awards (academic/policy category). The awards “honor outstanding legal professionals who are spearheading new developments in the world of intellectual property.” Read more…

Colleen Chien, a published author, scholar, and expert on U.S. and international patent law, was invited to attend President Obama’s signing of the long-awaited patent-reform law Friday, Sept. 16 in Alexandria, Va. More…

Colleen Chien and Obama

Colleen Chien

An op-ed by Deep Gulasekaram about the California Dream Act ran in the San Jose Mercury News on Sept. 15, 2011. Read more…

Beth Van Schaack has received a President’s Award from Santa Clara University for excellent in teaching and scholarship. The award was announced and made on September 13 at the Faculty Convocation marking the beginning of the university’s new academic year.

The San Jose Mercury News ran a feature story on the “Trial of Our Century,” the re-enactment by the Law School of the trial of famed defense attorney Clarence Darrow on charges of jury tampering a century ago. The story noted Don Polden’s skill at portraying the “slimy” bribe-fixer, Bert Franklin, and cited an essay on the ethics of the trial by Gerald Uelmen.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in a widely reprinted Los Angeles Times story about the odds against Prop. 8 backers being denied the right to argue for the voter proposition in court. He also was quoted in a National Public Radio story, which ran in numerous major markets across the U.S., about how Catholics generally continue to support the death penalty.

Gary Neustadter was quoted in a Mercury News article about the bankruptcy of Salinas electric-car company Green Vehicles.

Stephen Diamond was quoted in several Associated Press stories about HP’s surprise move to hire Meg Whitman. The stories ran in over 300 venues including Forbes, Boston Globe, Austin American-Statesman, Huffington Post and Miami Herald.

Eric Goldman was quoted in dozens of publications including the Pittsburgh Tribune Review, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, New York Times and the San Jose Mercury News about subjects including Google CEO Eric Schmidt testifying in Washington, D.C. on antitrust issues, legal battles between SAP and Oracle; and a rare Twitter stalking case.

A columnist with the Oakland Tribune discussed research by David Ball showing that counties make disproportionate use of prison space, and some may be rewarded for their overuse in the new realignment plan underway in California.

Deep Gulasekaram was interviewed on KFWB AM in Los Angeles, about a fundraiser for his nonprofit Project Heart, which raises money to reverse heart disease in East African children.

Margaret Russell discussed the decision by Judge Ware to release videotapes of the Prop. 8 trial with the legal publication Daily Journal.

Jesuit.org noted the creation of SCU’s new low-income taxpayer clinic, through which students will represent taxpayers in disputes with tax officials. The item mentioned the new clinic director Caroline Tso Chen.

Bradley Joondeph spoke to the Wall Street Journal and New York Times about a federal appeals court setback to the Obama Administration’s health-care law, the Affordable Care Act (ACA). He also wrote an essay cited by SCOTUSblog on the constitutionality of ACA.

Colleen Chien was quoted in an Associated Press story about the “patent arms race” that was behind Google’s recent $12.5 billion purchase of Motorola Mobility. The story ran in 68 papers or websites nationwide.

Research into county prison usage by David Ball continued to receive coverage, in the San Bernardino Sun, Inland Daily Bulletin, Oakland Tribune, San Jose Mercury News, and the Santa Cruz Sentinel.

Eric Goldman was featured in numerous tech-law stories, notably those on the Google settlement with the Justice Department and on antitrust interest in Google’s Motorola purchase. Stories, some of which were reprinted dozens of times, ran in the New York Times, Reuters, and Inside Higher Ed.

Tyler T. Ochoa and Professor H. Tomas Gomez-Arostegui of Lewis and Clark Law School have submitted an Amici Curaie brief to the Supreme Court that explores the history of the copyright laws in the United States and Great Britain in support of the petitioners in Golan v Holder. The case challenges the constitutionality of Congress restoring copyright of foreign works that were previously in the United States public domain. The case potentially affects the copyright status of millions of copyrighted works.

Colleen Chien explains “How to Turn the Table on Patent Trolls” in a Forbes op-ed. Also check out Prof. Chien’s recent scholarly article on the patent ecosystem.

Marina Hsieh was interviewed by NBC’s Damian Trujillo about the legality of a San Jose restaurant and bar’’s controversial dress code. The NAACP and Latino Leadership Alliance raised concerns that the code was a proxy for race discrimination. She also will conclude a 4-year term on the CA State Bar’s Council on Access and Fairness in mid-September.

Eric Goldman was consulted for numerous tech-law articles, including an Economist article questioning what the FTC could be probing in its action against Google; a widely reprinted Seattle Times story about a woman who sued her ex-boyfriend over his Facebook posts; and a Mashable.com story on a consumer who secretly took photos of Apple customers via computers in a store.

Anna Han was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News story, which appeared in more than two dozen publications, about the difficulties faced by Facebook and others trying to operate in China’s censoring marketplace.

KLIV Radio interviewed Patricia Cain about the legal issues families should consider when it comes to end of life issues.

KLIV Radio interviewed Margaret Russell about repealing the Defense of Marriage Act.

Colleen Chien was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News story about Microsoft pursuing patent lawsuits against Android phone and tablet manufacturers using Nortel patents. The story appeared in well over a dozen other publications and sites.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in a widely reprinted San Jose Mercury News story about the negative impact of Gov. Brown’s delay in filling the state Supreme Court vacancy.

A lengthy interview of Patricia Cain about the complex and contradictory tax requirements for married same-sex couples was featured on KQED-FM. Cain also talked to Going Concern and Bay Citizen about the issue, and to Bay Area Reporter about how bankruptcy courts are recognizing the rights of same-sex couples despite a federal law to the contrary.

Margaret Russell spoke to KQED Forum about the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down a California law that had sought to restrict purchases of violent video games by minors.

Bradley Joondeph was interviewed by KCBS and KNX (in Los Angeles) about the Supreme Court’s ruling to strike down a California law restricting purchases of violent video games by minors.

Don Polden was quoted in an NPR Morning Edition story, aired on stations nationwide, about bias being alleged against blind students by law schools.

Ellen Kreitzberg had a letter to the editor published in the LA Times and the Mercury News, about the budgetary cost of the death penalty.

Ron Katz had a letter to the editor printed in the New York Times regarding a lack of rules to prevent injuries at home plate in baseball.

Bradley Joondeph was quoted in a Politico story about how challenges to the Obama Administrations’ health-care law could get bogged down in procedural issues such as whether the challengers have legal standing to bring them. He was also quoted in CQHealthbeat about the lawyers for the two sides of the health-care litigation and in the San Francisco Chronicle about the likelihood of the suits being heard by the Supreme Court.

Deep Gulasekaram talked to KQED radio about a Supreme Court ruling that states can crack down on businesses that hire undocumented immigrants.

Stephen Diamond was quoted in a MarketWatch story about challenges facing Hewlett Packard’s new CEO.

Eric Goldman was quoted in Bloomberg Business Week about an FTC probe of Google. The story also ran in the Washington Post. KTVU also interviewed him on whether Facebook’s automatic facial recognition software is an invasion of privacy, and he was quoted in MediaPost about a search-engine lawsuit and in InformationWeek and other affiliated publications about a lawsuit against Google over the name Chrome.

Anna Han was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News and other papers about a settlement between Yahoo and a Chinese company 40 percent owned by Yahoo, which transferred a valuable asset without Yahoo’s knowledge.

Patricia Cain and Stephanie M. Wildman will both be presenting at a roundtable entitled Discovering, Developing, and Teaching Women’s Law Stories as part of the Law and Society meeting in San Francisco on June 5. This Roundtable will explore the process of discovering, researching, developing and teaching stories of women and law, both litigants and lawyers, and the significance of these stories for feminism, legal history and legal theory. The panelists will consider the explanatory power of individual stories for understanding the first and second waves of the women’s legal movement and for exploring the impact of gender discrimination as well as race, class, and sexual orientation on the experiences of women. More info…

Michelle Oberman was quoted in the Fort Collins Coloradoan about the tragedy of mothers who kill their own children.

Eric Goldman was quoted in a New York Times story about the difficulty of enforcing privacy laws of different countries on Internet companies like Twitter, and spoke to the New York Times and KGO TV about a challenge to Google over its acceptance of ads from rogue pharmacies. He also spoke to the San Jose Mercury News about a Facebook PR firm’s clandestine campaign to bash Google. All the stories were widely carried by other media outlets nationwide.

Anna Han was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News about a dispute between Yahoo and its Chinese company partner.

David Ball talked to KCBS and KLIV radio stations about a new Supreme Court decision ordering California to release thousands of prisoners due to inhumane conditions in the prisons.

Linda Starr was quoted in the legal newspaper Daily Journal about a new DA for Kern County who has drawn criticism for her aggressiveness, and in the Louis Farakkhan/Nation of Islam-founded paper The Final Call about the prevalence of wrongful convictions, especially against African-American men.

Al Hammond was quoted in a story about social entrepreneurship in the San Jose Mercury News.

Eric Goldman was quoted in the International Herald Tribune, New York Times and numerous Las Vegas sites and newspapers including the Las Vegas Sun about a key case regarding bloggers’ rights to reproduce articles written by news organizations.

Asian Journal wrote a profile of Angelo Ancheta who was recently appointed to the California Citizens Redistricting Commission.

Patricia Cain was quoted in Bankrate.com about the difficulties of married same-sex couples to figure out their tax-filing status, due to conflicts among various laws.

Sandee Magliozzi, Director, Professional Development and Externships, was elected a Director on the Board of Directors of the National Association for Law Placement (NALP) during their annual business meeting on April 29. Her extensive past service to NALP includes service as chair of the Law Student Professional Development Section; as a vice-chair of the Law Student Professional Development Section; as Liaison to the LGBT Bar Association; as a member of the Professional Development Institute Planning Committee; as an author of numerous past NALP Bulletin articles; and as a speaker at past NALP conferences.

Bradley Joondeph was a guest on the syndicated public radio Kojo Nnamdi Show to discuss the progress of legal challenges to Obama’s health-care law.

An Associated Press story exploring the cases of mothers killing their children quoted Michelle Oberman and ran in more than 240 publications or sites nationwide, including theAtlanta Journal-Constitution, Chicago Tribune, the website of the Today Show, and the Kansas City Star.

Eric Goldman was quoted in the New York Times about a ruling against Google in Europe and in the LA Times about the failed effort by twobrothers to further sue Mark Zuckerberg. His new site highlighting an abusive practice by some doctors, DoctoredReviews.com, was written up in Bloomberg News, MediaPost, and the blogs TechDirt and Justia.

David Friedman was quoted in the Boston Globe and Jewish World Review about widespread misperceptions of the economic success of President Herbert Hoover.

Santa Clara Law’s High Tech Law Institute and UC Berkeley Law School’s Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic have created a new website, doctoredreviews.com, to expose the legal and ethical risks of restricting a patient’s right to free speech.

Patricia Cain was quoted extensively in the New York Times blog, Bucks, about the strange tax situation that married gay couples find themselves in because of a lack of recognition of same-sex marriage by federal tax officials.

Ellen Kreitzberg was interviewed on KQED’s Forum about the start of the trial for the alleged murderer of journalist Chauncey Bailey.

Stephen Diamond was quoted in the New York Times about Facebook’s firing of an employee for stock-trading violations.

Eric Goldman was quoted in an Associated Press article about Google’s acquisition of airline fare tracker ITA Software, which ran in about 95 outlets. He also was in the Financial Times, two Wall Street Journal blogs, NPR’s Marketplace, the Mercury News and San Jose/Silicon Valley Business Journal discussing various timely tech-law cases.

David Hasen was quoted over three days for a special report on KLIV radio about the push for breaks on taxes for companies that “repatriate” earnings being held in overseas affiliates.

Dean Donald Polden was noted in ABA Journal, Inside Higher Ed and Tax Prof for his reaction to criticisms of an ABA committee’s proposals to revamp law-school accreditation standards.

Colleen Chien wrote a piece for Patently O, regarding the FTC and patents and notices.

David Friedman wrote an article for The Progress Report on Progress.com, arguing that markets are “highly but not completely efficient.”

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in a Monterey County Herald story about a stalking defendant’s victim being advised by his lawyer.

Cookie Ridolfi was recognized in the March 2011 issue of California Lawyer as one of the 45 recipients of the Clay Award – given to those “whose outstanding work had a significant impact in 2010.” Read more…

Paige Kaneb, Supervising Attorney with the Northern California Innocence Project, wrote an opinion piece for the San Francisco Chronicle titled “DA Should Admit Convicting an Innocent Man” about the case of recent exoneree Maurice Antwone Caldwell.

Northern California Innocence Project’s Veritas Initiative was reported on by CNN.

The San Jose Mercury News ran an article detailing how prosecutor David Angel is teaching a wrongful conviction class alongside Cookie Ridolfi, the director of the Northern California Innocence Project.

Lecturer Gordon Yamate wrote an oped for the San Jose Mercury News about how a judge’s decision in a shareholder lawsuit involving Del Monte Foods sheds light on investment bankers’ conflicts of interest.

Scott Maurer (KGACLC) appeared in an ABC “7 on Your Side” story that provided tips for indebted people to stop harassing calls and tactics by collection agencies.

David Sloss wrote an oped for the legal paper San Francisco/Los Angeles Daily Journal about a lack of knowledge about international law by those prosecuting piracy.

Catherine Sandoval was selected a “2011 Woman of Influence” by the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal (along with 5 Santa Clara Law alumna).

Eric Goldman was interviewed by the San Francisco Chronicle on search bias, which has emerged as a central issue in Google antitrust inquiries. Read more… He also was in Politico.com talking about the New York Times’ new charges for online news.

News that the Northern California Innocence Project had achieved one prisoner’s exoneration and another’s verdict reversal (which later became an exoneration) made headlines across the country, including stories in the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, KTLA TV, Herald Sun, TMC.net, McClatchy Information Services, and the CBS blog CrimeSider. Some of the stories quoted Linda Starr.

Patricia Cain was quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle about the complexities for same-sex couples filing taxes.

Brad Joondeph’s comments about the Supreme Court’s plans to expedite hearings on the federal health law were carried in the blog California Healthline.

Brad Joondeph made the National Jurist’s list of “23 Law Professors To Take Before You Die” as best professor of Constitutional Law. Gerald Uelmen made the same list as best professor of Criminal Procedure. Read more…

Lynette Parker co-authored a Promising Practices Manual titled “Representing Survivors of Human Trafficking” which was just published by Immigrant Legal Resource Center in San Francisco. It is being marketed nationwide. Professor Parker was also invited to participate in a stakeholder meeting organized by Office of Victims of Crime (U.S. Department of Justice) and OVCTTAC. The meeting brought stakeholders from around the country together for a two-day intensive discussion on emerging issues for victims of crimes in the U.S.Professor Parker is being given an award by Community Solutions (Morgan Hill/Gilroy) as their “Helping Hand” award recipient on March 18.

Cookie Ridolfi and Maurice Possley co-authored an opinion piece in the San Jose Mercury News headlined “Opinion: Defendants exonerated, but off-base prosecutors pay no price”, about prosecutorial misconduct

A study on duopolies co-authored by Allen Hammond was cited in stories about Rupert Murdock, in the Columbia Journalism Review and the Washington Post.

Patricia Cain was interviewed by Tax Notes about the complexities of a new IRS rule allowing same-sex partners to claim refunds using state community property rules.

Brad Joondeph was quoted by Politico.com about the pace of lawsuits challenging the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and his blog was quoted in the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. ABC.com quoted him in a story about the oddities of having Washington state’s top legal enforcer fighting the Obama health law while the governor supports it.

A symposium organized by Eric Goldman about the 15-year anniversary of a key Internet law, was the subject of several days of social-media chatter on Twitter and blogs. Stories stemming from the conference were posted at AltAssets.net, Computerworld, Techdirt, and paidContent.org (which was picked up on various Yahoo! Sites). Also, Goldman was quoted in TechWeb, the San Francisco Chronicle, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, and Warren’s Washington Internet Daily about tech-law topics.

Tyler Ochoa was quoted in MediaPost.com about why TV streamer Ivi – which has been ordered to cease certain operations – does not meet the legal definition of a cable system.

Deep Gulasekaram was quoted in various newspapers and websites, including the Fresno Bee, Sacramento Bee, Hispanic Business, and NorthJersey.com, about California’s attorney general seeking to lift the stay on gay marriages while the matter is litigated.

Sandee Magliozzi spoke to the Recorder about how law firms can add value. The story was picked up in the Community Voices blog of the Pittsburgh Post Gazette.

The National Center for Policy Analysis ran a feature item about a paper co-authored by David Friedman suggesting that indigent defendants be able to pick their lawyer through a voucher system.

Patricia Cain talked to KLIV radio about the Obama Administration’s decision not to defend the Defense of Marriage Act.

Ed Steinman talked to NBC about the Obama Administration’s decision not to defend the Defense of Marriage Act.

Dean Donald Polden was featured in the Legal Intelligencer commenting on the complexities of adding diversity to the factors considered by law-school rankings. He was also in the Daily Record discussing dropping the LSAT from admissions requirements.

Stephen Diamond was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News article about the coming wave of IPOs. He also had a letter in the UK Guardian arguing that recent events in Egypt and Tunisia are not similar to Polish Solidarity.

Eric Goldman was in the Wall Street Journal discussing an antitrust inquiry into Apple’s distribution methods. The story and Goldman’s quotes were noted in the New York Times. Goldman also talked to the Wall Street Journal about the Prince of Monaco suing a blogger, and to Information Week about the rise of lawsuits concerning improper sharing of “unique identifiers” in phones. He was also cited in Law.com, the U.K. Register, and appeared on ABC7.

A San Jose Mercury News story quoting Anna Han about a high-level trip to a China factoring beset by employee suicides was picked up by 30 other papers or sites including the Vancouver Sun, and the Knoxville News Sentinel.

EDN.com wrote about a paper by Colleen Chien describing changing attitudes toward “patent trolls,” or companies that buy or use patents largely to make money.

Cookie Ridolfi is one of 45 attorneys named by California Lawyer Magazine in their 15th annual California Lawyer Attorneys of the Year Awards. Award winners’ achievements had a significant impact in 2010, or their work is expected to have such an effect in the coming years. Professor Ridolfi was awarded for her investigation of more than 700 cases of prosecutorial misconduct in California and subsequent publication of her findings in a landmark report last fall for the Northern California Innocence Project. After revelations that only six prosecutors were ever disciplined, the State Bar of Californiahas pledged to reexamine all allegations made in the report and increase efforts to educate prosecutors about its discipline process.

Art Gemmell, International Law Scholar in our Center for Global Law and Policy, and Autumn Talbott, a 2010 Santa Clara Law graduate, co-authored an article entitled “The Lex Mercatoria-Redux”that will be published in the upcoming edition of the Transnational Dispute Management Journal.

Congratulations to Angelo Ancheta who has been named to the 14-member Citizens Redistricting Commission, the voter-created body that is re-drawing legislative, congressional and other voting districts in California by Aug. 15. More…

Congratulations to Cathy Sandoval, who has been appointed by Governor Jerry Brown to serve on the California Public Utility Commission. The PUCregulates telecommunications, energy, water, and some transportation services under state jurisdiction. This story made headlines nationwide, including stories in Capitol Weekly, San Francisco Chronicle, Los Angeles Daily Times, Bellingham Herald, and the San Jose Mercury News and numerous MediaNews, Dow Jones and AP stories. More…

Stephen Diamond was quoted in MarketWatch, the San Jose Mercury News and more than a dozen affiliate papers discussing HP’s controversial choices for new board members.

Brad Joondeph was quoted on ABCnews.com about legal challenges to the Obama administration’s health care reform law, stating that ultimately the constitutionality of the law will be decided by the Supreme Court.

Brad Joondeph was quoted in the New York Times about the pro-business focus of the Roberts Supreme Court and spoke to the Wall Street Journal, New York Post and National Public Radio station 89.2 KPCC about a legal setback to the Obama health-care law.

Eric Goldman was quoted in ABA Journal about an Apple anti-sexting technology.

Pat Cain’s Same Sex Tax Law blog was cited in a New York Times article about a new IRS decision that affects same-sex partners in the three states with both community-propertylaws and same-sex marriage or registered domestic partnerships: California,Nevada and Washington.

Anna Han was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News, ABCNews.com and the Contra Costa Times talking about some of the problems in the background during the visit of China’s President Hu Jintao. The story ran in numerous other publications.

Dean Donald Polden wasquoted by the National Law Journal, American Lawyer, Texas Lawyer,  U.S. News & World Report’s Morse Code blog, Inside Higher Ed, Environmental Law Professors and others about ABA’s discussions about whether the LSAT should be mandatory for law-school admission.

A new website dedicated to explaining the Catholic Church’s views on the death penalty, created by Gerald Uelmen was highlighted in Catholic Voice of Oakland and the website of the California Province of Jesuits. Uelmen was also quoted in the San Jose Mercury News, San Francisco Chronicle and in a widely reprinted AP story about the retirement of Calif. Supreme Court justice Carlos Moreno.

Stephen Diamond was quoted in a widely reprinted San Jose Mercury News story about the potential investment frenzy that might ensue from a Facebook IPO.

Ed Steinman was interviewed on KCBS radio about the decision by the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit to ask the California Supreme Court to decide whether the ballot measure’s sponsors can defend the proposition in a federal court. He also spoke to KGO radio about the proposed Arizona legislation to prevent children of undocumented immigrants to be citizens and about a legal setback to the Obama health care law.

Two faculty members had their comments cited in the Federal Communications Commission’s Net Neutrality order released on 12/23/2010. Al Hammond‘s comments filed on behalf of the Broadband Institute of California in conjunction with the Broadband Clinic course Al taught last fall, and Catherine Sandoval‘s comments, as well as her Fordham Law Review article, “Disclosure, Deception, and Deep-Packet Inspection” were cited several times. The order is lengthy and can be accessed from the FCC web site at: Fcc.gov. Once at FCC.gov, go to headlines, look for the orders released on Dec. 23, 2010, click on R&O for the Report and Order.

Gerald Uelmen moderated the Ingram Symposium, a discussion between Hon. Tani Cantil-Sakauye, the new Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court and Hon. Alex Kozinski, Chief Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. The topic was maintaining collegiality in a contentious climate, and the participants touched on the recent shootings in Tucson of a congresswoman and federal judge. Watch a clip from KTVU news. The Daily Journal also ran on article on the Ingram Symposium.

Dean Donald Polden chairs the Standards Review Committee of the American Bar Association’s Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar. Comments he made to the Association of American Law Schools on the topics of tenure and ABA accreditation standards were the subject of stories in the San Francisco Chronicle, the ABA Journal, the Chronicle of Higher Education and the National Law Journal.

The Northern California Innocence Project unearthed new evidence in the case of client Maurice Caldwell which led to his exoneration. Read more…

Kevin P. Quinn, S.J., executive director of the Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education and professor of law, has been named the 25th president of The University of Scranton.Father Quinn will assume his duties as president on July 1, 2011. Since 2007, Father Quinn has taught in the School of Law where he offers a seminar on Bioethics and the Law. Father Quinn has also served as the executive director of the Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education since 2006. As executive director, he has been instrumental indeepening the understanding of Jesuit education. Read more…

Eric Goldman was quoted in a Forbes Magazine article on Wikileaks and Julian Assange.

Margaret M. Russell wrote on op-ed for the Daily Journal which is a “roundup” of federal marriage equality federal cases in 2010.

David Ball was interviewed on CBS5 about a Supreme Court case addressing California’s dysfunctional prison system.


Faculty News – 2010

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in The New York Times about legal problems that could derail the possibility of Dianne Feinstein’s daughter, a judge, being considered for San Francisco District Attorney. He was also quoted in a widely reprinted Los Angeles Times story about problems with death-row legal representation.

Eric Goldman was quoted in more than a dozen sites such as PC World about Google being found guilty of trespassing on a Pennsylvania family’s property for its Google Maps website. He was also quoted in a widely carried Canadian news story about Wikileaks and the Chronicle of Higher Education about new study-aid websites.

Northern California Innocence Project study on prosecutorial misconduct was featured on Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN.

David Friedman co-wrote an oped for the Atlanta Journal Constitution on free-market solutions to the current abysmal system for indigent defense. The oped was related to a research paper he co-wrote for the Cato Institute on the same topic.

Ed Steinman was interviewed by KCBS radio about the U.S. Supreme Court hearing of a challenge to federal courts in California taking over the administration of California state prisons in areas like prisoner health and safety. He also was interviewed by KGO radio about the Ninth Circuit argument on the constitutionality of Prop. 8, the California voter-approved prohibition of gay marriage.

Deep Gulasekaram was interviewed on KCBS radio about Congress’s attempts to repeal the federal military Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell law, and a related Pentagon study.

Brad Joondeph was quoted in the Wall Street Journal and on NPR in Los Angeles about the ruling by a Virginia judge on whether the Obama administration’s health law violates the Constitution.

Eric Goldman’s comments on Oracle’s $1.3 million verdict against SAP were quoted in nearly 200 publications across the world, after he spoke to a variety of media outlets including Associated Press, Reuters, and the Wall Street Journal. He was also quoted in numerous other publications including the New York Times and NPR’s Marketplace about various tech-law topics including Amazon’s removal of a book for pedophiles.

Beth Van Schaack wrote an article assessing the applicability of International Humanitarian Law to maritime piracy, in the Opino Juris blog.

The Equal Justice Society, a national civil rights non-profit organization based inSan Francisco, will honor Professors Margalynne J. Armstrong, Margaret M. Russell, and Stephanie M. Wildman at their tenth anniversary gala on Tuesday, December 7 atYoshi’s in San Francisco.Professors Armstrong, Russell, and Wildman are among thefounders of EJS.Professor Russell served as on the board of directors from 2000-2009,and will also be honored as a founding board member.For information about tickets and the work of the Equal Justice Society, visit www.equaljusticesociety.org.

For the second year in a row, Eric Goldman‘s Technology and Marketing Law Blog was selected as one of the ABA Journal’s Blawg 100. List of blogs is here. Eric Goldman’s blog is here.

Beth Van Schaack was invited to join the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on Public International Law. Other members are all prior Legal Advisors to the State Department plus some renowned public international law professors, including Michael Reisman (Yale), Steve Ratner (Michigan), Jose Alvarez (NYU), Lori Damrosch (Columbia), Oona Hathaway (Yale), Gerald Neuman (Harvard), Sean Murphy (George Washington), Jenny Martinez (Stanford), Curt Bradley (Duke), & Ed Swaine (George Washington).

Eric Goldman was quoted in stories that ran in hundreds of publications such as the Wall Street JournalSacramento Bee, SmartMoney and eWeek. He discussed numerous lawsuits and legal topics including a Google lawsuit against the U.S. government and the Oracle v. SAP case and its implications for Oracle’s relationship with HP.

Deep Gulasekaram was quoted in an ABC7 story about the Supreme Court’s hearing on whether states can limit sales of violent video games to minors. The story was picked up by more than a dozen other stations nationwide including some in Norfolk, Va.; Flint, Mich; Pensacola, Fla.; Reno, and New Orleans.

Tyler Ochoa was quoted in a CNET story about another legal loss for a mother accused of illegally sharing music.

Beth Van Schaackwas quoted in Ethical Corporation Online about a federal appeals court decision that set back the ability of human-rights activists to sue U.S. companies.

David Ball wrote an oped for the Daily Journal about how politicians and others need to recognize that, just as with car safety, there will always be risks to public safety.

Stephen Diamond was quoted in two MarketWatch stories about troubles behind the start of HP’s new CEO Leo Apotheker.

Margaret Russell has has edited an anthology on the constitutional freedoms of assembly and petition. THE FIRST AMENDMENT: FREEDOM OF ASSEMBLY AND PETITION has been published by Prometheus Books. More info…

Patricia Cain is heading an ABA Section of Taxation Teaching Tax Committee group to examine community property issues related to registered domestic partnerships and submit comments to the IRS on the topic. She gave a lecture at Golden Gate University entitled “Taxation of Registered Domestic Partnerships Community Property: The Recent IRS Shift & The Unanswered Questions”. Professor Cain also presented on several panels: at the ABA Annual Meeting in San Francisco in August 2010 and at the annual conference of the National LGBT Bar Association in Miami in August 2010. She also gave presentations on tax and estate law for same sex couples at Sand Hill Advisors in San Francisco and for the California State Bar’s Estate and Gift Tax Conference.

LARAW Director Evangeline Abriel presented oral argument in Lopez-Cardona v. Holder before the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.In September she was a panelist at the Immigration Reform Forum presented by the Asian Pacific Islander American Public Affairs Association (APAPA) in Saratoga, California.In October she presented a nation-wide webinar on Immigration Relief for Victims of Human Trafficking on behalf of the U.S. Catholic Conference’s Migration and Refugee Services. In December Abrilpresented a two-day training, along with Lynette Parker of the Katherine and George Alexander Law Center, on removal proceedings and on immigration law and crimes in Saipan, Commonwealth of the Horthern Mariana Islands.

Michael Flynn was recently invited to serve as a justice for the final round of the regional Thomas Tang Moot Court Competition, hosted by the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association. (www.napaba.org/napaba/) The final round will be held in the en banc courtroom of the Ninth Circuit.

Stephanie Wildman co-edited the anthology WOMEN AND THE LAW STORIES. Wildman also contributed a chapter to the volume and co-authored the introduction. Read more…

Responding to Northern California Innocence Project‘s recent report on prosecutorial misconduct, the California State Bar Association is reviewing the records of 130 prosecutors named in the report for possible disciplinary action. Link to Mercury News Article. Here is an article from the Cal Bar Journal.

Eric Goldman was quoted in the (UK) Register about Wikileaks’ Pentagon papers and whether Amazon has any legal exposure for hosting a version of the papers. He was also quoted in other publications including the Wall Street Journal, ABA Law Journal, MediaPost, Sacramento Bee and Miami Herald about various tech-law issues including the use of Craigslist for criminal activity and “data scraping” companies.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in numerous sites and publications, including the Huffington Post and the Media Awareness Project, about Prop. 19, the marijuana-legalization measure.

Gerald Uelmen published an opinion piece in the Sacramento Bee about costs associated with death penalty cases in California. From the article: “…The biggest reason for the delay in California is that the demand for competent, experienced death penalty lawyersvastly exceeds the available supply. The size of the available supplyis directly related to the economics of practicing law in a state like California. More than 40 percent of the 713 inmates on California’s death row are still waiting for the appointment of a lawyer to handle the habeascorpus reviews to which they are constitutionally entitled.”

Gerald Uelmen spoke to the San Jose Mercury News about concerns for the future of the state’s judiciary should Meg Whitman be elected governor, for a story run in numerous affiliated papers. He also spoke to the San Francisco Chronicle about former California Jerry Brown’s statements about the late, liberal Supreme Court justice Rose Bird and to the Sacramento Bee and Wall Street Journal about the marijuana-legalization measure Prop. 19.

Ed Steinman spoke to the San Jose Mercury News about legal maneuvers in the Los Gatos murder-for-hire trial. The story ran in several local papers.

Ed Steinman was quoted in a widely reprinted Contra Costa Times story about the trial underway for abusers of a teenage boy who escaped prolonged captivity.

Kyle Grahamspoke to ABC about a case in which a man with Egyptian and Muslim heritage was tracked via GPS by the FBI.

The Northern California Innocence Project released a groundbreaking report about hundreds of cases of prosecutorial misconduct in California over the last decade. The report found that punishment was meted out in about 1% of some 600 cases it tracked where prosecutorial misconduct was established. The study was authored by Cookie Ridolfi and Maurice Possley, and made headlines in more than a dozen papers, websites, TV news and blogs including articles in the Wall Street Journal, KGO ABC TV 7, the Los Angeles Times, and the ABA Journal.

Ellen Kreitzberg was quoted on the legal issues behind California’s first lethal injection case in nearly five years. Professor Krietzberg spoke to NBC Bay Area, CBS TV, KCBS radio and KLIV radio as well as the San Francisco Chronicle and the Associated Press about the ever-changing story. The AP story ran in more than 65 publications.

Deep Gulasekaram discussed “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” on the CBS 5 morning show.

Ellen Kreitzberg was awarded the “2010 Friend of the Public Defender” award “in recognition of the generous support of the indigent accused and the constitutional right to counsel” at a dinner celebrating the 45th anniversary of the Santa Clara County Public Defender’s office.

Eric Goldman spoke to KRON4 about the Rutgers tragedy, and was widely noted forhaving spurred online document sharing company Scribd to improve privacy protections by changing to an opt-in model. He also appeared in numerous Florida papersdiscussing a crime stemming from a Craigslist ad. He was quoted in MediaPost, ZDNet, and elsewhere on a variety of high-tech law cases including the admission into evidence of a defendant’s deleted Facebook postings.

Al Hammond and Michelle Oberman were honored by Santa Clara University at the President’s Faculty Recognition Reception on September 14. Professor Hammond received a President’s Special Recognition Award which goes to someone who has made a significant contribution to advancing student and faculty persity and inclusive excellence. Professor Oberman received the Award for Recent Achievement in Scholarship which recognizes a tenured faculty member or senior lecturer whose scholarly or creative work over the previous five years represents a major contribution to a field of knowledge or to the arts. Read more…

Dean Donald Polden was quoted by USA Today about ways in which law schools can improve reporting of their job-placement statistics.

Angelo Ancheta, director of the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center, has received a one-year renewal award of $21,334 from the State Bar of California Legal Services Trust Fund Program.The funds will be used to provide legal assistance to immigrant victims of domestic violence.

Eric Goldman was quoted in a widely reprinted L.A. Times story about how bloggers face significant liability for critical posts. That story, and Goldman’s quotes, were picked up by bloggers for the ABA Journal and Wall Street Journal, as well as sites like FoxNews.com. He also spoke to various media, including Chicago Tribune and The New York Times, about other tech-law topics.

Deep Gulasekaram was interviewed on NBC Bay Area news talking about the Prop. 8 ruling.

Al Hammond was quoted in articles in the New York Times and San Jose Mercury News about net neutrality and the recently announced proposal between Google and Verizon toprevent high-speed Internet access providers from prioritizing different kinds of traffic.

Stephen Diamond was quoted in two Associated Press Financial Wire articles about the recent ouster of Hewlett-Packard CEO Mark Hurd. The articles ran in the San Jose Mercury News, the Contra Costa Times, and more than 200 other papers and websites across the country.

Margalynne Armstrong was quoted in a San Francisco Chronicle article about the ruling against Proposition 8 inU.S. District Court.

Margaret Russell was quoted extensively in the media about the ruling by U.S. District Court that Proposition 8, California’s same sex marriage ban, is unconstitutional. Professor Russell was quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle, Thomson Financial News (Reuters) the New York Times, did a radio interview with KGO-7, and a t.v. interview with KPIX, which can be watched here.

Deep Gulasekaram was asked by the American Constitutional Society (ACS) to enter a Guest Blogger entry about the Arizona Law and the recent ruling by the federal district court. Read the blog post here.

David Ball’s article “Civil, Criminal, or Mary Jane: Stigma, Legislative Labels, and the Civil Case at the Heart of Criminal Procedure”, was recently listed on SSRN’s Top Ten download list for Corrections & Sentencing Law & Policy eJournal, Criminology eJournal, and eight other topics.

Tom Klein authored a chapter in the leading securities law treatise entitled Securities Law Techniques, a 7-volume treatise published by LexisNexis.

The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board (FSB), Bureau of Education and Cultural Affair of the Department of State (ECA), and the Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES) has approved Dr. Art Gemmell for candidacy on the Fulbright Senior Specialists Roster. Gemmell is a Law Lecturer &International Law Scholar at Santa Clara Law’s Center for Global Law and Policy.

Angelo Ancheta has received a one-year renewal award of $31,519 from the County of Santa Clara.The funds will be used to provide legal assistance to immigrant victims of domestic violence.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in articles in the Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Chronicle about Governor Schwarzenegger’s nomination of 3rd District Court of Appeal Justice Tani Gorre Cantil-Sakauye to replace retiring California Chief Justice Ronald George.

Allen Hammond was quoted in an article in the Los Angeles Times about net neutrality rules that are expected to be issued by the FederalCommunications Commission, and which are seen as a boon to Google by limiting theability of high-speed Internet service providers, such as phone andcable companies, to steer users to their own content.

Bradley Joondeph has started the ACA Litigation Blog with Eric Lightman. The blog is “A place to find news updates, legal analysis, and all officialdocuments related to the states’ constitutional challenges to thePatient Protection and Affordable Care Act (as amended by the HealthCare and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010)”. Read more.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Chronicle and the San Jose Mercury News discussing the upcoming retirement of California Chief Justice Ronald George.

Stephen Diamond was interviewed by KGO-7 (ABC Bay Area news) regarding the accusation by a Chinese-funded academic group that Facebook and other social networking sites are allowing users to stir up unrest in China. Watch the clip here.

Ed Steinman was interviewedin two segments on KPIX/CBS 5 TV about the verdict of involuntary manslaughter reached in the case of Johannes Mehserle, the BART officer who killed Oscar Grant during a routine arrest.Watch the clip here. Professor Steinman was also quoted in an Associated Press story on the case which ran in nearly four dozen papers or websites across the country, and by theSan Francisco Chronicle, the Oakland Tribune, the San Jose Mercury News and the Contra Costa Times.

Patricia Cain was interviewed by the San Francisco Chronicle and on KGO TV about the tax implications of certain benefits provided to same-sex partners of employees, as part of a story on Google’s payment to gay and lesbian employees to offset the tax costs of benefits that are tax-free to heterosexual couples.

Dorothy Glancy was a chair at the Conference on Computers, Freedom and Privacy, a group of privacy advocates, computer scientists, lawyers and others. The conference drew up what they hope will be a milestone for the social Web: a “bill of rights” for social-network users. The 14 principles were ultimately adopted unanimously, and organizers said they hoped the document, by encompassing ideas that have been talked about for years by tech pundits and privacy advocates, would prove to be historic. Professor Glancy was also quoted in a San Jose Mercury News article aobut the conference. The story ran in the Los Angeles Daily News and TMCnet.com as well.

Bradley Joondeph spoke with USA Today about the Elena Kagan Supreme Court confirmation hearings. Professor Joondeph also discussed the nomination hearings with radio station WHYY and Minnesota Public Radio, and talked to KLIV radio about the Supreme Court’s decision in support of the constitutionality of the Public Company Accounting and Oversight Board.

Eric Goldman was quoted in an Associated Press story about a judge’s dismissal of a lawsuit against Google by Viacom over copyright infringement on YouTube – a story that was picked up in 129 online or print publications, including the Boston Globe, Forbes, Salon.com, The New York Times, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, and San Diego Tribune. He also was quoted in a San Jose Mercury News story regarding privacy concerns about “smart” gadgets that require extensive personal information. The story ran in well over a dozen other publications. His comments to Reuters about Google’s cumulative legal problems appeared in about 20 sites or publications, including Saudi Gazette, Financial Express Bangladesh, and Reuters India. He also was quoted by MediaPost, ABC radio Australia, CNET, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, WSJ’s Digits and Bits blogs, and IDG publications about assorted cyberlaw issues.

David Friedman was interviewed in Region Focus, the magazine of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.

Work by the Northern California Innocence Project/a> to get a new trial for an accused arsonist was featured a Los Angeles Times story that ran in more than a dozen papers including the Sacramento Bee and the Modesto Bee, where a columnist also discussed the case.

Santa Clara University has recognized distinguished members of the faculty with appointments to endowed chairs. Kenneth Manaster was appointed as the Presidential Professor of Ethics and the Common Good. Based on the recommendations by the deans and Provost, endowed professorships are given to faculty who are prominent intellectual leaders with the talent and vision to invigorate their departments and centers of distinction, inspire other faculty, and raise the national profile of the University.

Allen Hammond testified at a hearing on the Proposed Combination of Comcast and NBC-Universal, which was held by the House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary.

Gerald Uelmen wrote a feature for the June 2010 issue of California Lawyer entitled “The Wit, Wisdom, and Worthlessness of Law Reviews”. Read the article here.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in a Los Angeles Times article about legislation approved by the California State Senate that would vastly expand the powers of  Los Angeles City Attorney Carmen Trutanich by giving him his own grand jury. Uelmen said he was not aware of any other city attorney in the nation with the power to empanel a grand jury for misdemeanor cases. Trutanich’s proposal “seems like a rather elaborate solution to a simple problem,” said Uelmen.

Eric Goldman was quoted in a San Francisco Chronicle article about the privacy consequences of sharing personal information on social networking sites. Contributors must learn how the data can be used and exercise more caution when sharing it, and consumers must become more savvy about the credibility of sources and the actual relevance of information. “It can’t be a disqualification because then everyone gets disqualified,” Goldman said. “We’re not going to be able to put the genie back in the bottle, so we’re going to have to become smarter consumers of information.”

Dorothy Glancy will co-chair the 20th annual CFP conference at San Jose State University from June 15-18. This year’s program will feature keynote speakers Peter Cullen of Microsoft on Tuesday, David Drummond of Google on Thursday, and California Secretary of State Debra Bowen on Friday. Read more…

Colleen Chien will be participating in a roundtable hosted by the Federal Trade Commission, Department of Justice, and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, on May 26, 2010, at the Office’s headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia. The workshop will address the interaction between patent policy and competition policy as part of ongoing joint work by the agencies in this area. Read the FTC press announcement.

Jerry Uelmen was quoted twice in May in the San Francisco Chronicle, once discussing lawsuits due to state budget cuts and once discussing many prosecutors reluctance to draw up disclosure policies and lists of police officers with records of convictions or lying.

Ed Steinman was quoted by the Contra Costa Times commenting about the media gag order in the case of Melissa Huckaby, who pled guilty to the murder of 8 year old Sandra Cantu in Tracy, CA. Steinman commented that he hadn’t heard of a gag order continuing after a guilty finding, saying that the gag order is aimed at the public so they don’t develop prejudice before a trial.

Linda Starr was interviewed on KCBS radio regarding the recent US Supreme court decision that held it unconstitutional to sentence juveniles to life without the possibility of parole for crimes other than homicide.

Kyle Graham spoke to WJRT-TV online about a settlement in which Walmart has agreed to pay $27.6 million to settle allegations that it dumped hazardous waste at stores across California, a case that led to changes in the retailer’s practices nationwide.

Tyler Ochoa‘s essay From Moveable Type to Messaging: Copyright Law at 300 was published in the Los Angeles Daily Journal and the San Francisco Daily Journal on April 27. The essay was previously published in Eric Goldman’s Technology and Marketing Law Blog on April 10, the 300th Anniversary of the Statute of Anne, the first modern copyright law. On April 29, Tyler Ochoa spoke on “The Litigation Year in Review” and “Termination Rights: Three Years Later” at The Copyright Office Comes to Music City, a conference co-sponsored by the U.S. Copyright Office and the First Amendment Center in Nashville, Tennessee.

Stephen Diamond co-authored an oped advocating the abolishment of SEC rule 144A, which allows companies to sell massive amounts of securities – including many behind the financial meltdown – through “private placements” that avoid disclosure, liability, and other SEC rules. The oped ran in Newdeal2.0 and the Huffington Post. He was also on KLIV radio on May 6, discussing that day’s 1,000-point swing in the Dow.

Margaret Russell was a featured guest on KQED’s Forum, discussing President Obama’s choice of current Solicitor General Elena Kagan to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens.

Eric Goldman was quoted in a FoxNews.com story about a federal obscenity law, as part of a story on Wikipedia’s co-founder trying to purge porn from the site. The UK-based Register and the niche publication Adult Video News ran excerpts from the Fox story. Goldman also talked to TechWeb about the illegal practice of “data scraping” – using programs to siphon all the data from a company’s database. He was also featured in a podcast on LegalTalk Network about the theft of a prototype iPhone 4G from a local bar, and talked to KCBS radio about the iPhone issue.

The ACLU of Santa Clara Valley honored Cookie Ridolfi and Linda Starr of NCIP in the annual Don Edwards Award Celebration on June 12. Read more…

Eric Goldman discussed numerous tech-law issues with reporters including the FTC’s view of bloggers receiving gifts (Law.com); Facebook’s partial victory in a click-fraud case (MediaPost); and a novel suit against Google over automatic search suggestions that pop up and suggest something undesirable about the person being searched. (TechWeb; InformationWeek; NBC.com).

The Northern California Innocence Project’s review of a Vacaville killing made the news in a number of papers, including InsideBayArea.com, the (Long Beach) Press-Telegram and (Vacaville) Reporter. Read more…

On May 13, 2010 Women Defenders honored Cookie Ridolfi for her contribution to the world of criminal defense. Go to www.womendefenders.org for more information.

Beth Van Schaack has updated the casebook she cowrote with Ronald C. Slye of Seattle Law, “International Criminal Law and Its Enforcement, Cases and Materials, Second Edition“.

Ed Steinman was interviewed by KCBS-AM radio about the decision by a San Francisco federal judge that found the federal government illegally wiretapped an Islamic charity and two attorneys without a search warrant. The decision is the first time that any court in this country has ruled that the post-Sept. 11 warrantless interception of communications between Americans and suspected foreign terrorists by the Bush administration violated the US Constitution.

Kenneth Manaster was quoted in the ABA Journal’s story about the retirement of Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, with whom Manaster worked on a Chicago judicial-corruption case in 1969.

Stephen Diamond was quoted extensively in an article on growing unrest among Chinese clothing sweatshop workers for insidefashionlive.com

Catherine Sandoval spoke to the San Jose Mercury News about a Court of Appeals ruling in April that rejected the argument of the FCC that it had the power to regulate Internet service providers. The decision deals a direct blow to proponents of so-called net neutrality rules, which require Internet service providers like Comcast to treat all Internet traffic equally. Sandoval is a former FCC official.

At the annual Conference of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis in March, Alan W. Scheflin received the prestigious Richard von Krafft-Ebbing Award for the Best Paper on Forensic Issues and Hypnosis. Read more…

Sandee Magliozzi talked to the San Francisco Business Times about changes to SCU Law services and classes to help prepare grads to stand out in the legal marketplace. The story ran in several area Business Journals.

Eric Goldman talked to ABC Australia Radio about Google and China. His name also appeared in print hundreds of times — stemming from interviews with the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Associated Press, Reuters and others— about topics like Google’s legal battle with Viacom; financial news aggregators; and a key Google Adwords victory. Several legal bloggers also extensively quoted him or his blog postings on Google, with praise like “excellent analysis.”

Angelo Ancheta spoke to Miller-McCune-Online about affirmative action, saying that schools should look at both class and race in order to increase diversity.

Anna Han was interviewed on ABC7 about the unlikely chances that China will stop censoring Internet access now that Google has pulled its search from China —a story that was picked up by numerous affiliate stations. She was also a source for the San Jose Mercury News on the same subject, a story picked up by nearly a dozen publications.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in an article in the Sacramento Bee about a case against a medical marijuana user who is on trial for concealing five pounds of medical marijuana in his luggage during a flight.

Colleen Chien was quoted in Business Week talking about the International Trade Commission becoming a new forum for patent disputes that are delayed or lost in federal court.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in a San Francisco Recorder article on California Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald George.

David Friedman wrote an item for Investors Business Daily about the fallacy of government contraction during the Great Depression. The article also ran in the Washington Times.

Michelle Oberman was quoted in an article in The Journal News (Westchester, NY) about a murder in which a mother strangled her adult daughter.

Anna Han gave a talk for the Business and Litigation sections of the SC County Bar Association on International Contracting Issues.

Eric Goldman was quoted in The Salt Lake Tribune discussing proposed state legislation that would allow companies that are victims of certain fraudulent practices to go after those responsible in state court. Goldman also spoke with ABC local news in the Bay Area about internet freedom becoming component of an on-going economic and diplomatic dispute impacting U.S.-China relations.

Michelle Oberman was quoted in the Vancouver Sun discussing the murder of children by their own mothers.

Pratheepan Gulasekaram was a featured guest on KALW’s CityVisions, talking about the legal aspects of the Prop. 8 trial, challenging the validity of California’s voter-approved anti-gay-marriage law.

Gerald Uelmen was quoted in the San Jose Mercury News discussing the boycott of Superior Court Judge Andrea Bryan initiated by Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr.

Gerald Uelmen argued a case on medical marijuana in the California Supreme Court and won a unanimous ruling. The Court ruled to invalidate state limits on medical marijuana possession, throwing out a 2003 provision that capped possession at eight ounces and cultivation at six mature or 12 immature plants. The decision means that people who have a doctor’s recommendation to use marijuana can possess and cultivate as much as is “reasonably necessary”.

Rachel Smith has a series of legal writing podcasts available online.

In January, a new casebook co-authored by Tyler Ochoa was published by Carolina Academic Press. The casebook is entitled Celebrity Rights: Rights of Publicity and Related Rights in the United States and Abroad. It is the first law-school casebook to comprehensively cover the law of rights of publicity, from both a domestic and a comparative law perspective. In February, Prof. Ochoa spoke on “The Litigation Year in Review” at “The Copyright Office Comes to California, a program co-sponsored by the U.S. Copyright Office and the State Bar of California Intellectual Property Section.

Kandis Scott‘s Why Did China Reform Its Death Penalty?, has now been published in University of Washington Law School’s speciality journal at 19 Pac. Rim L. & Pol. J. 63(2010).

Oxford University Press asked Kandis Scott for the shortest possible published piece of writing: a back cover blurb for Brest & Krieger, Problem Solving, Decision Making, and Professional Judgment.

Yvonne Ekern and Joanne Banker-Hames authored the fourth edition of their Introduction to Law text, which was recently translated into Chinese.

Cynthia Mertens was named one of the 2010 Women of Influence by the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal. The Business Journal will showcase the Women of Influence in a special publication, scheduled to run March 19.

Tom Klein published a book: Director and Officer Indemnification and Insurance for VC-Backed Companies, 2d Edition.

Stephen Diamond published a new book: From ‘Che’ to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy.

Cookie Ridolfi and Maurice Possley wrote a guest column in the January 29, 2010 issue of the Los Angeles Daily Journal, “Boycott Threatens Independent Judiciary”, which discusses the decision by Santa Clara County District Attorney Dolores Carr to stop bringing criminal cases before Superior Court Judge Andrea Bryan. Carr said she was upset over a number of rulings by the judge. Ridolfi and Possley state that on January 6, Judge Bryan decided to …”release Augustin Uribe, who was serving a sentence of 38 years to life on child molestation charges. Judge Bryan found that Carr’s Deputy District Attorney Troy Benson had testified falsely and committed “numerous acts of misconduct.” Uribe was convicted of sexually assaulting a young relative, but the conviction was set aside by the California appellate court, which held that the district attorney’s office had improperly withheld a videotape of the alleged victim’s physical exam. That tape was not turned over until after Uribe was convicted. Subsequently, an expert hired by Uribe’s defense team examined the tape and declared that it contradicted assertions by the prosecution witnesses that the child had been assaulted.”

Allen Hammond was part of a panel comprised of academics testifying at an FCC investigation of ownership diversity believe that there are ways the Commission can craft rules to increase minority and female ownership that would stand up to court scrutiny. Hammond stated that in most business types, minority ownership is close to their proportion of the population; but broadcast is a glaring exception. FCC must be able to show that broadcast diversity is a compelling government interest.

David Yosifon published on op-ed on the historic Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission in the San Francisco Chronicle the day after the historic decision. Read the op-ed here.

Margaret Russell wrote an article on the pros and cons of television technologies in federal courts which was published in the January 20, 2010 issue of the Los Angeles and San Franciso Daily Journals. Russell states that “…in 2010 the tide is turning and the cameras are beginning to roll. It is time for our profession to address head-on the introduction of television technologies in federal courts. Compelling public interests are at stake, and the key question should be not whether, but how to balance these competing concerns in a technologically-advanced society. “

Patricia Cain wrote a Perspectives piece on the need for a federal solution to the same sex marriage issue in the January 15, 2010 issue of the Los Angeles and San Franciso Daily Journals. Cain states that the best route for a federal solution to the problem of each state having different laws is for the U.S. Supreme Court to constitutionalize the rights of same-sex couples to have their relationships recognized at the state level.

Anna Han discussed the attack on Google’s security systems in China and the resulting possibility that Google may pull out of China on ABC 7 (Bay Area News) and in the San Jose Mercury News.

Eric Goldman discussed the complex and thorough contracts that reality show hopefuls must agree to on CNN.

 

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Faculty News – 2009

Cookie Ridolfi and Maurice Possley’s article, “Broadcom is a Call to Watch Prosecutors,” appeared on the front page of the Daily Journal, Wednesday December 23, 2009.

Beth Van Schaack discussed Cambodia’s first war crimes tribunal, held in Cambodia instead of at the International Criminal Court at The Hague, with the Los Angeles Times.

Daniel Nishigaya, adjunct faculty and Santa Clara Law alumnus, was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to a judgeship in the Santa Clara County Superior Court. Nishigaya has served as supervising deputy district attorney for the Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office since 2006, where he previously served as deputy district attorney from 1996 to 2006.

David Yosifon was a panelist in a discussion of First Amendment issues at the Federal Trade Commission’s public forum on food marketing and childhood obesity. Yosifon argued that the “rational conception of human behavior” that underlies legal and societal assumptions about how a competitive marketplace works is no longer valid in an environment in which marketers can “exploit behavioral and neural techniques” to induce hunger, rather than simply offering products in response to consumer desires and behaviors. At minimum, a “more robust understanding” of what types of information are deemed “false and misleading” is needed, he maintained.

David Ball was a guest on the lunch show on KZSU (Stanford’s radio station).

Eric Goldman’s Technology & Marketing Law Blog made the Third Annual ABA Journal Blawg list of top 100 legal blogs.

Eric Goldman was quoted in numerous media outlets including The Star (South Africa) discussing the need for borderless technology law to avoid censorshi of the World Wide Web, and in U.S. News discussing a class-action lawsuit going through U.S. District Court that could provide a road map for those who find their work online without their authorization.

Jury Selection, The law, Art and Science of Selecting a Jury, co-authors James Gobert, Ellen Kreitzberg and Charles Rose, 3rd Edition, West Publisher was issued in November 2009.

Ellen Kreitzberg was interviewed on Hemisphere on KGNU Boulder, a one hour nationally syndicated radio show providing in depth discussion and analysis of current issues both national and international on the death penalty.

Catherine Sandoval was quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle discussing an antitrust case in which Intel Corporation is paying $1.25 billion to Advanced Micro Devices.

Cookie Ridolfi co-wrote “Prosecutor misconduct has a high public cost” an Op Ed that appeared in the San Jose Mercury News on Wednesday November 11, 2009. NCIP’s work was also featured in several stories in the San Jose Mercury News, Monterey Herald, and elsewhere, about efforts to exonerate Jack Edward Sagin, convicted of murder 20 years ago although DNA results now raise doubts about his guilt. The story quotes Rhonda Donato (NCIP).

On November 20 and 21, Linda Starr and Cookie Ridolfi appeared as featured speakers at two performances of the award winning play “The Exonerated”, at Golden State Theater in Monterey.

Catherine Sandoval was principal author, along with Allen Hammond, of a landmark study on minority commercial radio ownership entitled Minority Commercial Radio Ownership in 2009: FCC Licensing and Consolidation Policies, Entry Windows, and the Nexus Between Ownership, Diversity and Service in the Public Interest. The study examines more than 11,000 records from the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) Consolidated Database System (CDBS) and Internet sources on radio ownership and program formats in mid-2009 to analyze the effect of FCC licensing and multiple ownership policies on minority ownership of commercial radio stations, program diversification, and service to the American public. Professor Sandoval testified at the Federal Communications Commission in Washington D.C. at their Media Ownership Workshop, Policy Scholars Panel on November 2, 2009, as well as FCC hearings about internet policy on September 2 and October 2.

Anna Han gave a talk at USF on October 1 about “Intellectual Property in Emerging Markets”. The talk covered China and Bhutan and discuss policy implications of IP laws for emerging economies. Professor Han also spoke on October 21 at the Santa Clara Bar Association on “Negotiating and Drafting International Contracts”, where she discussed clauses that are important in international contracts such as forum selection, governing law, language etc.

Kandis Scott’s piece about death penalty reforms in China was in the Top Ten of SSRN’s Criminal Law (Public Law).

Cookie Ridolfi published “Prosecutors Run Amok,” an Op Ed that appeared in the San Francisco Daily Journal on Wednesday September 2, 2009.

Cookie Ridolfi and Jerry Uelmen presented the findings and recommendations of the California Commission on the Fair Administration of Justice at a death penalty seminar sponsored by the California Attorneys for Criminal Justice. The presentation included the findings of Ridolfi’s 2007 study, Prosecutorial Misconduct: A Systemic Review.

David Ball‘s paper entitled, “E Pluribus Unum: Data and Operations Integration in the California Criminal Justice System” was recently listed on SSRN’s Top Ten download list for LSN: Law Enforcement (e.g., Criminal Investigations, Police Conduct, etc.) (Topic).

An op-ed by Stephen Diamond about what new AFL-CIO chief Richard Trumka needs to do to keep labor unions relevant ran in eight papers or online newspaper sites including the Sacramento Bee, Bellingham Herald (WA), Buffalo News, the Tuscaloosa News (AL) and the Providence Journal-Bulletin (RI). He was also quoted in the Wall Street Journal about the challenges facing Trumka and the AFL-CIO and in the San Jose/Silicon Valley business journal about a former solar company CEO who sued the company over his dismissal.

Angelo Ancheta has received a one-year renewal grant of $34,385 from the State Bar of California to support the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center.

Stephanie M. Wildman recently published Pregnancy Discrimination and Social Change: Evolving Consciousness About a Worker’s Right to Job-Protected, Paid Leave (with Patricia A. Shiu), 21 Yale J.L. & Feminism 119 (2009).

This Article examines the change over the past few decades in U.S. law and societal attitudes concerning a worker’s right to job-protected, paid leave. Though common around the world, job-protected, paid leave eludes the U.S. workforce. The authors begin by considering the concept of work, its relation to identity, and the construction of safety nets for workers when they need income replacement. The Article considers the movement to establish job-protected, paid leave that encompasses and values a worker’s work, family, and personal life.

Margaret Russell has been appointed to the US Magistrate Selection Committee by Chief Judge Vaughn Walker of the US District Court for the Northern District of California. This work involves reviewing US magistrates whose terms are up for renewal, as well as filling new vacancies in the Northern District. (Russell continues to serve on Senator Barbara Boxer’s Judicial Nomination Advisory Committee, which makes recommendations for federal district judges and the US attorney for the Northern District.)

contributed three of the biographies in the recently published The Yale Biographical Dictionary of American Law, edited by Roger K. Newman. The volume contains 700 concise biographies of leading figures in the history of American law. Uelmen authored the entries for Stanley Mosk, Moman Prueitt and Gerry Spence. Uelmen’s presentation at the Southwestern University Law Review Symposium on Wrongful Convictions: Causes and Cures, was published in Volume 37 of the Southwestern University Law Review at pp. 1149-1162. Uelmen’s article, Too Costly to Kill, asking whether California can afford the death penalty, was published in California Lawyer Magazine for July, 2009. The latest installment in Uelmen’s annual survey of the work of the California Supreme Court appear Gerald Uelmens in the current September, 2009 issue of California Lawyer Magazine. Uelmen’s contribution to The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture will appear in the newest edition of that widely read tome. The article is entitled J.R.Poisson V. Etienne d’Avril, discussing a legendary judicial opinion authored as an April Fool’s joke by Justice Rose of the Arkansas Supreme Court. The opinion appears in its entirety in a collection of legal humor which Uelmen co-edited entitled Supreme Folly.

Stephen Diamond‘s new book From ‘Che’ to China: Labor and Authoritarianism in the New Global Economy will be published by Vandeplas Publishing this fall. Professor Diamond presented a paper on private equity and financialization at the Society for the Advancement of Socio-economics in Paris this summer. The paper will appear as a book chapter in The Embedded Firm a collection edited by Peer Zumbansen and Cynthia Williams in 2010. Professor Diamond’s paper measuring the impact of the IPO of the New York Stock Exchange with economist Jennifer Kuan of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research was presented at the Sloan Foundation Industry Studies conference in Chicago and the International Society for New Institutional Economics in Berkeley this past spring. Professor Diamond was named this summer as a “Scholar” in business ethics by the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics and a “Center Scholar” of the law school. Professor Diamond was recently interviewed by Forbes magazine and the Detroit Free Press on issues related to the restructuring of the U.S. Auto industry. Professor Diamond now also considers himself an expert in changing diapers and is available for consultation at his usual hourly rate to new fathers in the law school community.

Catherine Sandoval testified on September 2. 2009 at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) hearing in Washington D.C on Broadband Internet Measurement and Analysis. She emphasized the need to consider a variety of characteristics of Internet access such as limits imposed by Internet Service Providers on access to Internet applications, ability to use devices such as computers with the Internet Service and policies about usage to define the relevant market for broadband access, rather than focusing on the single dimension of minimum Internet speed offered that the FCC measured in past reports. She also highlighted the ongoing digital divide that resulted in only 59% of African-American households, 37% of Spanish-dominant households and 53% of low-income households having broadband Internet access in 2008.

Eric Goldman has been busy as usual. His article, “Brand Spillovers“, has been published by the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology. Another article, “Wikipedia’s Labor Squeezes and its Consequences“, will be coming out in the Journal of Telecommunications and High Technology Law. The article has received substantial media coverage, including write-ups in the Associated Press, CNET News.com, Ars Technica and numerous blogs. The popular legal blog “Above the Law” recently recognized Goldman as “one of the nation’s leading scholars in the areas of internet law and intellectual property”.

Goldman’s blogs have been recognized as, among other things:

Goldman is this year’s chair of the AALS Law & Computers Section. Finally, one of Goldman’s blog posts was recently cited by Judge Posner in Wiesmueller v. Kosobucki, a Seventh Circuit opinion about the Wisconsin Diploma Privilege.

Professor Jiri Toman lectured on protection of cultural property to the National Seminar organized by the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Ministry of Culture of Lebanon in Beirut. The Seminar adopted the recommendations to the national authorities.  Toman also taught at the National Seminar on the protection of cultural property organized by the Ministry of Culture of the Kingdom of Cambodia during spring break. Toman was the main speaker at the Commemorative seminar organized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The Seminar was organized for the 10 year anniversary of the adoption of the Second Protocol to the 1954 Hague Convention on the protection of cultural property in the event of armed conflict.

Toman spoke to the National Seminar on the protection of cultural property in Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) in July 2009 organized by the Ministry of Culture of the the Federation of Malaysia. He presented the 1954 Convention and the Protocols to much of the staff of the Ministry and the cultural institutions of Malaysia.

Toman was an examiner in the PhD Examination Jury of the Monash University in Australia (June-July 2009): thesis entitled “Australia’s international disaster response – laws, rules and principles”, submitted by Mr. Michael Ernest Eburn, PhD candidate.

Currently, Toman is working on the Commentary to the 1999 Second Protocol to the 1954 Hague Convention and on the article to be published by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands.

Law Lecturer Tom Klein wrote an article on the new software paradigm known as Enterprise 3.0, published on the Enterprise 2.0 blog. Read the article here.

Professor Beth Van Schaack is a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University’s Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law for Academic Year 2009-2010. She is researching the impact of international criminal law on women and the impact of women on international criminal law.

Professor Eric Goldman continues to be a ubiquitous media source for tech-law reporters. His comments to Associated Press and others about Wikipedia’s future were carried by well over 100 publications, including papers in Atlanta, Columbus, Ohio, Toronto, Casper, Wyoming, Akron, Rapid City, Tulsa, San Diego and Sydney. He was also mentioned in CNET, China Post, BusinessWeek online, and Capital Radio. Among other assorted stories, he was quoted in UPI and other stories about a Facebook privacy-invasion lawsuit, and in InformationWeek on Google’s fight against a subpoena. He was also quoted in a San Jose Mercury News article about Apple and Palm’s possibly illegal non-poaching agreement. And in a Santa Clara first, a reporter from InternetNEws.com quoted part of Goldman’s “Tweet” (a 140-character posting on Twitter) about a lawsuit he considered frivolous.

Law Lecturer and International Law Scholar Art Gemmell‘s book review was recently published in The Annual Survey of International and Comparative Law, Spring, 2009 (15 Ann. Surv. Int’l & Comp. L. 153). Art Gemmell also reviewed: Contemporary Issues on Public International and Comparative Law: Essays in Honor of Professor Dr. Christian Nwachukwu Okeke.

Pat Cain recently placed several pieces in the past several months: First, she completed the 2008 Supplement for her textbook, SEXUALITY LAW (Carolina Academic Press 2008, with Arthur Leonard) and published the following articles:

  • “Taxing Families Fairly,” 48 SANTA CLARA LAW REVIEW 805 (2008),
  •  “Gay Rights in the United States,” in LGBTQ AMERICAN TODAY, ed, John Hawley (Greenwood Press, November 2008); Estate, Tax and Benefits Planning for Unmarried Couples (with Burda, Goffe, and Kolz)(ALI ABA 2009);
  • “Two Sisters versus a Father and Two Sons: The Story of Sawado v. Endo,” in Property Stories, Gerald Kornbloom and Andy Morriss, eds., 2d edition (Foundation Press 2009);
  • “In re Marriage Cases: Six Cases in Search of a Decision” (with Jean Love), in Wildman and Schneider, eds, Women and the Law Stories (forthcoming 2009)(in press);
  • “DOMA and the Internal Revenue Code, __ CHICAGO-KENT L. REV. __ (2009)(forthcoming in press);
  • “Unmarried Couples and the Mortgage Interest Deduction,” TAX NOTES (April 27, 2009) at page 473.

David Sloss also placed an article titled  The Constitutional Right to a Treaty Preemption Defense in the Univ. of Toledo L. Rev., (2009), and entered into a  contract with Cambridge University Press for a book entitled “The U.S. Supreme Court and International Law: Continuity or Change?” The book has two co-editors and about 15 contributing authors, and, importantly, almost all the contributing authors will be attending a conference at Santa Clara in November 2009 to present and discuss their respective contributions for the book.

David Ball received a great mention on Doug Berman’s Sentencing Law and Policy blog, which is a major blog for people who do criminal and sentencing law issues.  Berman writes about David’s article in the June 2009 issue of the Columbia Law Review, titled “Heinous, Atrocious, and Cruel: Apprendi, Indeterminate Sentencing, and the Meaning of Punishment.”  Berman stated that “David Ball’s article merits a place on any Top 10 list of must-read pieces concerning the Supreme Court’s modern sentencing jurisprudence.” The link to the blog is: http://sentencing.typepad.com/sentencing_law_and_policy/2009/06/great-new-article-on-apprendi-and-parole-in-columbia-law-review.html

Kandis Scott‘s article, titled “Why Did China Reform Its Death Penalty?” will be published in the Pacific Rim Law and Policy Journal (Univ. of Washington) in January, 2010. This is a peer reviewed journal.

Multi-Media Stars and Darlings: The Law Faculty also got involved in the national and local limelight concerning judicial appointments and other topics. A partial list of these appearances are: Bradley Joondeph, Lia Epperson, Margaret Russell, Cathy Sandoval and Gerald Uelmen were all sought out by the media, with the nomination of Judge Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court; the mixed verdict on Proposition 8, and a key racial-discrimination case before the Supreme Court. Sandoval shared her memories of her longtime friend Sotomayor with CBS5, while Joondeph handled more than a dozen radio interviews nationwide the day after the nomination.  Ellen Kreitzberg appeared on ABC7 to discuss the historic importance of Judge Sotomayor’s appointment to the Supreme Court. An op-ed on the value of empathy by Margaret Russell and Marilyn Edelstein (English Department) ran in the Oakland Tribune, the Tri-Valley Herald, the Daily Review, the Fremont Argus, the Alameda Times-Star, and InsideBayArea.com. Susan Morse wrote an analysis piece that ran in Tax Notes and Worldwide Tax Daily, on the use of intermediaries. Cynthia Mertens was quoted in the National Law Journal and Legal Times about SCU Law’s academic integrity policy. A flurry of tech cases involving Craigslist, Facebook, and Google sent reporters from American Lawyer, CNet, Dow Jones, Reuters, and others to Eric Goldman for context and insight. Gerald Uelmen was quoted in the New York Times about Supreme Court contender Carlos Moreno and Prop. 8, and by the LA Times on death penalty issues.

Evangeline Abriel published The VAWA Manual: Immigration Relief for Abused Immigrants (with Sally Kinoshita) (5th edition 2008).  She also presented a two-day training (with Peggy Gleason of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network) in preparation for the transition to U.S. immigration law in the CNMI starting November of 2009.

Stephen Smith placed the following articles:

  • “Teaching Practical Procedure in the Legal Writing classroom,” 17 Perspectives: Teaching Legal Research and Writing 31 (2008).
  • “Using the ADA to Teach the Interaction of Statutes,” The Second Draft: Newsletter of the Legal Writing Institute, Fall 2008, at 10.
  • “Creating a Research File – Transition from One-L to Summer Legal Work,” Podcast Series, Suffolk University Law School (2008)
  • “The Poetry of Persuasion: Early Literary Theory and its Advice to Legal Writers,” 6 Journal of the Association of Legal Writing Directors (J.ALWD) 55-74 (Fall 2009).

Two books by LARAW faculty member Yvonne Ekern and Adjunct LARAW faculty member Joanne Banker Hames — INTRODUCTION TO LAW (4th ed. 2010) and LEGAL RESEARCH, ANALYSIS, AND WRITING (3d ed. 2009) — were recently published by Pearson Prentice Hall.

LARAW faculty member Rachel Smith was awarded an ALWD (Association of Legal Writing Directors) summer grant for this past summer.

The Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center received a $300,000 federal grant to help victims of human trafficking.

The Northern California Innocence Project received a $236,000 award from the Department of Justice to fund a supervising attorney position for a period of eighteen months.

The Northern California Innocence Project received a $2.4 million dollar grant award from the National Institute of Justice to create the California DNA Project, which will systematically identify and review select California cases for testable DNA evidence, and in appropriate cases, seek testing of that evidence.

The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics awarded Hackworth Grants for Research in Applied Ethics to, among other faculty, two law school faculty members:

  • Susie Morse, to support work on a project called, “Selling a Value Added Tax: The Ethical Limits of Government Persuasion.” Professor Morse is examining the ethical constraints on government efforts to persuade the public to accept a value-added tax, which is considered by some experts to be necessary in light of the size of current federal budget deficits.
  • David Sloss, to support work on a conference to be held next spring at the SCU Law School called, “Corporations and International Law.” Professor Sloss is the Director of the Law School’s Center for Global Law and Policy, which annually hosts on campus a major conference on international law and on many related ethical issues.

Assistant Dean Jeanette Leach received $50,000 from the Law School Admission Council to support ” Prelaw Undergraduate Scholars Program (PLUS), Summer 2009.”

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