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Press for Justice – Winter 2015

Dear friends of the Center,

Happy New Year! We are excited to bring you news and information about the Center for Social Justice and Public Service at Santa Clara Law. This academic year has been quite productive; we hope you will enjoy learning about our work and perhaps identify ways to get involved.We are fortunate to have continued support of alumni volunteer Laura Best and our undergraduate student Jared O’Rourke. Below is a recap of fall 2014 and information about upcoming spring events – join us!

Plan to attend the 17th Annual Trina Grillo Public Interest and Social Justice Law Retreat on Friday, March 20 – Saturday, March 21, 2015. Receive MCLE credit and connect with public interest and social justice oriented law students, faculty, and practitioners.

We could not do this important work without your support. We thank you!

Deborah Moss-West and Margalynne Armstrong
Center for Social Justice and Public Service

Deborah Moss-West
Deborah Moss-West
Margalynne Armstrong
Margalynne Armstrong

 

 

 

 


 

PUBLIC INTEREST AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW BOARD INVITATION and APPLICATIONS FOR 2015 SUMMER GRANTS

The Public Interest and Social Justice Law Board (“Law Board”) seeks alumni to join the Law Board to help raise money to fund student summer work for social justice and other public interest work. Law Board funding priorities include: law student summer grants; income supplement grants for alumni; and scholarships for current students.

For summer 2014, thirty-one students received support, representing over 12,000 hours of free legal service for low-income communities and families. These internships enable law students to gain hands-on, professional skills that enhance their legal education. The Law Board member fundraising commitment is modest and the impact of the work is priceless. The Board meets four times per year. Contact Deborah Moss-West to learn more about the Law Board and how you can support law students, alumni, and others who share a commitment to marginalized, subordinated, or underrepresented clients and causes. Read more.

We are raising funds for law students applying for 2015 summer grants. Click the link below for more information. With support from the Law School community and generous donors, we will continue to provide law student summer grants. Please help keep the program strong!

Hear from Law Students about the work summer grants make possible:

Lizbeth MateoThe experience not only gave me a better understanding of how the immigration system works, but of the importance and need of institutions like Legal Aid in providing proper legal representation to low income clients. Hearing the clients’ stories and helping them tell those stories to the immigration authority was both truly inspiring and one of the hardest things I have done so far. Their stories motivate me to keep on going, to keep fighting for what I believe.”

Lizbeth Mateo ’16
Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles County

 

Information for 2015 Summer Grant Applicants

PRO BONO PLACEMENT PROJECT

The Pro Bono Placement Project works to identify non-profit and public interest organizations that have a need for law student volunteers during the academic year. The Project allows students to serve community legal needs while also creating vital networking opportunities and invaluable skills training. In fall 2014, over 20 students were placed in pro bono positions at 10 organizations. We are thrilled to have a vibrant program. If your legal services organization needs volunteers, please contact
socialjustice@scu.edu.


UPCOMING SPRING EVENTS

These events are open to both students and the general public, allowing the entire SCU community to take advantage of this unique opportunity. For additional information about events listed, email socialjustice@scu.edu

SPRING 2015 SOCIAL JUSTICE DIVERSITY LECTURE The Center for Social Justice and Public Service offers at least two major lectures each year featuring scholarship focused on diversity issues.

February 12, 2015
at 4:00 p.m., Wiegand Room, Arts & Sciences followed by a Wine and Cheese Reception.
Daria Roithmayr (USC Law)
“Reproducing Racism: How Everyday Choices Lock in White Advantage”
MCLE credit


SPRING 2015 VISITING PRACTITIONER The visiting practitioner program brings prominent attorneys to campus to counsel students on pursuing public interest and social justice careers and to share their work.

Thursday, January 29, 2015
from noon to 1 p.m. in Bannann 135, Wine and Cheese Reception at 5:30 p.m., Bergin Strong Common Room
Yvonne Mariajimenez (Neighborhood Legal Services of Los Angeles County)
“Why Public Interest Law Matters”


17th ANNUAL TRINA GRILLO PUBLIC INTEREST AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW RETREAT

Friday, March 20 & Saturday, March 21
Santa Clara Law

Re-Imagining Social Justice Lawyering: The Next Generation

The Center for Social Justice and Public Service, along with Consortium Law Schools, will host the next Trina Grillo Retreat. The Retreat provides a unique opportunity for law students, faculty, and practitioners to exchange viewpoints, explore career opportunities, and formulate creative strategies for social justice.

Retreat Highlights include:
Law Student Community Service Project
Remembering Trina Grillo
Social Justice Advocates Describe Their Approach to Practice
Launch Your Practice with Pro Bono and Experiential Learning
Social Justice Entrepreneurialism
Dean’s Roundtable – Social Justice and Legal Education
Career Strategies Groups
Using Technology and Social Media to Change the World
And more!

To learn more and to register email Deborah Moss-West.


FALL 2014 EVENT HIGHLIGHTS

FALL 2014 VISITING PRACTITIONER
Paul Henderson
(Mayor’s Office, San Francisco)

Public Interest Law is a Life Choice; Not Just a Career Choice Frontline Reflections from a Public Servant and Political Scientist

On September 25, 2014, the Center welcomed Paul Henderson, Chief of Staff for Mayor Ed Lee of San Francisco. View his presentation.

 


FALL 2014 SOCIAL JUSTICE DIVERSITY LECTURE
Professor Ian F. Haney Lopez
(Berkeley Law)

Dog Whistle Politics: Race and Surging Wealth Inequality for All

On October 23, 2014, the Center hosted Professor Ian Haney-Lopez. Hear his lecture.

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Press for Justice – Winter 2014

Dear friends of the Center,

We hope your new year is off to a wonderful start; this is certainly a productive academic year. We are fortunate to have continued support of alumni volunteer Laura Best and our undergraduate student worker Jared O’Rourke. Following is a recap of the Center’s fall activities and information about upcoming spring events – join us!

Be sure to register for the Spring 2014 Public Interest and Social Justice Law Conference, “Law and Social Justice: From Theory to Practice,” on April 11, 2014. Read more below.

Stephanie Wildman, Margalynne Armstrong, Deborah Moss-West, and Sandra Vega

Center for Social Justice and Public Service

Stephanie Wildman
Stephanie Wildman
Margalynne Armstrong
Margalynne Armstrong
Deborah Moss-West
Deborah Moss-West
Sandra-Vega-2014
Sandra Vega

Let’s stay connected – sign up for the Center email list and like us on facebook.


PUBLIC INTEREST AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW BOARD INVITATION and APPLICATIONS FOR 2014 SUMMER GRANTS

The Public Interest and Social Justice Law Board (“Law Board”) seeks alumni to join the Law Board to help raise money to fund student summer work for social justice and other public interest work. Law Board funding priorities include: law student summer grants; income supplement grants for alumni; and scholarships for current students.

For summer 2013, the Law Board funded 22 law student summer grants, representing over 8,800 hours of free legal service for low-income communities and families. The Law Board member fundraising commitment is modest and the impact of the work is priceless. The Board meets four times per year. Contact Deborah Moss-West or Stephanie Wildman to learn more about the Law Board and how you can support law students, alumni, and others who share a commitment to marginalized, subordinated, or underrepresented clients and causes. Read more.

We are raising funds for law students applying for 2014 summer grants. Click the link below for more information and application due dates. With support from the Law School community and generous donors, we will continue to provide law student summer grants. We are proud that many careers began with the support of a summer grant; please help keep the program strong!

Hear from Law Students about the work summer grants makes possible:

Diego AvilesDiego Aviles ’15
Neighborhood Legal Services of Los Angeles County
“Being able to work with individuals from my community while learning practical experience in my desired field – was fantastic. I was able to assist low-income individuals with their immigration needs and make connections with experienced attorneys dedicated to their clients. I feel more confident now than ever that this is what I want to do. I am grateful for the opportunity I was given this past summer.”

Support the Center

Information for 2014 Summer Grant Applicants


PRO BONO PLACEMENT PROJECT

The Pro Bono Placement Project works to identify organizations that have a need for volunteers during the academic year. The Project allows students to serve community legal needs while also creating vital networking opportunities and invaluable skills training. In fall 2013, over 30 students were placed in pro bono positions at ten organizations. We are thrilled about the growing interest in this project. If your legal services organization needs volunteers, please contact Deborah Moss-West.


UPCOMING SPRING EVENTS

These events are open to both students and the general public, allowing the entire SCU community to take advantage of this unique opportunity. For additional information about events listed, contact Sandra Vega svega@scu.edu

Spring 2014 SOCIAL JUSTICE DIVERSITY LECTURE The Center for Social Justice and Public Service offers at least two major lectures each year featuring scholarship focused on diversity issues.

February 6, 2014
Beverly I. Moran (Vanderbilt University Law School)
“Excellence and Diversity”
Listen to the talk

 

 


SPRING 2014 VISITING PRACTITIONER The visiting practitioner program brings prominent attorneys to campus to counsel students on pursuing public interest and social justice careers and to share their work.

Thursday, March 13, 2014
from noon to 1 p.m. in Bannann 135, Wine and Cheese Reception at 5:30 p.m., Bannan Hall Student Lounge.
Keith Wattley (UnCommon Law)
“Gain Insight into California Prisons”


SPRING 2014 SOCIAL JUSTICE WORKSHOP: Law and Labor in the Fields – led by Professor Stephen F. Diamond

This seminar will examine the relationship between legal institutions and farm labor, in California and elsewhere, both in the U.S. and internationally. Labor organizing, immigration, technology and other issues will be covered. Seminar begins at 4:05 pm, Bannan Hall 333. Reception follows. Public welcome. MCLE credit available.

Upcoming Presentations:

2014 zilbermanFebruary 20, 2014
David Zilberman (University of California, Berkeley)
“Science and the Farm: Impact of GM Food and Pesticides”

 


Ruben GarciaFebruary 27, 2014
Ruben Garcia (UNLV Law)
“Marginal Workers: How Legal Fault Lines Divided Worksers and Leave Them without Protection”

 

 


Maria OntiverosMarch 13, 2014
Maria Ontiveros (University of San Francisco)
“Noncitizen Immigrant Labor and the 13th Ammendment”

 


David SmithMarch 27, 2014
David Smith (University of Kansas, Department of Sociology)
“The Disposseessed: Rural Proletarians, Forced Laborers, and Former Farmers, from California to Rwanda”

 


April 11, 2014 SPRING SOCIAL JUSTICE CONFERENCE

LAW AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE
Friday, April 11, 2014
Santa Clara University Campus

The daily news decries the state of legal education-too much debt, too many lawyers, no jobs for graduates. These discussions rarely mention that low-income people need more lawyers or that the field of social justice law provides opportunities for law grads to follow the passions that brought them to law school, including serving others and seeking justice.

This conference provides a forum for practitioners, academics, and students to consider the current state of social justice law against the backdrop of this national conversation about legal education. Morning sessions will focus on social justice law theory and afternoon sessions will concentrate on different ways to practice and fund social justice law.

This conference also provides an opportunity to remember and honor John Calmore (1945-2009) (center), a fierce warrior for social justice, whose teaching and practice inspire us all. With Martha Mahoney and Stephanie Wildman , John co-authored Social Justice: Professionals, Communities, and Law 2d (2013). This conference celebrates the publication of that second edition as well as two new books: (1) Scott Cummings and Alan Chen, Public Interest Lawyering: A Contemporary Perspective (2012) and (2) Juliet Brodie, Clare Pastore, Ezra Rosser, and Jeffrey Selbin, Poverty Law, Policy, and Practice (forthcoming 2014).

Our keynote address will be delivered by Catharine Wells, Professor of Law and Law School Fund Research Scholar at Boston College Law School. She is a nationally recognized expert on pragmatism and its relationship to American legal theory.

Read more and register online today.


FALL 2013 HIGHLIGHTS

CONSTITUTION DAY FOR YOUTH
In partnership with the Dean’s Office, Law Diversity Programs, and the Marshall-Brennan Project, Santa Clara Law hosts Constitution Day for Youth. On September 13, 2013, students from 4 local high schools spent all day learning about the US Constitution, rights and responsibilities in a fun, interactive, environment. While on campus, the students participated in mock law classes, learned about the college admissions process, engaged in debates and interacted with faculty, staff, undergraduate/law students, and alumni. A special thanks to the volunteer attorneys and faculty who led the classroom discussions – Prof. Marina Hsieh, Brian Diaz ’11, David Epps ’92, Eugene Flammate, Gregory Lemmons ’07, Eric Medefesser ’11, and Erika Rivera ’07. The day would not have been possible without law student volunteers.

We would also like to thank Dean Kloppenberg, Associate Provost and Professor Aldo Billingslea and everyone who helped makes this an amazing event. Discoverlaw.org and La Raza Lawyers Association were the event sponsors, the University Office of Diversity and Inclusion supplied SCU aluminum water bottles, and Wilson Sonsoni Goodrich & Rosati gave swag for the bags. Students enjoyed learning about the Constitution and the legal profession. Get be involved next fall, contact event coordinators, Assistant Dean Jeanette Leach, Michael Chavez ’08, or Deborah Moss-West.


BENEFIT FOR JUSTICE
The annual Benefit for Justice brings together the legal community and Santa Clara Law for a night of socializing and fundraising to support the public interest and social justice summer work of law students.

This year’s Benefit, held on Friday, September 27, 2013, was attended by a wonderful mix of law students, professors, alumni, friends, families, and attorneys from the community. Every year, we are grateful for the generous support from the community; this year was no different. if you missed out this year, come next fall and see what all the fuss is about!

Social Justice Service Awards were awarded to two attorneys and two law students who have significantly contributed to the social justice and public interest community through their work or volunteer efforts: Ramon Arias (Executive Director, Bay Area Legal Aid); Dale Minami (Partner, Minami and Tamaki); Karla De La Torre ’14; and Hugo Meza ’14.

A special thank you to the law student Benefit Committee: Co-Chairs – Michelle McCully ’14 and Sophia Areias ’14 and Volunteer Coordinator – Catherine Nguyen ’15.

Funds raised from the Benefit give students the chance to take part in unpaid social justice and public interest summer positions – positions that can launch a public interest career.


Fall 2013 Wrongful Convictions: The Heart of the Matter – led by Kathleen Ridolfi

This fall’s Social Justice Workshop featured guest lectures by nationally recognized experts on the leading causes of wrongful conviction. Students studied these causes, including mistaken eyewitness identification, false confessions, unreliable jailhouse informant testimony, stakeholder tunnel vision, unsound so-called forensic sciences, and prosecutorial error or misconduct, from legal, ethical, scientific, and psychological perspectives. The course also introduced students to the methodology used to investigate claims of actual innocence and the legal hurdles to achieving exoneration within the criminal justice framework. The class also addressed policy considerations such as legislative and non-legislative reforms and the power of legal/social science research in advancing data-driven law reform.

Speakers List:
Brandon Garrett (University of Virginia Law School) – Judging Innocence
Jennifer Dysart (John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City) –TBD
Keith A. Findley (University of Wisconsin Law School) – The Multiple Dimension of Tunnel Vision
Steve Drizin (Northwestern Law School) –False Confession
Nina Morrison (Innocence Project) – TBD
Cliff Gardner (Law Offices of Cliff Gardner) – Ineffective Assistance of Counsel


In Fall 2013, the Center hosted Cynthia Lee.

Diversity Lecture – Cynthia Lee (George Washington Law School)
Making Race Salient: Trayvon Martin and Implicit Bias in a Not yet Post-Racial Society

On October 24th Professor Cynthia Lee, George Washington University Law School, delivered an address entitled “Making Race Salient: Trayvon Martin and Implicit Bias in a Not yet Post-Racial Society” which dealt with the evolving role of race in the wake of the Trayvon Martin killing.

Professor Lee began her lecture by discussing the facts of the Trayvon Martin case and the many issues surrounding it. She asserted that as Americans today believe race is no longer an issue or that we live in a post racial society, their racial biases become subconscious. Therefore, those in charge of the Zimmerman trial did the community a huge disservice by never directly addressing race despite its influence. Recent research has found that calling attention to race helps people recognize their subconscious racial thoughts.

Thank you for your many contributions to public interest and social justice at Santa Clara Law!


Press for Justice – Summer 2013

Dear friends of the CSJ,

We hope your summer is off to a wonderful start. We are excited to bring you news and information about public interest and social justice programs at Santa Clara Law. Center events are open to the entire campus and legal community. We hope you will join our efforts and help keep Santa Clara Law’s public interest and social justice programs strong.

Let’s stay connected – sign up for the Center email list and like us on Facebook.

Have a great summer!

Deborah Moss-West, Margalynne Armstrong, Stephanie Wildman, and Sandra Vega (not pictured) Center for Social Justice and Public Service

Center for Social Justice and Public Service

Deborah Moss-West, Margalynne Armstrong, Stephanie Wildman

Let’s stay connected – sign up for the Center email list and like us on facebook.

2012-2013 ACADEMIC YEAR HIGHLIGHTS

  • For summer 2013, 22 law students received summer grants, representing over 8,800 hours of free legal service for low-income communities and families.
  • 74 law students contributed 50 hours or more of pro bono service during the 2012-2013 academic year, representing over 12,250 hours of service in the community. law.scu.edu/careers/pro-bono-recognition-program.
  • 34 law students earned Public Interest and Social Justice Law Certificates upon graduation.  Santa Clara Law also offers the certificate with a special emphasis in consumer law, critical race jurisprudence, criminal justice, health law and immigration and refugee law. law.scu.edu/socialjustice/certificate-and-curriculum
  • In fall 2012, 5 law students served as inaugural year Marshall-Brennan Fellows, weekly teaching over 100 high school students about Constitutional rights and responsibilities.
  • Each year, hundreds of law students participate in the Social Justice Thursday Speakers Series, the Social Justice Workshop, public interest and social justice classes, Public Interest Law Career Services activities, and the student Public Interest and Social Justice Coalition.

UPCOMING EVENTS AND PROJECT UPDATES

SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 BENEFIT FOR JUSTICE

The annual Benefit for Justice brings together the local legal community and Santa Clara Law for a night of socializing and fundraising for student summer work. The funds raised from the Benefit for Justice make it possible for students to take unpaid positions that not only assist communities that need legal services but often launch student’s public interest careers.

Mark your calendar and plan to attend the Benefit for Justice on Friday, September 27, 2013, on Santa Clara’s campus. Meet, mingle, and support law student summer work. To learn more visit law.scu.edu/socialjustice/benefit-for-justice or to donate contact the law student Benefit Committee.

2013 Benefit Committee:
Michelle McCully ’14 – Benefit Co-Chair, mmccully@scu.edu
Sophia Areias ’14 – Benefit Co-Chair, sareias@scu.edu
Catherine Nguyen ’15 – Volunteer Coordinator

OCTOBER 24, 2013 DIVERSITY LECTURE

Cynthia LeeCynthia Lee (The George Washington University Law School)
Making Race Salient: Trayvon Martin and Implicit Bias in a Not yet Post-Racial Society
4:00pm., followed by a Wine and Cheese Reception

Cynthia Lee is the Charles Kennedy Poe Research Professor of Law at The George Washington University Law School where she teaches Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure, and Professional Responsibility. She is currently visiting at UC Hastings College of Law. She is the author of Murder and the Reasonable Man: Passion and Fear in the Criminal Courtroom (NYU Press 2003), a book that examines the reasonableness requirement in the doctrines of self-defense and provocation, and Criminal Law: Cases and Materials (with Angela Harris) (West 2d ed). She is also the editor of Searches and Seizures: The Fourth Amendment, Its Constitutional History and the Contemporary Debate (Prometheus Books 2011).

April 11, 2014 SPRING SOCIAL JUSTICE CONFERENCE

Law and Social Justice: From Theory to Practice
The daily news decries the state of legal education – too much debt, too many lawyers, no jobs for graduates. These discussions rarely mention that low income people need more lawyers or that the field of social justice law provides opportunities for law grads to follow the passion that brought them to law school – seeking justice.

This conference offers a forum for practitioners, academics, and students to consider the current state of social justice law against the backdrop of this national conversation about legal education. Morning sessions will focus on social justice law theory and afternoon sessions will concentrate on different ways to fund and practice social justice law.

This conference also provides an opportunity to remember and honor John Calmore, a fierce warrior for social justice, whose teaching and practice inspire a model for us all.

PUBLIC INTEREST AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW BOARD INVITATIO

The Public Interest and Social Justice Law Board (“Law Board”) seeks alumni to join the Law Board to help raise money to fund student summer work for social justice and other public interest work. Law Board funding priorities include: law student summer grants; income supplement grants for alumni; and scholarships for current students.

The Law Board member fundraising commitment is modest and the impact of the work is priceless. For the summer 2013 grants, the Law Board funded $82,500 for 17 students working as volunteers with public interest and social justice organizations. These organizations include: Bay Area Legal Aid, Eviction Defense Collaborative, New America Foundation, National Labor Relations Board, San Diego US Attorney’s Office, Legal Services of Northern California, Santa Clara County Office of the District Attorney, Prisoner Legal Services, Law Foundation of Silicon Valley, California Coastal Commission, East Bay Sanctuary Covenant, Monterey County Public Defender, Securities & Exchange Commission, and Legal Aid of San Mateo County.

The Board meets four times per year. Contact Deborah Moss-West or Stephanie Wildman to learn more about the Law Board and how you can support law students, alumni, and others who share a commitment to marginalized, subordinated, or underrepresented clients and causes.

PRO BONO PLACEMENT PROJECT

The Pro Bono Placement Project works to identify organizations that have a need for volunteers during the academic year. The Project allows students to serve community legal needs while also creating vital networking opportunities and invaluable skills training. We are thrilled about the growing interest in this project. If your legal services organization needs volunteers, please contact Deborah Moss-West, dmosswest@scu.edu.

SPRING 2013 HIGHLIGHTS

SPRING 2013 SOCIAL JUSTICE WORKSHOP: PUBLIC SERVICE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW PRACTICE

Professor Margaret Russell taught the Spring 2013 Social Justice Workshop, “Public Service and Social Justice Law Practice”. The class provided both an overview of the problems faced by indigent and otherwise disadvantaged communities and an introduction to lawyering skills needed to assist these clients. The course focused on social justice lawyering theory and practice through a range of perspectives and approaches, including litigation, legislation, policy making, media education, community organizing, and coalition building. The workshop featured several public lectures from renowned scholars and practitioners including: Susan Mizner (American Civil Liberties Union Disability Rights Project), “A Valentine to the ADA: Why I Love Disability Rights Law and You Should, Too”; Michael Adams (SAGE USA, Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders), “Aging through an LGBT Lens: A Social Justice Perspective”; Margaret A. Burnham (Northeastern University School of Law), “Civil Rights and Restorative Justice: Why the Past Still Matters”; and Anthony D. Romero (National American Civil Liberties Union), “Leading the Charge: Protecting and Expanding Constitutional Rights in the Face of Popular Opposition.”

 

SPRING 2013 VISITING PRACTITIONER

Dori Rose Inda (Watsonville Law Center) delivered the Spring 2013 Visiting Practitioner talk entitled “Turning Vision into Mission as an Accidental Leader.” She opened by describing the operations of the Watsonville Law Center which provides free legal services to low income individuals primarily in the areas of consumer law, workers compensation, and employment law. Ms. Inda then told her story, from her motivation for applying to law school to how she founded the Watsonville Law Center. She highlighted Santa Clara Law’s immense impact on her and her career.  She worked at the law school’s East San Jose Community Law Center (now the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center KGACLC) and became acquainted with combining law and social justice. One day, Ms. Inda met a client who had come all the way from Watsonville to seek legal services. As an undocumented immigrant he had no available services in the Monterey Bay area. The client experiences at KGACLC inspired Ms. Inda to explore opening a community law center in the Watsonville area. Since 2002 the Watsonville Law Center has steadily grown, allowing it to better help the underserved community of the greater Watsonville area.

Ms. Inda advised students to heed advice from others, regardless if they think it is immediately relevant, for it might make all the difference later in life. She also advised students to reach out to the greater Santa Clara community for it is rich with support. To view Ms. Inda’s talk, visit law.scu.edu/socialjustice/videos

2013 PUBLIC INTEREST AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW CONFERENCE
Opening Doors to the Legal Profession Strengthening the Diversity Pipeline

This year, the Center for Social Justice and Public Service had the unique opportunity of supporting the Society of American Law Teachers’ (SALT) in hosting “Opening Doors to the Legal Profession by Strengthening the Diversity Pipeline” on March 13, 2013. The Conference brought together for a day of learning pre-law advisors, bar administrators, law school deans and admissions officers, scholars, diversity activists, and potential applicants.

Assistant Dean Bryan Hinkle commented, “Santa Clara Law has long understood the importance of having a diverse student body which enriches the law school learning environment. Despite an increasingly diverse population, people from diverse backgrounds have been and continue to be underrepresented in the legal profession. Programs like ‘Opening Doors to the Legal Profession by Strengthening the Diversity Pipeline’ demonstrate Santa Clara’s commitment to diversity.”

The day began with a keynote address on “Why the Diversity Pipeline Matters” by the Honorable Edward J. Davila, United States District Court, Northern District of California (San Jose), followed by the morning plenary session exploring “Beyond the LSAT, Beyond the Rankings.” Throughout the day prospective students and professionals had breakout sessions exploring topics from their perspectives including undergraduate advising and mentoring, LSAT study and personal statement preparation tips, how diverse students succeed, and skills and attributes of successful attorneys. The afternoon plenary session “Managing Costs, Managing Debt,” provided practical information on financing a legal education. Attendees had multiple opportunities to network and actively engage. Noontime included a “Bar Association Fair” with information on how to connect before, during and after law school. Over 10 law schools participated in the Law School Fair and Reception at the conclusion of the day.

Conference speakers included: Lani Cossette, Esq. (Microsoft); Kristen L. Holmquist (Director of Academic Support Programs/Associate Director of Professional Skills, Berkeley Law); Holly Nguyen, Esq. (Senior Patent Attorney, Microsoft Corporation); Hazel Weiser (Consultant, ERASE Racism NY); Fabian Renteria (For People of Color, Inc. and Equal Justice Society); David Tsai, Esq. (Perkins Coie LLP); Deborah Moss-West (Assistant Director, Santa Clara Law); Jeffrey Hanson (Jeffrey Hanson Financial Services); Bryan Hinkle (Assistant Dean, Law Enrollment Services, Santa Clara Law); Rodney Fong (Assistant Dean for Bar Exam Services, Golden Gate University School of Law); Jeanette Leach (Assistant Dean Diversity Programs, Santa Clara Law); Teri Cannon (Educational Consultant); Leigh Allen (Mentoring & Development Director, Council on Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO)); Professor Shahabudeen Khan (Shephard Broad Law Center, NOVA Southeastern University); Malia Vella (District Director, Office of Assemblymember Bill Quirk); and Lynda Cevallos (Pre-Law Coordinator, CLEO).

Dean Jeanette Leach summed up the event: “The diverse range of topics explored was really awesome.wonderful to see undergraduate advisors engaged and learning how to counsel students of color about law school admission, how to prepare them for the LSAT, and how very important the diversity pipeline is to law schools.”

PUBLIC INTEREST AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW CELEBRATION AND GRADUATION CEREMONY

On May 23, a celebration and graduation ceremony acknowledged student and faculty scholarship and work in public interest and social justice law. Dean Donald J. Polden opened the ceremony and Lizbeth Najera ’13 delivered the student address. The keynote speaker, the Honorable Shelyna V. Brown ’96 Superior Court of Santa Clara County, challenged students to always strive for “excellence.”

The ceremony recognized Public Interest and Social Justice Law Scholars, Public Interest and Social Justice Law Board, Fr. Paul Goda, and Mary Emery Summer Grant awardees, Justice John Paul Stevens Public Interest Fellowship honorees, Harry and Jean Gluck Social Justice Law Fellowship recipients, Marshall-Brennan Leadership Development and Constitutional Literacy Project Fellows, and Pro Bono Recognition Program Awardees.

Shelyna V. Brown '96

Honorable Shelyna V. Brown ’96

Stephanie Wildman and Dean Donald Polden

Stephanie Wildman with Dean Donald Polden

The Herman and Edith Wildman Social Justice Law Writing Award recipient was Hazella Bowmani ’14 for her essay “The Significance of Stereotypes in Adjudicating LGBT Asylum Claims.” Laura Best ’80, received a Public Interest and Social Justice Law Recognition Awardfor her volunteer efforts with the Center since 2011. Dean Donald J. Polden received a Public Interest and Social Justice Law Recognition Award for his ten years of outstanding service to Santa Clara Law. The ceremony also recognized Yan Li ’13 for her contributions as a Public Interest Law Career Services student coordinator.

A special thank you to the law student Benefit Committee: Alexander Cunny ’13 – Benefit Chair, Michelle McCully ’14 – Event Coordinator, and Sophia Areias ’14 – Volunteer Coordinator.

Congratulations to all!

Thank you for your many contributions to public interest and social justice at Santa Clara Law…Let’s stay connected!

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Press for Justice – Winter 2013

Dear friends of the Center,
We hope your new year is off to a wonderful start; this has certainly been a productive academic year thus far. We are fortunate to have continued support of alumni volunteer Laura Best and our newest CSJ team members undergraduate student workers Patty Medina and Jared O’Rourke  and graduate fellow Elizabeth Hollis. Special thanks to Jared for his work on this e-newsletter.  Following is a recap of the Center’s fall activities and information about upcoming spring events – please join us!

Stephanie Wildman, Margalynne Armstrong,  Deborah Moss-West, and Sandra Vega
Center for Social Justice and Public Service

center for social justice and public interest staff

Let’s stay connected – sign up for the Center email list and like us on facebook.

NEWS, PROJECT UPDATES and UPCOMING EVENTS

PUBLIC INTEREST AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW BOARD INVITATION and APPLICATIONS FOR 2013 SUMMER GRANTS

The Public Interest and Social Justice Law Board (“Law Board”) seeks alumni to join the Law Board to help raise money to fund student summer work for social justice and other public interest work. Law Board funding priorities include: law student summer grants; income supplement grants for alumni; and scholarships for current students.

For summer 2012, the Law Board funded 26 law  student summer grants, representing over 10,000 hours of free legal service for  low-income communities and families. The Law Board member fundraising  commitment is modest and the impact of the work is priceless. The Board meets  four times per year. Contact Deborah  Moss-West or Stephanie Wildman to learn more about the Law Board and how you can support law students, alumni,  and others who share a commitment to marginalized, subordinated, or  underrepresented clients and causes. Read  more…

We are currently raising funds for law students applying for 2013 summer grants. Click the link below for more information and application due dates. With support from the Law School community and generous donors, we will continue to provide law student summer grants. We are proud that many careers began with the support of a summer grant; please help keep the program strong!

Support the Center
Information for 2013 Summer Grant Applicants

PRO BONO PLACEMENT PROJECT

The Pro Bono Placement Project works to identify organizations that have a need for volunteers during the  academic year. The Project allows students to serve community legal needs while  also creating vital networking opportunities and invaluable skills training. In  fall 2012, over 30 students were placed in pro bono positions at ten  organizations. We are thrilled about the growing interest in this project. If your  legal services organization needs volunteers, please contact Deborah Moss-West, dmosswest@scu.edu.

MARSHALL-BRENNAN CONSTITUTIONAL LITERACY PROJECT

The Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project provides current law students the opportunity to teach about the  Constitution and moot court skills in local high schools. Fall 2012 participating high schools: Andrew Hill, Gunderson and Yerba  Buena High Schools. Each semester ends with a Moot Court competition. If you  would like to be a part of the Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project,  as a student or alumni volunteer, please contact Deborah Moss-West, dmosswest@scu.edu.

CONSTITUTION DAY FOR YOUTH

In partnership with the Dean’s Office, Law Diversity Programs, and the Marshall-Brennan Project, each fall we host Constitution Day for Youth on Santa Clara’s Campus. On September 16, 2012, students from 4 local high schools spent all day learning about the US Constitution, rights and responsibilities in a fun, interactive, environment. While on campus, the students participated in mock law classes, learned about the college admissions process, engaged in debates and interacted with faculty, staff, undergraduate/ law students, and alumni. A special thank you to Mike Chavez ’08 for assistance coordinating the event and to speakers Alvaro Almanza ’07 and Brandon Cabrera ’11. “The goal of Santa Clara Law Constitution Day for Youth is to reach out to young people in high school to get them thinking about their future and interest them in law school,” said Jeanette Leach, Assistant Dean of Diversity Programs.

UPCOMING SPRING EVENTS

These  events are open to both students and the general public, allowing the entire  SCU community to take advantage of this unique opportunity. For additional information about events  listed, contact Sandra Vega svega@scu.edu.

SPRING 2013 SOCIAL JUSTICE DIVERSITY LECTURE The Center for  Social Justice and Public Service offers at least two major lectures each year  featuring Critical Race theorists.

Thursday, March  21, 2013, at 4:00 p.m.
Arts & Sciences Building, Wiegand Room, followed by Wine and Cheese  Reception
Beverly I. Moran (Vanderbilt University Law School)
“Excellence and Diversity”
1  hour MCLE credit

SPRING 2013 VISITING PRACTITIONER The visiting practitioner program brings prominent attorneys to  campus to counsel students on pursuing public interest and social justice  careers and to share their work.

Dori Rose IndaThursday, January 31, 2013, Noon in Bannan 127 
Dori Rose Inda (Watsonville Law Center)
“Turning Vision into Mission as an  Accidental Leader”

SPRING 2013 SOCIAL JUSTICE WORKSHOP: PUBLIC SERVICE  AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW PRACTICE– led by Professor Margaret Russell

Thursday, January 31,  2013, Noon in Bannan 127
Dori Rose Inda
(Watsonville Law Center)
“Turning  Vision into Mission as an Accidental Leader”

Susan Mizner Thursday, February 14, 2013, Noon in Bannan 127
Susan Mizner
(American Civil Liberties Union Disability Rights Project)
“A  Valentine to the ADA: Why I Love Disability Rights Law and You Should, Too”

 

 

Mchael AdamsThursday, February 21, 2013, Noon in Bannan 127
Michael Adams
(SAGE USA, Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders)
“Aging through an LGBT Lens: A Social Justice Perspective”

 

Margaret A. BurnhamThursday, March  14, 2013, Noon in Bannan 127
Margaret A. Burnham
(Northeastern University School of Law)
“Civil Rights and Restorative Justice: Why the Past Still Matters”

 

Lia EppersonThursday, March  28, 2013, Noon in Bannan 127
Lia Epperson
(Washington College of Law, American University)
“Litigating and Legislating Inclusion in Public Education”

 

Anthony D. RomeroThursday, April  18, 2013, Noon in Bannan 127
Anthony D. Romero
(National American Civil Liberties Union)
“Leading the  Charge: Protecting and Expanding Constitutional Rights in the Face of Popular Opposition”

 

FALL 2012 HIGHLIGHTS

BENEFIT FOR JUSTICE

The annual Benefit for Justice brings together the legal community and Santa Clara Law for a night of socializing and fundraising to support the public interest and social justice summer work of law students.

This  year’s Benefit, held on Friday, September 28, 2012, was attended by a wonderful  mix of law students, professors, alumni, friends, families, and attorneys from  the community. Every year, we are grateful for the generous support from the community;  this year was no different. The event includes a “lively” live auction, silent  auction, mixing, mingling, good food, and recognition of attorneys and law  students committed to public interest. This year’s auction items were some of  the finest yet, including a week’s stay at a Tahoe resort, Bar preparation  materials/courses, gift certificates, and many creative faculty donations. Hope  to see you again next year! And if you missed out this year, come next fall and  see what all the fuss is about!

Social  Justice Service Awards were awarded to two attorneys and two law  students who have significantly contributed to the social justice and public  interest community through their work or volunteer efforts.

Stephen P. Berzon
Altshuler Berzon LLP

David W. Epps
Santa Clara County Alternate Defender Office

Jessica C. Chan ’13

Isabella Shin ’13

A special thank you to the law student Benefit Committee: Alexander Cunny ’13 – Benefit Chair, Michelle McCully ’14 – Event Coordinator, and Sophia Areias ’14 – Volunteer Coordinator.

Funds  raised from the Benefit give students the chance to take part in unpaid social  justice and public interest summer positions – positions that can launch a public  interest career.

Fall 2012 Workshop: Climate Change Law – led by Professor Ken Manaster and Professor Tseming Yang

This course introduced students to the legal tools and policy measures used to respond to the world’s most pressing and prominent international environmental problem-global climate change. Students explored evaluative frameworks and the latest developments in the U.S. and internationally, including the status of the international climate negotiations and new treaty commitments, the pervasive social justice dialogue among governments and with civil society and the business sector, and the implications for the people of the developing and developed world.

The course emphasized the practical aspects of implementing measures, including new and pending federal and state regulations, the operation of market mechanisms such as carbon markets, and the increasing need to focus on climate adaptation.

The seminar featured several prominent guest lecturers who are experts in climate change law. More on the Social Justice Workshops.

Speakers List:

Emilie  Mazzacurati (Head of Carbon Analysis, Global Market at Thomson Reuters) – Carbon  Markets and Finance
Marne S. Sussman (Pillsbury  Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP) –Local Laws and Climate Change
Alex Jackson (Natural  Resources Defense Council, San Francisco) – California Climate  Regulation
Avi Samuel Garbow (Deputy General Counsel, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) – EPA  Climate-related Regulations
Catherine  Sandoval (California Public Utilities Commission) – California  Energy Policy
David G. Victor (Professor,  UCSD) – Future Prospects of the Climate  Treaties
Peter Wyckoff (Former EPA  official) – Federal Climate Regulation
John Cruden (President of  the Environmental Law Institute in Washington D.C.) – Federal Climate Regulation

In  Fall 2012, the Center hosted Maeve Elise Brown and Jerry Kang.

Visiting Practitioner – Maeve Elise Brown
The Future of Homeownership – A Social Justice Perspective

Maeve Elise BrownMaeve  Elise Brown delivered the fall 2012 visiting practitioner lecture, titled “The  Future of Homeownership – A Social Justice Perspective.” Ms. Brown began her  lecture by giving a brief overview of her practice and the predatory mortgage  environment that exists today. She then described the types of injustice that  she has dealt with out in the world of predatory mortgage. Ms. Brown also  walked through the process of starting a nonprofit law firm, and addressed many  of the challenges she faced. Towards the end of her lecture, she opened up the  floor to address the individual concerns of the students, faculty, and others  in attendance.  By the end of her  lecture, Ms. Brown had inspired us all by providing a real life example of how  one can “do good” in today’s world. View Ms. Brown’s talk.

Diversity Lecture – Professor Jerry Kang (UCLA School of Law)
Thinking Race: Implicit Bias and Stereotype Threat

Jerry KangJerry  Kang (University of California, Los Angeles) gave the Fall Diversity Lecture,  titled “Thinking Race: Implicit Bias and Stereotype Threat.” Professor Kang discussed  concepts like the “tournament of merit,” “implicit bias,” and “the stereotype  threat and implications of the law.” Professor Kang explained  that the only way to eliminate bias is to  deconstruct the manner in which individuals attach meanings to entities they  encounter in their everyday experiences. Ultimately, by targeting bias,  individuals can identify the mapping mechanisms that reinforce negative  associations with people of different ethnic backgrounds. In order to be  unbiased and to perpetuate the notion of equality for all, it is vital that  other factors such as competence and content of character are taken into  account. For example, when litigating a case in court, attitudes and behavior can  diminish the dignity and value of the person being accused when not judged solely  on the alleged crime, but also on the color of their skin. Therefore, the law  must be held accountable in order to protect the rights of its citizens. If the  law fails to recognize racial bias, then “it becomes a moral failure because it  is does nothing to alter the perceptions of stereotypes which continue to exist  in society.” (Kang). View Prof. Kang’s lecture

Thank you for your many contributions to public interest and  social justice at Santa Clara Law!

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Press for Justice – Winter 2012

GroupDear friends of the CSJ,

It is hard to believe we are already well into 2012; this has been a busy academic year. Following is a recap of the CSJ’s fall activities and information about upcoming spring events. This academic year we welcomed alumni volunteer Laura Best, graduate fellows Aaron Hirsh and Monica Macaluso, and undergraduate student worker Lindsay Pineda to the CSJ team. Special thanks to Lindsay for her work on this e-newsletter.

Stephanie Wildman, Margalynne Armstrong,
Deborah Moss-West, and Sandra Vega

Center For Social Justice and Public Service

NEWS AND UPCOMING EVENTS

APPLICATIONS FOR 2012 SUMMER GRANTS and DONATION OPPORTUNITY
Volunteering is an integral part of the Center for Social Justice and Public Service. One of the main objectives of the Center for Social Justice is to provide funding for modest stipends for students who pursue summer public interest positions as volunteers. Last summer Santa Clara provided over $100,000 to more than 20 students, representing over 11,000 hours of free legal services in the community.

We are currently raising funds for law students applying for 2012 summer grants, including the Public Interest and Social Justice Law Board, Father Goda and Dean Mary Emery Summer Grants, as well as the LGBT Legal Issues. Click the link below for more information and application due dates. With the Benefit for Justice and the help from our generous donors, we hope to continue to provide law student summer grants that enable them to volunteer for public interest and social justice legal service organizations. We are proud to know that many of your careers began with the support of a Summer Grant from the Center for Social Justice; help us keep the program strong!

Support the Center

Information for 2012 Summer Grant Applicants

PRO BONO PLACEMENT PROJECT
In 2010 the Center for Social Justice and Public Service partnered with Public Interest Law Career Services (PILCS) to create the Pro Bono Placement Project. The Project is going strong.

The Project works to identify organizations that have a need for volunteers during the academic year. In fall 2011, 21 students were placed in Pro Bono positions. The Project allows students to serve community legal needs while also creating vital networking opportunities and on-the-job training that will be invaluable for their careers.

Participating organizations have included: Bay Area Legal Aid, Community Legal Services of East Palo Alto, Law Foundation of Silicon Valley, Senior Adults Legal Assistance, Silicon Valley Chapter of Americans for Safe Access, Pro Bono Project, Catholic Charities, and local courts, to name a few.

Sharon Bashan“At a time when legal services organizations and the courts are chronically underfunded, the Pro Bono Placement Project is a valuable initiative to help provide access to justice to low-income and other vulnerable communities locally. Our organizations are better off because we can work with the law students to serve more low-income clients. The law students are better off because they leave our organizations with the critical client skills and analytical tools needed to succeed as future lawyers. And the clients are better off because someone cared to help them in a desperate time of need.”

– Sharon Bashan ’05, Pro Bono Project of Silicon Valley

We are thrilled about the growing interest in this project. If you are a practitioner at a legal services organization that needs volunteers, please contact Deborah Moss-West at the Center for Social Justice and Public Service at dmosswest@scu.edu.

UPCOMING SPRING EVENTS

These events are open to both students and the general public, allowing the entire SCU community to take advantage of this unique opportunity.

Spring 2012 Social Justice Diversity Lecture
Thursday, March 22, 2012, at 4:00 p.m.
Nobili Hall, followed by Wine and Cheese Reception
Margaret Chon (Seattle University School of Law) Intellectual Property: What Do Diversity and Social Justice Have to Do with It?
1 hour MCLE credit

Margaret ChonMargaret Chon is the Donald & Lynda Horowitz Professor for the Pursuit of Justice at Seattle University School of Law. In 2011–12, she will be a Global Emile Noël Research Fellow at the Jean Monnet Center for International and Regional Economic Law and Justice at New York University Law School, where she will explore dimensions of knowledge governance through international intellectual property law. Her current scholarship focuses on the relation of knowledge goods to the production of other global public goods necessary for human development and flourishing. A graduate of the University of Michigan Law School, she is also an alumna of the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Cornell University College of Arts and Science.

Spring 2012 Social Justice Workshop: The Death Penalty: Race, Poverty, and Disadvantage – led by Professor Ellen Kreitzberg
Thursday, March 29, 2012, Noon in Bannan 127
Angela J. Davis (American University Washington College of Law)

Prosecutorial Discretion: The Power to Choose Death

Angela J. Davis is a professor of law at the American University Washington College of Law, where she teaches in the area of criminal law. She is the author of numerous books and articles on racism in the criminal justice arena, prosecutorial discretion and criminal justice, including Arbitrary Justice: The Power of the American Prosecutor (Oxford University Press, 2007), and co-editor of Trial Stories (with Professor Michael E. Tigar, Foundation Press, 2007). In 2002, Davis received the American University Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching, and in 2009 the American University Faculty Award for Outstanding Scholarship. She was awarded a Soros Senior Justice Fellowship in 2004.

Davis is a graduate of Howard University and Harvard Law School. She serves on the board of trustees of the Southern Center for Human Rights, the Sentencing Project, and the Peter M. Cicchino Social Justice Foundation. From 1991 to 1994, she was the director of the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia. Davis is a former law clerk of the Honorable Theodore R. Newman of the D.C. Court of Appeals.

2012 CENTER FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE AND PUBLIC SERVICE CONFERENCE: RACE, SEXUALITY, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

Friday, April 13, 2012, 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Bannan Hall, Santa Clara University
7 hours of MCLE credit are available

This three-part conference, to be held at Santa Clara Law School on April 13, 2012, the Ohio State University Moritz College of Law in fall 2012, and University of Maryland School of Law in spring 2013, will explore questions about the relation between race and sexuality. These conversations seek to develop new knowledge and fresh scholarship through which deeper understanding of others, as well as new pathways for coalition and ourselves may emerge. While significantly an academic project, though not exclusively a project in law, the conferences aspire to generate concrete interventions for progressives to explore directions in politics, society, and law toward a more just future in both race and sexual equality.

Confirmed speakers:

  • Patricia A. Cain (Santa Clara University School of Law)
  • Adam R. Chang (law student at University of Hawai`i and LGBT activist)
  • Martha Ertman (University of Maryland Law School)
  • Angela P. Harris (UC Davis School of Law)
  • Shannon Price Minter (National Center for Lesbian Rights)
  • Mignon R. Moore (UCLA Department of Sociology)
  • john a. powell (Moritz School of Law, Ohio State University)
  • Russell K. Robinson (UC Berkeley School of Law)
  • Margaret Russell (Santa Clara University School of Law)
  • Dean Spade (Seattle University School of Law)
  • Marc Spindelman (Michael E. Moritz College of Law)
  • Gerald Torres (University of Texas School of Law)
  • Francisco Valdes (University of Miami)

For more information, contact the Center for Social Justice and Public Service at socialjustice@scu.edu or 408.551.1720.

FALL 2011 HIGHLIGHTS

BENEFIT FOR JUSTICE

The annual Benefit for Justice brings together the legal community and Santa Clara Law for a night of socializing and fundraising to support the public interest and social justice summer work of law students.

This year’s Benefit, on Friday, September 23, 2011 on the Santa Clara University campus, had a wonderful turnout of law students, professors, alumni, friends, families, and attorneys from the community. The Benefit was successful in large part due to the support and generous donations from the law faculty and staff, law alumni, the University, local merchants, and Bay Area sports teams. Donations were auctioned to the highest bidders in the live and silent auctions. The auction included superb items such as a trip to Lake Tahoe, game tickets to the San Jose Sharks and Oakland A’s, autographed San Francisco Giants and San Francisco 49ers memorabilia, gift certificates to restaurants and spas, and some very unique faculty donations! This year’s highest selling item was the annual “Karaoke and Dinner Party.” This “party of the year” was hosted at Dean Cynthia Mertens’ home with the karaoke provided by Federal Judge Jim Ware! The winning bidders and some lucky friends got the chance to sing their favorite songs with law professors, Dean Polden, and Judge Ware.

Benefit Chair Katey White, 3L, commented: “Santa Clara Law’s commitment to social justice work is inspiring. The Benefit for Justice helps raise money to make summer grants possible for law students who do countless hours of pro bono work. This legal work impacts the lives of so many deserving people. It was an honor to be a part of this great event.”

Social Justice Service Awards were given to three attorneys and one law student who have significantly contributed to the social justice and public interest community through their work or volunteer efforts.

Denise Abrams
Kazan, McClain, Lyons, Greenwood & Harley, PLC

Cherri N. Allison ’83
Alameda County Family Justice Center

Amanda Hawes
Partner, Alexander Hawes, LLP

Martin Kopp ’12

Funds raised from the Benefit give students the chance to take part in unpaid social justice and public interest positions over the summer – positions that can perhaps launch their public interest careers. We are thankful for everyone that provides monetary gifts and auction items to support this great cause each year.

FALL 2011 SOCIAL JUSTICE WORKSHOP – Suing Governments: Federal, State and Foreign

Professor David Sloss led the Fall 2011 Social Justice Workshop on Suing Governments: Federal, State and Foreign. This workshop discusses suits by private plaintiffs against government agencies and/or officers. Lawsuits of this type are an essential mechanism for holding governments accountable and promoting the rule of law. This class discussed some of the obstacles that plaintiffs face when they pursue cases against government defendants and ways in which lawyers overcome these obstacles. The course was divided into three parts: suits against state and local government defendants; suits against federal government defendants; and suits against foreign government defendants.

The seminar featured several prominent guest lecturers who are experts in this area of law. More on the Social Justice Workshops.

Speakers List:

  • Don Specter (Prison Law Office) – Litigating Prisoners’ Rights
  • Steven Watt (American Civil Liberties Union, Human Rights Program) – Extraordinary Renditions
  • Shayana Kadidal (Center for Constitutional Rights – Guantanamo Litigation
  • Natasha Fain (Center for Justice and Accountability) – Litigating Claims under the Alien Tort Statute
  • Professor Beth Stephens (Rutgers School of Law) – Foreign Sovereign Immunity

VISITING PROFESSIONALS

In Fall 2011, the Center hosted Terry Rogers and Gerald Torres.

Terry RogersVisiting Practitioner – Terry Rogers
From Legal Services to International Development of the Rule of Law: A Perspective on Working for Social Justice
Ms. Rogersprovided a passionate presentation on her current work and how she came to do it. She began by inviting men and women to try on a burqa to illustrate the physical experience of Afghanistan women who wear this head/body covering. Ms. Rogers described how – after 17 years as a U.S. legal aid attorney – she started working on the international rule of law, how the work has affected her, and her ideas about how one can make a contribution to the world. View Ms. Rogers talk.

Gerald TorresDiversity Lecture – Professor Gerald Torres, (University of Texas School of Law)
Legalities: The Experience of Justice and Plural Legal Systems
Professor Torres began with a moving tribute to the late Professor Derrick Bell, explaining how Bell’s influence shaped Torres’ own decisions as a lawyer. He spoke about how the law can affect people and offered an illustration of how theoretically neutral laws were used to segregate and limit African Americans. View Professor Torres’ Lecture.

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Press for Justice – Summer 2011

Dear friends of the Center,

It’s hard to believe how fast the spring semester went by! We hope your summer is off to a great start. We wanted to let you know about the upcoming fall events and recap the Center’s spring activities. Please let us know how you would like to be involved with public interest and social justice programs at Santa Clara Law. We welcome you to join us at Center events. Special thanks to Nina Gurikar, our Graduate Fellow, for her work on this e-newsletter.

Stephanie Wildman, Margalynne Armstrong,
Deborah Moss-West, and Sandra Vega

Center For Social Justice and Public Service

Center staff

NEWS AND UPCOMING EVENTS

PRO BONO PLACEMENT PROJECT
Last fall, the Center for Social Justice and Public Service joined with Public Interest Law Career Services (PILCS) to create the Pro Bono Placement Project!

This innovative Project identifies non-profit legal services organizations that have a need for volunteers during the academic year. The Project gives students the opportunity to gain hands-on skills while serving community legal needs; an invaluable experience for their careers.

In Spring 2011, the Center and PILCS organized over 20 student volunteer placements at four legal services organizations: Bay Area Legal Aid, Community Legal Services of East Palo Alto, Law Foundation of Silicon Valley, and Senior Adults Legal Assistance.

Jessica Chan, a 1L, volunteered at Community Legal Services of East Palo Alto during Spring 2011:

“Like many others, I came to law school passionately wanting to represent marginalized communities and individuals. In my first semester, I became disheartened by constant reminders of my potential inability to pay off amassing loans with a public interest job and by the apparent disconnect between my coursework and the pursuit of social justice.

Volunteering as an Immigration Intern at Community Legal Services of East Palo Alto (CLSEPA) my second semester helped quell these doubts by allowing me to work with an amazing SCU Law alum who successfully pursued a career in public interest, and by allowing me to use my legal education to help real clients. It was the perfect start to my career in immigration and refugee law, and I am so grateful to CLESPA and the Pro Bono Placement Project for providing me with the opportunity.”

-Jessica Chan, 1L, Community Legal Services of East Palo Alto

We are excited about the past and future interest in the Pro Bono Placement Project, and are looking forward to its expansion!

If you are a student who would like to get involved with the Pro Bono Placement Project in Fall 2011, or a practitioner at a legal services organization that needs volunteers, please contact Deborah Moss-West at the Center for Social Justice and Public Service

NEW COURSE FOR SPRING 2012! MARSHALL-BRENNAN LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT COURSE AND CONSTITUTIONAL LITERACY PROJECT!
This exciting new course allows second and third year law student Fellows to teach constitutional rights and coach high school students in a moot court competition! The vision of the program is to empower high school students to be responsible community members and lifelong participants in the democratic process. Students learn about their constitutional rights and responsibilities through the Supreme Court cases that affect youth most directly.

The Marshall-Brennan Leadership Development Course and Constitutional Literacy Project is a multifaceted program endorsed by the California State Bar built around law students teaching the Constitution and moot court skills in local underserved high schools. The components of the program include:.

  • A high school constitutional literacy course taught by law students,
  • A seminar for the law students teaching in the program, and
  • Pipeline activities for high school students with community service opportunities for law school students (and possibly SCU undergrads).

If you would like to support the Marshall-Brennan Leadership Development Course and Constitutional Literacy Project pilot or if you have any questions, please contact Deborah Moss-West

Info sessions for 2Ls and 3Ls interested in becoming Fellows will be held in Bannan during the Fall 2011 semester.

SAVE THE DATE! BENEFIT FOR JUSTICE IS ON SEPTEMBER 23, 2011!
The Benefit for Justice is an annual event that brings together the local legal community and Santa Clara Law for a night of socializing and fundraising.

Since 1989, Santa Clara Law, through the Public Interest and Social Justice Law Board (Law Board), has provided financial assistance to students working in unpaid summer internships in social justice and public interest fields. Well-trained law student interns expand legal resources and increase access to justice in low-income communities. Many of the organizations serving these communities have very little financial resources, if any, to pay students. The Law Board fills that financial gap by offering summer grants to students who work in public interest and social justice organizations. In the past two years alone, 33 students received financial support from the Law Board. This represents over 13,000 hours of free legal service for low-income communities and families.

The funds raised from the Benefit makes it possible for students to take on unpaid social justice and public interest positions in communities that need legal services – positions that often launch their public interest careers.

To support or learn more about the Benefit for Justice, visit law.scu.edu/socialjustice/benefit-for-justice.cfm

2011 Benefit Committee:
Katharine White, 3L – Benefit Chair, kwhite@scu.edu
Alexander Cunny, 2L – Event Coordinator

SPRING 2011 HIGHLIGHTS

2011 SOCIAL JUSTICE LEADERSHIP SYMPOSIUM
On April 15, 2011, the Center for Social Justice and Public Service hosted “Cultivating Social Justice Leadership: An Intergenerational Conversation Examining the Social Justice Sector Leadership Challenge” (MCLE credit was offered to attendees). The symposium gathered several generations of social justice leaders to consider questions related to the social justice sector leadership challenge and to inform and inspire the leaders of tomorrow.

Dean Donald Polden opened the symposium, followed by an intergenerational panel discussion featuring Jennifer Lind Tse (Southern Poverty Law Center), Sarah Mercer (Santa Clara Law), Paula Nailon (University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law), Joan Messing Graff (Legal Aid Society, Employment Law Center) and moderator Marina Hsieh (Santa Clara Law). Speakers prompted a thought-provoking discussion on the complexities of what it means to be a social justice leader. Attendees were able to further explore the topic in small group discussions sessions following the panel. Small group discussion leaders included the panelists as well as Margalynne Armstrong, Julia Yaffee, Edison Jensen ’89, and law students Aroma Sharma, Sarah Mercer, Antonio Raymo, and Jennifer McAllister. Michael Engh, S.J., President, Santa Clara University, introduced The Honorable Sidney Espinosa, Mayor of Palo Alto, who delivered the keynote on leadership and technology. Mayor Espinosa highlighted the three qualities of successful leaders: a true capability to foster dialogues, a capacity to appreciate diverse opinions, and the importance of mentorship. Mr. Espinosa also commented on how emerging technology can impact social movements by validating user participation. He challenged each of us to use technology to advance causes we believe in.

Learn more and watch the podcast…

Symposium group

Dean Donald Polden with symposium panelist and small group discussion leaders

Father Engh and Sidney Espinosa

Michael Engh S.J., President of Santa Clara University with keynote
speaker the Honorable Sidney Espinosa, Mayor of Palo Alto

RECAP: EL SALVADOR TRIP, JANUARY 1-8, 2011
Professor Cynthia Mertens led another group of 18 law students and 2 alumni on an immersion trip to El Salvador in January 2011, an experience that changed the lives of the participants. Students who have gone on previous immersion trips describe it as “one of the most memorable things they did in law school.”

“A one week immersion trip to El Salvador doesn’t seem like it would be more than dipping your toe in the water… except those expectations don’t take into account the generosity of the Salvadoran people. The people we met and their willingness to lay themselves and their lives bare for us to view and feel was a truly amazing experience. More than once speakers on the trip made me laugh when all I could think of was crying, where I felt like my heart wouldn’t be able to hold up in the face of the horrors they had encountered at the hands of other human beings, and then the unadulterated warmth and hope that shone through when they spoke of their efforts and hopes for the future. It was immensely inspirational to meet so many people who have and are making such a strong effort to, as Gandhi once said, be the change they want to see in the world.”

-Navdeep Taunk, 2L

SPRING 2011 SOCIAL JUSTICE WORKSHOP: CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

Professor Pratheepan Gulasekaram led the Spring 2011 Social Justice Workshop on Citizenship and Immigration Law. This unique workshop explored select topics on citizenship and immigration law, and challenged students to critically examine the fundamental moral, theoretical, doctrinal, and policy questions in the field.

Discussions and readings covered the way nations distribute citizenship, what rights or privileges should be conditioned on citizenship, undocumented migration, and proposals for immigration reform, including guest worker programs. The workshop featured several public lectures from prominent and groundbreaking scholars and practitioners, including impact litigators, policy experts, and innovative empirical researchers. This workshop provided an opportunity for students to engage in an important topic as well as connect with the greater SCU community.
More on the Social Justice Workshops…

Featured Speakers:

  • Karthick Ramakrishnan (Associate Professor of Political Science, U.C. Riverside) “Going Local: The New Politics of Immigration in the United States”
  • Hiroshi Motomura (UCLA School of Law)
    “Are Unauthorized Migrants “Americans in Waiting?”
  • Ahilan Arulanantham (Director of Immigrants’ Rights and National Security,
    ACLU of Southern California)
    “Emerging Issues in Immigration Detention”
  • Juliet Stumpf (Lewis & Clark Law School)
    “Governing Work Through Immigration Law”
  • Stephen Lee (UCI Law School)
    “Regulatory Challenges of Unauthorized Migration”
  • Jayashri Srikantiah (Stanford Law School)
    “Stipulated Removals and Immigration Enforcement”

VISITING PRACTITIONER

Sonia MercadoThis Spring, the Center hosted Sonia Mercado of Sonia Mercado & Associates. In February, she lectured on “Actualizing Your Passion for Social Justice Through the Private Practice of Human Rights Law.” Ms. Mercado highlighted the mechanics of how to become a solo practitioner in her lecture. She stressed the importance of overcoming the fear of failure, knowing one’s vision, and knowing one’s colleagues. She also stressed how important it is to recognize that the license to practice law will give a lawyer the opportunity to work where his or her passion lies. Ms. Mercado pointed out that building relationships in the legal community, finding sources of financial support, consulting with experts, and believing the client are all very important skills for solo practitioners. Finally, Ms. Mercado emphasized that the most important factor for solo practitioners is to believe in and trust themselves.

Read Ms. Mercado’s bio…

SPRING 2011 SOCIAL JUSTICE DIVERSITY LECTURE
Angela RileyThis Spring, Angela Riley lectured on “The Future of Indigenous Peoples.” Professor Riley’s lecture on the cultural property interest in indigenous peoples focused on the definition of cultural property in general, and distinguished indigenous peoples’ cultural property, highlighting issues of concern. She gave concrete examples of both tangible cultural property, which is a tangible object with great cultural meaning (such as the Eiffel Tower or Native American land that is now owned by the U.S. Federal government) as well as intangible cultural property (such as trademarks). Prof. Riley challenged the audience to consider the social justice and human rights components of property; the connection between cultural property and place; and the how intellectual property rights are connected to, and define future generations.

Read Ms. Riley’s bio…

PUBLIC INTEREST AND SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW CELEBRATION AND GRADUATION
On May 19, 2011, a Celebration and Graduation Ceremony was held to honor those who work in public interest and social justice law, as well as to reflect on the accomplishments of the past year. The ceremony recognized 38 graduating Public Interest and Social Justice Law Scholars, 19 Public Interest and Social Justice Law Board and Father Paul Goda Summer Grant Recipients, 79 Pro Bono Recognition Award Recipients, as well as 4 Justice John Paul Stevens Public Interest Fellowship Honorees. In addition, the ceremony honored the LGBT Summer Grant Recipient, the Santa Cruz County Social Justice Grant, the Harry and Jean Gluck Social Justice Law Fellowship Recipient, the Public Interest Law Career Services Student Coordinator Recognition Award, and the Herman Wildman Social Justice Law Writing Award.

The Honorable Martin J. Jenkins, California Court of Appeal, First Appellate District, delivered the Keynote Address. Also, Kellin Dune received the 2011 Pro Bono Student of the Year award, and Traci Lee received the 2011 Graduate Pro Bono Student of the Year Award.

Professor Nancy Wright received the 2011 Public Interest and Social Justice Recognition Award and Professor Michelle Oberman received the Public Interest and Social Justice Achievement Award.

Congratulations to everyone!

Wildman and Jenkins

Stephanie Wildman and Honorable Martin J. Jenkins, Social Justice Graduation

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

Ben GallowayThe Public Interest and Social Justice Law Alumni Leadership Council continues to fulfill its mission of supporting and strengthening the work of the Center for Social Justice and Public Service. In addition to attending events such as the Benefit for Justice and the Social Justice Leadership Symposium, the council members have continued to open their doors and provide guidance to SCU students and alumni. More info on the Council…

The Center would like to especially highlight the work of Ben Galloway, Assistant Federal Defender in the Eastern District of California in Sacramento.

Mr. Galloway received his J.D. from Santa Clara in 2001, where he received his Public Interest Certificate, was a Justice John Paul Stevens Fellow and a B.T. Collins Public Service Scholar. Mr. Galloway received his B.A. in History from U.C. Berkeley in 1997. Mr. Galloway has been a Deputy Federal Defender in Santa Clara and Sacramento counties, and has worked in private practice with a San Francisco firm. In 2007, he joined the Federal Defender’s Office for the Eastern District of California as a supervisor of the misdemeanor unit. Mr. Galloway now handles a wide arrow of felony cases in the Federal Defender’s trial unit.

Mr. Galloway credits Santa Clara Law public interest and social justice faculty for his decision to become a federal defender. “I chose SCU Law because I wanted to learn how to stand up for society’s less fortunate. After ten years in the trenches, I couldn’t be happier with that decision. SCU’s public interest and social justice faculty inspired me in classrooms and clinics, and they supported me in the transition from student to advocate. These professors don’t just talk about the greater good, they and their students work to make a huge difference for people in need. I think there’s no better way to teach.”

We applaud Mr. Galloway for his impressive accomplishments in social justice and thank him for his continued involvement with the Center for Social Justice.

2011 HERMAN WILDMAN SOCIAL JUSTICE LAW WRITING AWARD RECIPIENT

Jennifer McAllister2011 Recipient Jennifer McAllister: “‘We’re Not Taking New Patients Right Now’: Lack of Access to Health Care for Transgender Patients as a Public Health Crisis”

This award honors the memory of Herman Wildman, 1912-2002, who practiced law in New York and California. The Herman Wildman Social Justice Law Writing Award recognizes the best student essay on a public interest and social justice law topic.

View previous recipients…

Center for Social Justice and Public Service
Santa Clara Law
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, California 95053

Phone: (408) 551-1720 | Fax: (408) 554-5073

Center Website
socialjustice@scu.edu

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Press for Justice – Winter 2011

Dear friends of the CSJ,

Hard to believe we are over a month into 2011! We hope you are all thriving. We wanted to recap the Center’s fall activities and let you know about upcoming spring events. Special thanks to Shadie Parivar, our Graduate Fellow, for her work on this e-newsletter.

Congratulations to River Abeje for winning the “name the newsletter” contest. Here is your debut issue under the new title: Press for Justice.

Stephanie Wildman, Margalynne Armstrong,
Deborah Moss-West, and Sandra Vega

Center For Social Justice and Public Service

News and Upcoming Events

APPLICATIONS FOR 2011 SUMMER GRANTS
One of the main objectives of the Center for Social Justice is to provide funding for students who pursue summer public interest positions as volunteers. With the help of the Santa Clara Jesuit Community, in 2010 the Law Board funded over $54,000 in summer grants to students volunteering with public interest and social justice legal organizations.

We are currently raising funds to support students who apply for the various grants. The Justice John Paul Stevens Public Interest Fellowship applications for 2011 are due on February 14, 2011. The Public Interest and Social Justice Summer Grant applications and the LGBT Legal Issues Summer Grant applications for 2011are due at noon on March 15, 2011. This year’s Benefit for Justice was a great start to building up the funding necessary, but we still need the support of our generous community to keep this program going. We are proud to know that many of your careers began with the support of a Summer Grant from the Center for Social Justice, and with your help we hope to continue providing public interest opportunities to our students through this wonderful program.

Support the Center

Information for 2011 Summer Grant Applicants

PRO BONO PLACEMENT PROJECT
We are excited to announce a new project that was launched with great success in Fall 2010! The Center for Social Justice and Public Service has joined with the Public Interest Law Career Services (PILCS) to create the Pro Bono Placement Project.

The Pro Bono Placement Project works with students to identify organizations that have a need for volunteers during the academic year.  The Project gives students the opportunity to serve community legal needs while also being exposed to networking opportunities and on-the-job training that will be invaluable for their careers.

In Fall 2010 PILCS and CSJ organized volunteer placements at four legal services organizations. The “pilot” Project was quite successful, and for Spring 2011, 20 students are signed up to volunteer at the following organizations: Bay Area Legal Aid, Community Legal Services of East Palo Alto, Law Foundation of Silicon Valley, Senior Adults Legal Assistance, Silicon Valley Chapter of Americans for Safe Access, and Catholic Charities.

Katrina Logan, an attorney at the Community Legal Services of East Palo Alto, received four volunteers through the Center last fall. These Santa Clara students assembled and drafted documents for various immigration petitions. One of these students assembled a Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Self-Petition that was over 100 pages long. Another student read through and organized over 200 pages of court records that had to be submitted for a case.

“A couple of hours a week goes a long way when it means that a client now knows where to apply for paratransit services in their county, or when our immigration attorneys can spend 20 minutes reviewing an immigration petition instead of 2 hours assembling and organizing over 200 pages of documents.

Our Pro Bono Placement Project students have been a great asset to our agency and we look forward to receiving more student volunteers through this great program.”

-Katrina Logan, Community Legal Services of East Palo Alto

We are thrilled about the growing interest in this new project and will keep you posted on the progress!

If you are a student who would like to get involved, or a practitioner at a legal services organization that needs volunteers, please contact Deborah Moss-West at the Center for Social Justice and Public Service

SPRING 2011 SOCIAL JUSTICE LEADERSHIP SYMPOSIUM
Friday, April 15, 2011, 8:30 – 1:30
Cultivating Social Justice Leadership: An Intergenerational Conversation Examining the Social Justice Sector Leadership Challenge

This Spring, the Center invites you to attend a half-day symposium that will address the growing need for strong leaders in nonprofit organizations. This event will gather several generations of social justice leaders and innovators to consider questions related to the social justice sector leadership challenge, and to inform and inspire leaders of tomorrow.

Learn more and sign up.

Fall 2010 Highlights

RECAP OF THE BENEFIT FOR JUSTICE
Benefit for Justice 2011The Benefit for Justice is an annual event that brings together the legal community and Santa Clara Law for a night of socializing and fundraising to support the public interest and social justice summer work of law students.

The benefit was a big hit as usual, with music, hors d’oeuvres, and networking opportunities for students and practitioners alike. As they mingled, guests had the opportunity to bid on items in a silent auction. The highlight of the show, however, was a live auction, where students pooled their money and bid on the various chances to spend time with their professors outside of the classroom. Professor Bob Peterson ran the lively auction this year, and the big-ticket item was a karaoke party and dinner for 20 students with Dean Mertens, Dean Polden, and Judge Ware. The highest selling item overall was a full bar prep course at a substantial savings for the law student and as a generous contribution to the Benefit.

The money raised from the Benefit makes it possible for students to take on unpaid social justice and public interest positions over the summer – positions that often launch their public interest careers. We are thankful for all of the alumni and local businesses that continue to donate money and gifts to support this great cause each year.

This year’s Benefit was a great success. We had a record turnout, a successful and lively auction, and everyone had a good time. The Benefit for Justice celebrated the work and achievements of Edison Jensen and Patti Massey, two SCU alumni who have shown an exemplary commitment to public interest and social justice law. Sarah Mercer (3L) and Luci Buda (2L) were also honored with the 2010 Student Social Justice Service Awards.”

– Malia Vella 2011, co-director of the Benefit for Justice

To learn more about these two admirable attorneys recognized and the Benefit for Justice visit: law.scu.edu/socialjustice/benefit-for-justice.cfm

Benefit for Justice 2011 Benefit for Justice 2011

SOCIAL JUSTICE WORKSHOP – Women’s Human Rights
Beth Van Schaack This semester, Professor Beth Van Schaack led the Fall 2010 Social Justice Workshop on Women’s Human Rights.  This workshop explored, and sometimes critiqued, the way in which women’s issues have been framed by, and have supplemented, the existing formulation of international human rights norms.

The seminar encompassed several compelling topics, including: violence against women, the economic and social rights of women, and the reproductive rights of women.  Covering issues that are both perennial and pervasive, this course was a great educational resource for our students.

The seminar also featured several prominent guest lecturers who are experts in this area of law. These lectures were open to both the students and the general public, allowing the entire SCU community to take advantage of this unique opportunity. More on the Social Justice Workshops

Speakers List
Diane Amann (University of California Davis School of Law)

Women at Nuremberg Michelle Oberman (Santa Clara Law)

Abortion Laws and Women’s Lives: Exploring the Relationship Between the Uterus, the Conscience, and the State Beth Van Schaack (Santa Clara Law)

A Feminist Review of the Crime of Aggression Doris Buss (Carleton University – Ottawa, Canada)

Is Polygamy a Women’s Rights Issue? Nancy Northup (President, Center for Reproductive Rights)

Recent Transnational Law Developments on Reproductive Rights Joanna Erdman (Co-Director, International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law and Programme and Director, Health Equity and Law Clinic at the University of Toronto)

The Procedural Turn in Transnational Abortion Law

VISITING PROFESSIONALS
This Fall, the Center hosted Darren Hutchinson and Nan Aron.

Darren HutchinsonDarren Hutchinson gave the Fall 2010 Diversity Lecture on Resistance in the Afterlife of Identity. The 2008 presidential election gave rise to political rhetoric claiming and praising the purportedly “post-racial” and “post-gender” status of the United States. Speaking on this timely topic, Professor Hutchinson sought to point out the race and gender bias that is still apparent in these arguments, and made the case for race- and gender-consciousness as tools of progressive political organizing and public policy. This thought-provoking talk raised the knowledge and self-awareness of all who attended.

Professor Hutchinson came to us from American University Washington College of Law where he teaches Constitutional Law, Equitable Remedies, and seminars in Critical Race Theory and Equal Protection Theory. He has written extensively on these issues and his numerous publications have appeared in several prominent journals. Professor Hutchinson is currently completing a book for New York University Press that examines the legal significance of the relationship between racial subordination and heterosexism. Read more about Darren Hutchinson and his talk.

Nan AronNan Aron was our Fall 2010 Visiting Practitioner. In September she lectured at our Social Justice Thursday on Pursuing Justice: A Life in Public Interest Law. As one of the most prominent voices in public interest law today, Ms. Aron had invaluable knowledge to impart on the attendees about her work promoting a fair and independent judiciary, and how to strengthen the public’s influence on national policy.

Ms. Aron is the President of both the Alliance for Justice (AFJ) and its partner advocacy organization, the Alliance for Justice Action Campaign (AFJAC). She has been a leading voice in public interest law for over 30 years. Throughout the nation, she is unequivocally recognized for her vast expertise in public interest law, the federal judiciary, and citizen participation in public policy. Read more about Nan Aron and the AFJ

Alumni Spotlight

The Alumni Leadership Council continues to fulfill its mission of supporting and strengthening the work of the Center for Social Justice and Public Service. In addition to attending events such as the Benefit for Justice and the upcoming Social Justice Leadership Conference, the council members have continued to open their doors and provide guidance to SCU students and alumni. More info on the Council…

In this issue of Press for Justice, the Center would like to especially highlight the work of Stephanie Grogan, an active member of the Alumni Leadership Council and a dedicated public interest lawyer!

Ms. Grogan received her J.D. and Public Interest Certificate with an emphasis in Criminal Justice from Santa Clara Law in 2004 and her B.S. in Public Policy and Management from the University of Southern California in 2001. Ms. Grogan has been a Deputy Public Defender in Solano County since 2005 and currently serves clients charged with serious felonies.

In addition to her work as a public defender, Ms. Grogan is on the board of the Solano County Black Lawyers Association and spends her evenings coaching the mock trial team at Alhambra High School.

Ms. Grogan credits the Center for Social Justice and Public Service for helping jump start her career in public interest. “The Center is an incredible resource that many other law schools don’t offer. The financial support provided through grants and scholarships assisted me during law school and even as an alumnus through fellowships and loan repayment assistance. Additionally, you get to interact with amazing faculty and speakers through the various events put on by the Center.”

Despite having moved out of Santa Clara County, Ms. Grogan still attends many of the events sponsored by the Center and law school. This past year she attended the Public Interest Graduation, the BLSA Reunion dinner, and the Benefit for Justice.

More than anything, she values the people she met through the Center for Social Justice.

“My best friends are still fellow classmates and people who I met through the Center for Social Justice. We are all a great resource to each other.”

We commend Ms. Grogan for her incredible accomplishments in public interest law and thank her for her continued involvement with the Center for Social Justice.

And for those of you students who want to intern at the Solano County Public Defender’s Office, Ms. Grogan is now recruiting summer interns!

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Welcome to the Center for Social Justice and Public Service’s first e-newsletter!

The Center provides a locus for public interest and social justice scholarship, and service. The Center works closely with Santa Clara Law’s clinical programs and Public Interest Law Career Services to highlight important lawyering skills. The Center also emphasizes pro bono work and builds a sense of community among students, faculty, staff and alumni/ae. We are excited to bring you news and information about public interest and social justice programs at Santa Clara Law. We hope you will enjoy learning about the Center’s programs and identify ways that you can get involved.

The 2009-2010 year brought rich academic and extracurricular offerings, from the Diversity Lectures, Visiting Practitioners, and Social Justice Thursday speakers to the Women and Law Stories II Conference. Students were inspired to serve community needs for social justice while studying law. The Social Justice Workshop on Mass Media and the Internet Law and Regulation further illustrated the importance of infusing social justice principles into every type of law practice. The Center’s guest speakers include legal scholars and practitioners from throughout the country. Many of the Center’s programs are open to the greater legal community and offer MCLE credit.  We hope you will join our efforts, please contact us to let us know how you want to participate!

Center for Social Justice and Public Service Dept.

Center staff (from left): Associate Professor Margalynne Armstrong, Ivy Flores, Professor Stephanie Wildman and Deborah Moss-West

Spring 2010 Highlights

Women and the Law Stories II: Examining Women’s Roles in Law and the Legal System
This semester Santa Clara Law and the Center for Social Justice and Public Service (the Center) hosted The Power of Women’s Stories II: Examining Women’s Role in Law and the Legal System (offering MCLE credit to attendees). This conference followed to the first Women and Law Stories symposium, which was held in April 2007. Inspired by the warm reception the first conference received, Professors Stephanie Wildman (Santa Clara) and Elizabeth Schneider (Brooklyn) embarked on a soon to be published book project Women and the Law Stories. This year’s conference celebrates completion of the project (please see the book website for more information and further reading).

The conference offered a series of panel discussions including: “Women: History, Identity and Standard of Review;” “Women and Work;” and “Women: Health and Safety.” Professors and scholars from universities across the United States participated in the conference and discussed pertinent cases that have impacted women and the law. Professor Michelle Oberman used an innovate format to present the keynote address which mixed law student narrations of the young protagonists’ perspectives, highlighting the gulf between the worlds of contemporary high school students and adult participants in the criminal law system. Her address prompted a thought provoking discussion on the complexities of rape, consent and teenage sexual relations in the context of the 2003 California Supreme Court decision In re John Z.

Professor Elizabeth Schneider led a round table conversation about women in the legal profession and the academy. Professors from Cornell, UNLV, Maryland and Kansas law schools reflected on their careers and their personal struggles integrating the male-dominated legal profession in the late 1960’s. The conference concluded with a wine and cheese reception celebrating Professors Wildman’s and Schneider’s forthcoming book. Watch videocasts of Women and the Law Stories II on iTunesU.

Mass Media and Internet Law and Regulation
This semester Assistant Professor Catherine J.K. Sandoval led the Spring 2010 Social Justice Workshop on Mass Media and Internet Law and Regulation: Promoting Access and Protecting the Public Interest. This unique workshop explored the intersections of law, regulation, technology, public access and the public interest through an in-depth study of mass media and Internet law and regulation. Students had the opportunity to explore high-tech law as it relates to public interest issues.

The seminar addressed many of the core concerns that shape mass media and the Internet today. Professor Sandoval began her seminar with examining the relationship between the spectrum of technologies, government regulation and public interest. The class also explored other topics such as race and media, media’s impact on youth and families and the relationship between constitutional law and technology.

This seminar also offered a unique opportunity to bring several experts on this area of law to Santa Clara. All of the scholar’s lectures were open to the students and the SCU community. This workshop provided a chance for students to engage in an important topic as well as connect with the greater SCU community. More on the Social Justice Workshops.

Speakers list

Christine Bachen (Santa Clara University Department of Communication)
Media, Youth, and Families

Leonard Baynes (St. John’s University School of Law)
Race and the Media

Allen Hammond, IV. (Santa Clara Law)
Structural Regulation of Mass Media: Consolidation, Diversity and the Public Interest

Krista Jacobsen (Covington & Burling, LLP)
Understanding Spectrum Technologies and the Justification for its Regulation in the Public Interest

Becky Lentz, Ph.D. (McGill University)
Linguistic Engineering: The FCC’s Computer Inquiries and their Legacy for Communications and Internet Regulation

Paul Ohm (University of Colorado Law School)
Wiretapping the Internet

Lee Tien (Electronic Frontier Foundation)
The Law and Policy of Internet Privacy

The Center hosts Robert Chang and R. Samuel Paz
Robert ChangRobert Chang gave the Spring 2010 Diversity Lecture on “Ricci, Race & Affirmative Action.” Professor Chang is the founding director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality at Seattle University School of Law. He is the author of Disoriented: Asian Americans, Law, and the Nation-State (NYU Press 1999) as well as numerous articles, essays, and chapters on race and interethnic relations in the United States. In his lecture, he critiqued the Supreme Court’s decision in RICCI ET v. DESTEFANO and discussed issues of race, heroism and affirmative action. The Diversity Lecture offers one hour of MCLE credit. Please follow the iTunes link to watch the full lecture.

R. Samuel Paz

 

R. Samuel Paz spoke about careers in social justice and protecting human and civil rights as the Visiting Practitioner. Mr. Paz is a native of Los Angeles and since 1974 has practiced law for the community, specializing in civil rights litigation. Mr. Paz is also an outspoken advocate for accountability and transparency in actions stemming from police brutality and prisoner’s rights’ abuses. As a part of his visit, Mr. Paz held office hours and met with students to discuss his career and students’ interest in social justice. He offered vital guidance in mapping out one’s career in the public interest sector. To see the lecture, please follow the iTunes link for the video pod cast.

Alumni Connections

Introducing Alumni Council
The Center for Social Justice and Public Service is pleased to introduce the 2010-11 Public Interest and Social Justice Alumni Leadership Council. As law students, each of the eleven Council members participated in public interest and social justice programs. The Council is committed to keeping the Center’s programs strong by: assisting the fundraising efforts of the Center, supporting current students by serving as Alumni Ambassadors at annual public interest and social justice events, and strengthening Santa Clara Law’s tie to the public interest and social justice community.

The Center welcomed the Council back to the Santa Clara Law community on May 20, 2010, at the Public Interest & Social Justice Law Celebration and Graduation Ceremony. More info on the Council here.

Our e-Newsletter Needs a Name!
The Center for Social Justice and Public Service needs your participation!

To celebrate the first edition of our e-newsletter, we are holding a contest. Help us name this publication! Submit your name between July 9 – July 31. The winner will be announced in the next e-newsletter and rewarded for their effort! Please submit entries to socialjustice@scu.edu. We can’t wait to see the submissions!

Meet Our Involved Students

The Center’s rich academic and extracurricular offerings allow Santa Clara students to serve community needs for social justice while studying law. We also presented several students with pro bono service awards and provided many students with summer fellowships.

  • In 2010, 19 law students received summer grants, representing over 8,000 hours of free legal service for low-income communities and families.
  • 89 law students contributed 50 hours or more of pro bono service during the academic 2009-2010 year, representing over 11,000 hours of service in the community. Read about the pro-bono recognition program.
  • 24 law students were awarded Public Interest and Social Justice Law Certificates upon graduation. Santa Clara Law also offers the certificate with a special emphasis in consumer law, critical race theory, criminal justice, health law and immigration and refugee law.
  • Each year, hundreds of law students participate in the Social Justice Thursday Speakers Series, the Social Justice Workshop, public interest and social justice classes, Public Interest Law Career Services activities, and the student Public Interest and Social Justice Coalition.

2010 Herman Wildman Social Justice Law Writing Award Recipient

 

2010 Recipient Sarah Mercer: Tongue Tied: Women at the Intersection of Language Access and Reproductive Health Care Policies

The United States is experiencing immigration settlement patterns that are and will continue to impact health care. At the same time, women of color and immigrant women continue to experience dangerously high rates of health disparities. This paper explores current federal and state language access policies and the provision of reproductive health care within the context of these factors. law.scu.edu/socialjustice/wildman-writing-award

 

 

Happenings at the Center

Our Graduate Fellows

NeChele Rucker and Mary Grace GuzmanThrough the generosity of the law school, the Center was fortunate to have two Graduate Fellows, NeChele Rucker ’09 and Mary Grace Guzmán ’08 for the spring semester. The Fellows invaluable contributions include:

1)  E-Newsletter – designed a new Center for Social Justice E-Newsletter for distribution three times per year. The target audience includes alums, funders and legal services organizations.

2)  Web-based Teaching Supplement for Foundation Press’ Women and Law Stories. Conducted legal research for additional reference sources that will enhance the ability of professors to use the book in the law school classroom and beyond. Created a website with this legal research available for the Women and Law Stories II Conference as a classroom teaching aide, and for other academic uses.

3)  Student Testimonials for the Center website – conducted videotaped student interviews and testimonials about public interest and social justice law at SCU, emphasizing how the programming has positively impacted their law school experience.

Without their help, we could not have set these and many other projects in motion. Thank you, Mary Grace and NeChele!

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