Fall 2013 Law Briefs

FALL 2013
LAW BRIEFS

Sports Law and Ethics Symposium

Panelists and participants included (from left) Ramogi Huma, president, National College Players Association; Dr. Cindy Chang, a sports medicine specialist at U.C. Berkeley who served as chief team physician for U.C. Berkeley Athletics from 1995-2008 and chief medical officer for Team USA at the 2012 London Olympic Games; and Brent Jones, Former San Francisco 49er and NFL-All Pro.

Panelists and participants included (from left) Ramogi Huma, president, National College Players Association; Dr. Cindy Chang, a sports medicine specialist at U.C. Berkeley who served as chief team physician for U.C. Berkeley Athletics from 1995-2008 and chief medical officer for Team USA at the 2012 London Olympic Games; and Brent Jones, Former San Francisco 49er and NFL-All Pro.

Concussions in pro football, and the implications for youth sports, were discussed at the Fourth Annual Sports Law and Ethics Symposium in September, presented by Santa Clara University’s Institute of Sports Law and Ethics. The panel discussing concussions included New York Times reporter Alan Schwarz and Jeff Miller, National Football League senior vice president for health and safety policy. Other speakers at the event included retired San Francisco 49ers Ronnie Lott and Brent Jones. The abusive treatment of basketball players at Rutgers University in New Jersey was also discussed at the symposium.

For complete information on this years program, please visit law.scu.edu/sportslaw/


“It’s been a big year for Santa Clara Law’s high tech program. The school climbed to number three for IP law programs…in the 2013 U.S. News and World Report rankings….But if it seems that Santa Clara has made it onto the national stage, there’s no question where its roots lie… The simple fact of geography gives the 160-year-old Jesuit institution a history—and an alumni network—linking it to the epicenter of the tech industry.”

—from “Santa Clara Law Makes High Tech Mark,” The Recorder, Oct. 18, 2013.
Read the full article…


DIGITAL COMMONS BY THE NUMBERS

Since August 2011, Santa Clara Law has housed an extensive scholarship collection on Digital Commons, the Law library’s electronic archive system. The collection continues to expand, containing everything from faculty papers, student scholarship, and annual reports to texts from speakers’ presentations, including commencement. For more information or to browse documents, visit digitalcommons.law.scu.edu.

4,447

Number of records in Santa Clara Law’s Digital Commons collection as of August 2013.


622,467

Number of times Santa Clara Law’s Digital Commons records have been downloaded since the collection was started in August 2011.*


400+

Number of downloads in August 2013 for these three most popular papers: “In re Google Privacy Policy Litigation” (809 downloads) ; “AP v. Meltwater”(558 downloads) ; and “On Being Sane in Insane Places” (435 downloads).

31,671

Number of full-text downloads in August 2013.


46

Number of new submissions posted in August 2013.


9,210

Number of times the Santa Clara Law Review was downloaded in August 2013.


9,405

Number of historical and topical legal documents downloaded in August 2013.


5,510

Number of faculty publications downloaded in August 2013.

*as of October 9, 2013

David Onek

David Onek is the new executive director of the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara Law.

NCIP Appoints New Executive Director

Long-time criminal justice reformer David Onek has been appointed the new executive director for the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara Law. He replaces founding director Kathleen “Cookie” Ridolfi, who continues as a professor at the Law School. Onek served on the San Francisco Police Commission, helping to set policy and overseeing the police discipline process. Prior to that, he worked as a deputy director of San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom’s Office of Criminal Justice. He was a candidate for San Francisco District Attorney in 2011, running on a criminal justice reform platform and finishing second. He is the founding executive director of the Berkeley Center for Criminal Justice at U.C. Berkeley Law, where he brought together law enforcement and community in support of innovative, research-based policy reforms. He has taught at U.C. Berkeley Law and at U.C. Hastings College of the Law.


NCIP’s 17th Victory

In July, the Northern California Innocence Project announced the release of 72-year-old George Souliotes, who served 16 years in prison. Souliotes was exonerated for convictions for arson and triple murder after a fire at his rental property in Modesto. A federal court had found that Souliotes’ conviction was based on faulty fire science and that he received ineffective assistance at trial in 2000. The NCIP worked with law firms Morrison & Foerster and Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe. The exoneration marked the NCIP’s 17th victory since its creation in 2001.

Under terms of an agreement at the time of his release, Souliotes pled no contest to three counts of involuntary manslaughter for failure to maintain a working smoke alarm. “Mr. Souliotes and his defense team maintain his absolute innocence, and his decision to plead no contest for failure to maintain smoke alarms does not change that,” said Linda Starr, NCIP’s legal director.


Faculty News

Read updates on faculty research, press appearances and talks

Colleen Chien testifying in front of Congress Chien heads to White House

Professor Colleen Chien has been selected to serve in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, as senior advisor for intellectual property and innovation to Todd Park, the U.S. chief technology officer. She is taking a leave of absence from her teaching duties for at least a year to fulfill her new appointment, which began Sept. 16. In this role, she will advise Park on issues related to intellectual property and innovation, as well as privacy, open government, and civil liberties. Chien testified on Capitol Hill in July, her second appearance before Congress in the past year. She discussed abusive patent litigation in her appearance before the Intellectual Property and Internet Subcommittee of the House Judiciary Committee. She was named one of the “Top 50 Most Influential People in IP” by Managing Intellectual Property magazine, which cited Chien’s work on patent assertion entities, including the fact that she coined that term. Her work on patent trolls has sparked a national conversation, including a White House proposal for reform that repeatedly cited her research.

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