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David L. Sloss

Professor of Law

Professor Sloss is an internationally renowned scholar who has published two books and numerous law review articles addressing the application of international law in domestic courts. His scholarship in this area is informed by a decade of experience in the federal government, where he helped draft and negotiate several major international treaties. Professor Sloss serves frequently as a consultant for U.S. attorneys who seek advice on the domestic application of international law in U.S. courts.

Prior to joining the Santa Clara University School of Law faculty, Professor Sloss taught for nine years at Saint Louis University School of Law. Before Sloss started his teaching career, he worked as a litigation associate at Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich & Rosati in Palo Alto and clerked for Senior Judge Joseph T. Sneed, U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit, San Francisco. He also worked for the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency for nine years before he attended law school. During that time Sloss helped draft and negotiate three major East-West arms control treaties.

Education

J.D., Stanford University, 1996

M.P.P., Harvard University Kennedy School of Government, 1983

B.A., Hampshire College, 1981

Areas of Specialization

International Law, International Human Rights, Treaties, U.S. Foreign Relations Law, Constitutional Law, Federal Courts, Nuclear Proliferation

Affiliations and Honors

  • American Society of International Law Certificate of Merit “for high technical craftsmanship and utility to practicing lawyers and scholars,” awarded for a book on the history of international law in the U.S. Supreme Court
  • Member, American Law Institute (since 2013)
  • Member, International Law Association (since 2008)
  • Member, American Society of International Law (since 1999)
  • Member, American Bar Association (since 1999)
  • Member, State Bar of California (admitted 1997)

Other Links

Currently Teaching

Property Spring 2015
International Human Rights Theory and Practice Fall 2014